science

Topics and developments in science and medicine, presented by Futurism.

  • Crow Zing
    Published 2 years ago
    The Elephant Man Clinical Trial: Part One

    The Elephant Man Clinical Trial: Part One

    In 2006, when eight men checked into the Northwick General Hospital in London for taking part in a clinical trial for a new drug, they never thought they would be fighting for their lives.
  • Kryptos Journal
    Published 2 years ago
    Tracking HIV: The Spread and Origin

    Tracking HIV: The Spread and Origin

    HIV and AIDs is by far the worst epidemic we’ve seen in the 21st century. Approximately 1 in 4 people are infected and many cultures are affected without the healthcare to prevent or care for the people who have the disease. The prevalence for the disease in our language is lackluster when compared to cancers, heart disease, or even Alzheimer’s, however that further portrays this disease as the silent and deadly killer that we associate with it. Often going unsaid, those effected will suffer through stages of depression and hopelessness. The people around them will also be brought down, and there is not much support available for HIV/AID’s patients. After the epidemic increases to a legitimate danger to life & health of the immediate region effected, then those support programs will pop up. For example, AVERT & UNAIDS are doing great work in containing and supporting those who are affected and their families in highly infected regions of the world, such as South Africa.
  • Crow Zing
    Published 2 years ago
    Are We Going to Cure Cancer with CRISPR?

    Are We Going to Cure Cancer with CRISPR?

    Remember GATTACA, the movie featuring Ethan Hawke living in a world where the genetics of people are improved because they use biometrics to help edit the genes of those subjected to disorders?
  • Richard Van Steenberg
    Published 2 years ago
    Tach One Is the Speed of Light

    Tach One Is the Speed of Light

    Conventional wisdom on Earth currently views the ultimate speed at which objects can travel to be the speed of light. This was explained by Albert Einstein in his theory of relativity.
  • Thomas Ralph
    Published 2 years ago
    Faeces, Waste or Fuel?

    Faeces, Waste or Fuel?

    Ever since the dawn of motorised transportation and electricity in our homes, man has wondered if there could be a more renewable manner of running these fossil fuel dependent machines. As time moved on, the necessity for alternate power sources increased and with it came many possibilities thought up by many geniuses globally. The issue with these alternates is that they’re incredibly expensive to run, take a toll on the earth to build and governments simply refuse to invest in this when a cheaper alternative exists. The planet is in dire need of a more sustainable, cheaper, and less destructive power source. Without one global solution in the next twenty years, the human race may have to look to other planets in order to survive.
  • Sydney Andrews
    Published 2 years ago
    The Science of Zombies

    The Science of Zombies

    When we think of zombies, we typically think of the dead crawling out of their graves and eating brains. This is not the case when it comes to "reality." With mutations and the world of disease and infection evolving, a "zombie outbreak" is very possible. New sciences and technology are constantly changing the world.
  • Paul Writes
    Published 2 years ago
    Ever Wonder Why The T-Rex Couldn't Catch Claire In 'Jurassic World'? Science Just Explained Why

    Ever Wonder Why The T-Rex Couldn't Catch Claire In 'Jurassic World'? Science Just Explained Why

    It's been over two years since Jurassic World hit theaters, and fan interest in the property is already aimed at the upcoming sequel, but certain aspects of Jurassic World are still under scrutiny by fans. The most pertinent of these is one of the final scenes of the film, which depicted Claire leading a T-rex to the last showdown with the Indominus rex.
  • daniel morris
    Published 2 years ago
    Stellar Cruise Part 5

    Stellar Cruise Part 5

    When things finally come to a head, will the passengers and crew be ready...
  • Tom Chapman
    Published 2 years ago
    On Your Marks, Get Rex, Go: Science Finally Answers If You Could Outrun A T-Rex

    On Your Marks, Get Rex, Go: Science Finally Answers If You Could Outrun A T-Rex

    We all know that Jurassic Park could never happen (more's the pity), and unless you are Dr. Ross Geller from Friends, the fact that the dinosaurs don't look enough like birds and the Velociraptors are too large probably won't keep you up at night. Most people enjoy the films for the sci-fi horrors they are and forget the science behind the scenes. However, over the past four films, there is one question that has always puzzled us: Can you really outrun a T-Rex?
  • Anna Black
    Published 2 years ago
    The Emergence of the 'Superbugs'

    The Emergence of the 'Superbugs'

    The name 'superbug' is a bit of a contradiction in itself. 'Super' is often used with a positive tone, implying that something is great or serves an important purpose. Superman is known for his heroics and the fact that he is, well... super. A 'bug' though conjures images of insects or germs. A 'superbug', by definition, can be one of two things. It can be a bacteria which is enhanced to better serve a purpose or function. Colloquially though, the term is used to describe a bacteria which has evolved to be resistant to the conventional treatment of antibiotics. A 'superbug' is known as a bacterium which cause uncontrollable infections, a microbe which can't be eradicated, a germ which can kill when normally it shouldn't.
  • Paul Scott Anderson
    Published 2 years ago
    Giant Space Cigar: New Observations Show Weird Interstellar Asteroid is 'like Nothing Seen Before'

    Giant Space Cigar: New Observations Show Weird Interstellar Asteroid is 'like Nothing Seen Before'

    A few weeks ago, something surprising happened when astronomers noticed an odd object moving quickly through the Solar System. Being on a large looping trajectory, it was first thought to be a previously unknown comet, but then calculations showed that it couldn't have originated from within the Solar System, it must have come from somewhere else. Follow-up observations also showed that it was more like an asteroid, rather than a comet. Now, astronomers have published their most detailed findings yet, and this object, named 'Oumuamua (Hawaiian, meaning scout or messenger coming from the past), is "like nothing seen before."
  • Dr. Williams
    Published 2 years ago
    Common Ground

    Common Ground

    When in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for nations to come together for the common good of humanity. When over sixteen thousand scientists recently agreed on one aspect of the future of our planet, mankind has to take heed and recognize the severity of our predicament in relationship to our world around. No longer can we sit idly by and let greed take precedent over common sense. Our world is fast becoming inhospitable due to our continued lack of concern for the future.