Latest in Cleats

  • MB
    Published 2 months ago
    1990 FIFA World Cup

    1990 FIFA World Cup

    The FIFA World Cup of 1990 was the 14th FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international football competition. It was held from 8 June until 8 July 1990 in Italy, the second country to host the event twice. Teams from 116 national football associations entered, and the qualification started in April 1988. Through this process, twenty-two teams emerged along with host nation Italy and defending champions Argentina. West Germany won the tournament, which is their third World Cup title. They beat Argentina 1–0 at Stadio Olimpico in Rome, a repeat in the previous final four years ago. Italy finished third and England finished fourth despite both losing their semi-finals in penalty shoots. It was the last tournament that featured a West Germany team, with the country reunified with East Germany a few months later in October, as well as Eastern Bloc teams before the end of the Cold War in 1991, when the Soviet Union, Romania, Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia teams made their appearances. The first Final appearances were made by Costa Rica, Ireland and the UAE. It was the last time since 2018 that the UAE has qualified for a FIFA World Cup finals. Adidas Etrusco Unico was official ball for the match. As for the football, the 1990 World Cup is widely regarded as one of the worst World Cups. This resulted in an average of 2.2 goals per game – a record low that is still standing – and 16 red cards including the first ever final dismissal. Considered to be the World Cup that undoubtedly had the most lasting effect on the game as a whole, it saw the Fair Play Flag pre-match being introduced to encourage fair play. Defensive tactics led to the introduction of the backpass rule in 1992 and to three points instead of two for a victory in the forthcoming World Cups. In addition to what has become the soundtrack of the World Cup, the tournament has produced some of the World Cup's best-remembered moments and stories including the emergence of African nations: "Nessun dorma" The 1990 World Cup ranks among the most watched events in the history of television, garnering an estimated 26.69 billion non-unique viewers over the duration of the tournament. This was the first World Cup to be officially filmed and broadcast by Italian broadcaster RAI in HDTV in cooperation with Japan's NHK. The immense success of the broadcast model has also had a profound impact on the sport. At the time, it was the most watched World Cup in history in non-unique viewers but it was improved by the 1994 and 2002 World Cups. In 1990 twelve stadiums in twelve cities were chosen to host World Cup matches. Bari's San Nicola Stadium and Turin's Stadio delle Alpi have become brand new stadiums set up for World Cup. Just two of the twelve stadia used for the 1934 FIFA World Cup had been used. FIFA also found the seeds a secondary consideration dependent on the nations 'participation in the 1986 World Cup with World Cup 1982 in particular. Six of the final eight in 1986 had qualified for the tournament in 1990, with Mexico and France absent. Italy – first seeded as hosts – had not reached the final eight in 1986, leaving FIFA in need of eliminating one of the three quarter-finals excluded in 1986: Brazil, England or Spain. Cameroon had reached the quarter-finals where they were narrowly defeated by England. They ended the tournament with a surprise victory over the defending champions of Argentina, before leading the group ahead of them, Romania's Soviet Union runners-up and the European Championship. The success was shot by the goals of Roger Milla, a 38-year-old forward who came out of international retirement to join the national squad at the last minute following a personal appeal from Cameroonian president Paul Biya.
  • MB
    Published 2 months ago
    1998 FIFA World Cup

    1998 FIFA World Cup

    In 1998 the FIFA World Cup was the 16th FIFA World Cup, the unofficial championship of the men's national football teams association. It was held in France from 10 June until 12 July 1998. For the second time in the history of the competition FIFA named the country as the host nation, defeating Morocco in the bidding process. This was the second time France hosted the exhibition, and the seventh time it was held in Europe. It was the first World Cup held under the leadership of Sepp Blatter. The final qualifying began in March 1996, and finished in November 1997. The group stage was extended for the first time in the tournament from 24 teams to 32, with eight groupings of four. 64 matches were played at Stade de France, Saint-Denis, in 10 stadiums in 10 host cities, with the opening match and the final game. France's World Cup hosting plan concentrated on an 80,000-seat national stadium and nine other stadiums spread throughout the world. When the finals were first contested in July 1992, neither of the national club grounds were able to meet FIFA's requirements – that is, being able to comfortably seat 40,000. The proposed national stadium, colloquially referred to as the 'Grand Stadium,' encountered uncertainty at every planning stage; politics, economy and cultural importance determined the stadium's location. As Mayor of Paris, Jacques Chirac succeeded in striking a agreement with Prime Minister Édouard Balladur to bring the Stade de France to the municipality of Saint-Denis just north of the capital, as it is called today. Construction on the stadium began in December 1995, and was completed after 26 months of construction in November 1997 at a cost of about 2.67 billion. In particular, 10 stadiums were used for the finals; in addition to nine matches being played at the Stade de France, an further six matches were held at the Parc des Princes in Paris Saint-Germain, bringing the cumulative number of matches contested in Paris to 15. France played for four of their seven matches at the national stadium; they also participated in the second and third largest cities in the world, Marseille and Lyon, as well as a round of 16 knockout matches in northern city Lens. Nantes, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Montpellier, and Saint-Etienne each played a total of 6 matches; all the used stadiums have played second stage matches. This was the first World Cup in which fourth officers used electronic displays, not carton. The knockout stage consisted of the 16 teams that were advancing from the group stage of the competition. In the knockout round, every draw at 90 minutes was followed by 30 minutes of extra time for each team; if scores were still level there was a penalty shoot-out to determine who went on to the next round. If during extra time a team wins, the golden goal comes into play, becoming the winner that ends the game. The final was played on the 12th of July 1998 at Stade de France, Saint-Denis. France defeated Brazil 3–0 champions, with two goals from Zinedine Zidane and a stop-off time shot from Emmanuel Petit. The triumph secured France their first World Cup trophy, becoming the sixth national team after Uruguay, Italy, England, West Germany and Argentina to bring the tournament to their home soil. We have suffered the second-heaviest defeat to Brazil in the World Cup, only to be overtaken by Germany's 7–1 demolition to Brazil in the semi-finals of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. The pre-match build-up was dominated by the exclusion from the start line-up by Brazilian striker Ronaldo, only to be recalled 45 minutes before kick-off.
  • MB
    Published 2 months ago
    1994 FIFA World Cup

    1994 FIFA World Cup

    The 1994 FIFA World Cup was the 15th edition of FIFA World Cup, the world championship for men's national soccer teams. This was funded by the United States and took place from June 17 to July 17, 1994 at nine locations around the country. On 4 July 1988 FIFA chose the United States as host. Given the absence of soccer heritage in the host nation, the event was the most commercially lucrative in World Cup history; helped by the high-capacity stadiums in the U.S., it broke the average World Cup attendance record of over 69,000 fans per game, a figure that still holds. Despite the subsequent widening of the competition from 24 to 32 teams, which was first introduced at the 1998 World Cup and is the latest format, the overall attendance of about 3.6 million for the final tournament remains the highest in the WC's history. Brazil won the tournament after the game ended 0–0 after beating Italy 3–2 in a penalty shoot- Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California close to Los Angeles, after some extra time. This was the first to be finalised in the World Cup finals on penalties. The achievement made Brazil the first nation to claim four World Cup titles. The tournament was attended by three new entrants: Greece, Nigeria and Saudi Arabia plus two countries formed at the end of the Cold War: Russia, after the break-up of the Soviet Union, and a newly reunified Germany took part in the tournament for the first time since 1938, after the reunification of that country in October 1990, which took place a few months after the victory of West Ge In the midst of the dispute, the U.S. hosted a highly popular match with a total attendance of nearly 70,000 setting a record that surpassed the maximum FIFA World Cup attendance of 51,000 in 1966, due to the large seating capacity provided to the fans by the U.S. stadiums compared to the smaller grounds in Europe and Latin America. Until this day, after the extension of the competition from 24 until 32 nations at the 1998 World Cup in France, the overall attendance of almost 3.6 million for the final game remains the largest in the history of the World Cup. On 19 December 1993 in Las Vegas Germany, Brazil, Argentina, Belgium, Italy and the United States were seeded for final draw. The format of the contest remained the same as in 1990 World Cup: 24 qualified teams, divided into six groups of four. The six group champions will qualify for the knockout phase, the six group runners-up and the four third-placed teams with the best records. Because of the 1998 expansion of the final tournament to 32 teams, this was the last time this format was used. This World Cup was the first to earn three points, instead of two, for a win. Following many teams 'defensive display at Italia' 90, FIFA launched this feature to encourage a soccer attack. The tournament saw the end of Diego Maradona's World Cup career, having participated in the 1982, 1986 and 1990 World Cups, leading Argentina to the 1986 World Cup title and the 1990 World Cup final. Maradona was suspended after he failed a drug check that contained ephedrine in his saliva, a weight losing drug. Colombia has failed to make it from the round robin, raising high expectations because of its style and excellent qualifying campaign. The team was reportedly dogged by pressure from betting syndicates and drug cartels, with coach Francisco Maturana receiving death threats over selection of squads. Defender Andrés Escobar was a tragic figure of this tournament as he scored his own goal in the group stage game against the United States which eliminated his team. Just 10 days later, Escobar was shot to death outside a pub in a suburb of Medellín, seemingly in retaliation for his own goal. The opening ceremony of the World Cup took place on 17 June at the Chicago Soldier Field.
  • MB
    Published 2 months ago
    2002 FIFA World Cup

    2002 FIFA World Cup

    The FIFA World Cup 2002 was the 17th FIFA World Cup, organized by FIFA, the men's national football association teams 'quadrennial world championship. It was held from 31 May to 30 June 2002 at locations in South Korea and Japan, with Japan hosting the final match at Yokohama International Stadion. For this World Cup, which was the first to be held in Asia, the first to be held outside the Americas or Europe, a field of 32 teams participated and the first to be hosted jointly by more than one nation. Ukraine, Cameroon, Senegal and Slovenia made world cup debuts. The tournament saw some upsets and surprising outcomes, including eliminating the defending champions of France in the group stage after winning a single point and also dropping the second favorites of Argentina in the group stage. South Korea managed to make the semi-finals, beating Spain, Italy and Portugal on the way, becoming the first country to reach the last four World Cups from outside Europe and the Americas. Yet the most dominant team of the competition, Brazil, has won, winning the final against Germany 2–0, rendering them the first and only country to lift the World Cup five times. The victory qualified Brazil in one row for the Confederations Cups of 2003 and later 2005, with its fourth and fifth appearance in the Confederations Cup. Turkey won 3–2 in the third-play-off match against South Korea, coming third in just its second ever FIFA World Cup and scoring the fastest goal in FIFA World Cup history. The 2002 World Cup has also been the last to take advantage of the law of golden goals. South Korea and Japan both received 10 venues, most of which were newly built for the tournament. Groups A – D played all their matches in South Korea, while group E – H played all their matches in Japan. The Stadiums Daegu, Suwon, Yokohama, and Saitama all played four matches each, while the other 16 stadiums played three matches each. Notably, there were no matches played in Osaka, making it the city of the second host nation not to have a World Cup venue. The semi-finals saw two 1–0 games; Michael Ballack, the first semi-final, played in Seoul, had a respectable goal enough for Germany to defeat South Korea. However, Ballack had already received a yellow card during the previous match which caused him to miss the final based on accumulated yellow cards. Ronaldo scored a goal in Saitama early in the second half of the next day, scoring his sixth of the competition for Brazil, which beat Turkey in a replay of their Group C meeting. Two goals by Ronaldo sealed the World Cup for Brazil when they claimed victory over Germany in the final match played in Yokohama, Japan. Ronaldo scored twice in the second half and after the game won the Golden Shoe Trophy for the tournament's highest scorer, with eight goals. It was the fifth World Cup win for Brazil, cementing its status as the most successful national team in the history of the tournament. Brazil became the first team to lift the trophy since Argentina in 1986, without having to face a penalty shoot-out at any point during the knock-out phase and the total number of penalty shoot-outs was the lowest since the four-round knockout system was introduced in 1986. Brazil also became the first team to win every game in the World Cup Finals since 1970 and set a new record for a World Cup winner with the highest overall difference in goal. Brazil's captain Cafu, who became the first player to appear in three successive World Cup finals, has won the award on behalf of the country.
  • MB
    Published 2 months ago
    2006 FIFA World Cup

    2006 FIFA World Cup

    The 2006 FIFA World Cup was the 18th FIFA World Cup, the international football community's quadrennial world championship competition. It was held from 9 June to 9 July 2006 in Germany, which gained the right to host the festival in July 2000. Teams from 198 national football associations from all six populated continents participated in the qualification process, which began in September 2003. Thirty-one teams have qualified from this cycle along with host nation Germany for the final tournament. It was the second time Germany hosted the exhibition, the first as a single country and the tenth time it was held in Europe. Italy won the tournament and clinched its fourth World Cup title. We defeated France 5–3 in a penalty shoot-out in the final, having ended up in a 1–1 draw after extra time. Germany defeated Portugal 3–1 to come in sixth. Angola, Liberia, Ivory Coast, Trinidad and Tobago and Togo made their first appearances in the final. This was also the first appearance under the name of Serbia and Montenegro, although they had appeared as Yugoslavia in 1998 earlier. Montenegro voted in a referendum at the end of May 2006, just before the tournament, to become a independent country and to sever the then-existing loose confederacy between it and Serbia, with Serbia acknowledging the result of the referendum early in June. Owing to time constraints, FIFA saw Serbia and Montenegro play as one team in the World Cup tournament, marking the first instance of many independent nations that have competed as one team in a global football competition since UEFA Euro 1992. The 2006 World Cup ranks among the most watched events in television history, attracting an unprecedented 26.29 billion seen times obtained during the tournament. The final reached an audience of overwhelming 715.1 million people. In 2006 Germany had a plethora of football stadiums that had exceeded FIFA's total capacity of 40,000 seats for World Cup matches. The venue for the final match in 1974, the still-standing Munich Olympiastadion, was not chosen for the tournament, since the rules of FIFA require one town to use two stadiums. The LTU Arena in Düsseldorf, the Weserstadion in Bremen and the Borussia-Park at Mönchengladbach are not even included. Twelve stadia have been picked to host World Cup matches. Many of them were known by specific names during the match, since FIFA bans the sponsorship of the stadium unless the owners of the stadium are also registered FIFA owners. For example, the Allianz Arena in Munich was known as FIFA World Cup Stadium, Munich, and even letters from the Allianz corporation were missing or obscured prior to the match. Several of the stadiums have have a reduced capacity for the World Cup, as FIFA regulations forbid standing rooms; however, this was accommodated because certain stadiums have a UEFA score of five stars. The stadiums hosted six matches each in Berlin, Munich, Dortmund, and Stuttgart, while five matches each hosted the other eight stadia. Final tournament of the World Cup 2006 concluded on 9 June. The 32 teams were split into eight groups of four teams each, in which the teams took part in a round-robin tournament to determine the two of those four teams would progress to the 16-team knock-out stage that started June 24. A total of 64 games were played. Even though Germany struggled to win the Cup, Germany considers the tournament to be a big success overall. Germany has seen a dramatic increase in the national spirit of flag movements which have traditionally been frowned upon by German society since World War II, when the German team played. The eight seeded teams were invited to the 2006 tournament on 6 December 2005. In the draw the seeds used Pot A. Pot B included the unseeded qualifiers for Latin America, Asia and Oceania; Pot C contained eight of the remaining nine European countries, except for Serbia and Montenegro. Pot D contained unseeded teams from both the CONCACAF region and from Asia. Serbia and Montenegro were included in a different pot: this was done to ensure three European teams were not represented in the group. In the special pool Serbia and Montenegro were first drawn, then their division was drawn from the three seeded non-European nations, Argentina, Brazil and Mexico.
  • MB
    Published 2 months ago
    1970 FIFA World Cup

    1970 FIFA World Cup

    The 1970 FIFA World Cup was the 9th FIFA World Cup for men's national teams, the quadrennial world football competition. Played in Mexico from May 31 to June 21, it was North America's first World Cup tournament and the first to be played in Europe and South America. Teams from 75 nations from all six inhabited continents joined the race, and in May 1968 its qualification rounds began. Fourteen teams emerged from this phase in the 16-team final tournament to join host nation Mexico and defending champions England. In the final stage El Salvador, Israel and Morocco made their first appearances. Brazil won the tournament, and beat another two-time world champion, Italy, in the Mexico City final 4–1. The victory won Brazil its third World Cup title and allowed them to retain the Jules Rimet Trophy permanently, and in 1974 a new trophy was launched. The winning side, led by Carlos Alberto and featuring players like Pelé, Gérson, Jairzinho, Rivellino, and Tostão, is frequently cited as the World Cup's best team ever. They continued to maintain a flawless record of victories in all six finals games as well as winning all their qualification fixtures. England were the defending champions who were knocked out of the tournament following a 2–3 defeat in the quarter-final to West Germany. Given the altitude and high temperature problems, the finals have consistently produced football assaults that have established an average goals per game record that has not been surpassed by any subsequent World Cup finals since. With the developments of satellite technology, the 1970 Finals attracted a new FIFA World Cup record-breaking viewing audience when games were televised all around the world and, of a few cases, in colour-the first time that that was the case. Contrary to popular opinion, although a limited percentage of spectators worldwide viewed the tournament on colour TV and colour images and photos have since been commonly shared of common tournament depictions, the bulk of people viewing the tournament have done so in black and white. A total of 75 nations have reached the 1970 FIFA World Cup, and 73 have had to qualify. 68 teams ultimately played in the qualification stages due to withdrawn submissions and withdrawals, including eight first time. Automatic qualification was given to Mexico as the host nation and England as defending World Cup winners, with the remaining 14 final places split among the continental confederations. All four of the semi-finalists were past world champions, with the line-up guaranteeing a European-South American finale. In the all-South American game, controversially moved from the capital to Guadalajara's lower altitude, Brazil returned from behind to beat Uruguay 3–1 and won the right to qualify for their fourth World Cup Final. In the final 15 minutes, two Brazilian goals determined a match which had been closely balanced up until that point. The all-European encounter between Italy and West Germany created a match that many considered as one of the best World Cup games ever. Having lead by Roberto Boninsegna's strike from the eighth minute, Italy was caught in injury when Karl-Heinz Schnellinger sweeper scored his only international goal. When the score swung between the two teams, the extra time brought five more goals before Gianni Rivera gave the Azzurri a convincing 4–3 advantage. The match later became known as the "Game of the Century," and today it is commemorated with a memorial at the Estadio Azteca. West Germany managed to beat Uruguay 1–0 in the battle for third place. Brazil opened the scoring in the final when Pelé headed in a Rivellino cross in the 18th minute but after a series of blunders in the Brazilian defence Roberto Boninsegna equalised for Italy. The match remained until the 66th minute when a powerful shot by Gérson regained the lead for the Brazilians.
  • MB
    Published 2 months ago
    1974 FIFA World Cup

    1974 FIFA World Cup

    The FIFA World Cup 1974 was the 10th FIFA World Cup, held in West Germany between June 13th and July 7th. The tournament marked the first time the latest trophy, the FIFA World Cup Trophy, designed by Italian sculptor Silvio Gazzaniga, was awarded. For the third time in 1970 Brazil retained the previous crown, the Jules Rimet Crown, which was formally awarded to the Brazilians. This was the first of three World Cups to carry 2 rounds of group stage. The host nation won the title, in the final at the Munich Olympiastadion, beating the Netherlands 2–1. The victory was the second for West Germany that had won in 1954. Canada, West Germany, Haiti and Zaire made their first appearances at the final stage, with East Germany appearing not after Germany was unified in 1990. FIFA named West Germany as host nation on 6 July 1966 in London, England. At the same time, it was awarded the hosting rights for the 1978 and 1982 tournaments. West Germany agreed to an agreement with Spain to assist West Germany in the 1974 tournament and West Germany would allow Spain to participate unopposedly in the 1982 World Cup in exchange for that. Like England, France, 1966 champions, hosts and quarter-finalists from the 1970 Mexico, Spain, Portugal third-place finishers from 1966, Peru, Belgium, Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Romania four-place finalists from 1970 have not qualified any of the most successful soccer nations. After the Chilean coup d'état in 1973, the USSR was also suspended, despite refusing to travel against Chile for the second leg of their playoff. The Netherlands and Poland had qualified for the very first time since 1938. Scotland was back in the final after being absent 16 years earlier. Since missing the tournament in 1970, Argentina and Chile both returned and Yugoslavia returned since skipping all the tournaments in 1966 and 1970. A modern tournament format introduced here. While the competition started again with the seventeen nations split into four groups of four nations, the eight progressing teams struggled to reach a knockout stage as they did in the previous five World Cups but instead played in a second group round. In the second stage the winners of the two groups then played each other in the final, with the respective runners-up from each group competing in the third place play-off. That was one of two times that this system was deployed; in 1982, a semi-final stage was introduced for the second group stage before the World Cup revived the 1986 knockout stage and is now used until the present day. The tournament was held mostly in bad conditions, so that the stadium had little covered areas. Few Western European nations participated, only the Netherlands, West Germany and Sweden took part in the Group Stage. Cultural circumstances hindered fans from neighbouring Eastern Communist states like east Germany. The first round, or first stage of the competition, saw the 16 teams split into four team groups of four. A six-game round-robin was conducted by division, where each team played one match against each of the other teams within the same division. Teams got two points for a victory, one point for a draw and zero for a defeat. For the second round, the teams in each group that finished first and second advanced, while the two bottom teams in each group were excluded from the play. That was the only condition for the defending European champions to lift the World Cup, until Spain defeated the Netherlands in South Africa's 2010 FIFA World Cup final. Although France still held both cups in different order, at the same time winning the World Cup in 1998 followed by Euro 2000. It is the final of four FIFA World Cup tournaments to date with no extra matches in time. The examples are the 1930-, 1950- and 1962 Tournaments.
  • MB
    Published 2 months ago
    1934 FIFA World Cup

    1934 FIFA World Cup

    The 1934 FIFA World Cup was the second FIFA World Cup, the international title for the men's national association football teams. It was carried over from May 27 through June 10, 1934, in Italy. The 1934 World Cup became the first team to participate in the qualification process of the games. Thirty-two nations joined the competition, and after qualifying, 16 of those teams got to compete in the final tournament. Reigning champions Uruguay declined to take part because their invitation to the 1930 tournament had already been accepted by four European nations. Italy became the second World Cup winners, and the first European team to participate, eventually beating Czechoslovakia 2-1. Like the Berlin Olympics two years later, the 1934 World Cup acted as a high-profile example of a sporting event being used for obvious political benefit. Benito Mussolini was keen on using the game as a means of encouraging populism. Made in Italy, the Federale 102 was the match ball issued for the 1934 World Cup. At a meeting held in Sweden on 9 October 1932, Italy was chosen as the host nation after a lengthy decision-making process during which the FIFA Executive Committee met eight different times until they could agree upon one. Without a leaders ballot, the Executive Committee did the vote. The Italian bid was ideally chosen from Sweden; the Italian Government accepted the tournament with a budget of 3.5 million lire. Thirty-six countries applied for admission to the tournament, thus needing qualifying matches to limit the field to sixteen. Back though, there weren't many noticeable absentees. Reacting to the refusal of many European nations to travel for the recent World Cup to South America, which Uruguay hosted in 1930, Uruguay declined to join. Consequently, the 1934 World Cup is the only one the defending champions did not participate in. The British Home Nations had refused to partake in a period of self-imposed exile from FIFA, but, without qualifying, the FIFA had granted free access to the tournament in England and Scotland. The chairman of the Football Association Board, Charles Sutcliffe, called the competition a "joke" and said that "the national teams of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland have much to do in their own International Championship which appears to me to be a much better World Championship than the one to be held in Italy." Of the 32 entries, only 10 came from outside Europe, only four of the 16 qualified teams came. The final spot in the final was determined in a one-off match between the U.S. and Mexico in Rome just three days before the start of the tournament which the U.S. won. The number of fans from other countries, including 7,000 from the Netherlands and 10,000 from Austria and Switzerland, was greater than any other football tournament since. The group stage featured in the first World Cup was eliminated, in favour of a single elimination competition. If a match has been tied then thirty minutes of extra time played after ninety minutes. The match was replayed the next day, since after extra time the score was still tied. Over the years, several sources have indicated that the competition may have been marred by corruption and corrupted by the Italian dictator Benito Mussolini, who used the rivalry for fascism as a propaganda tool. Mussolini himself, according to these reports, named referees for matches in which the Italian national team played, while the Italian government interfered in FIFA's game preparation, reorganising match planning to better support fascism. Nevertheless, Italy won the next edition of the World Cup, as well as the race for Olympic football in 1936.
  • Michael Ferger
    Published 2 months ago
    FC Bayern duo and other football stars helping fight COVID-19

    FC Bayern duo and other football stars helping fight COVID-19

    In difficult times, with the threat of job cuts and company closures hanging over everyone's head, it is always great to read about some good news. While we're all constantly wondering as to when this entire crisis is going to end, some key public figures are doing their bit to help.