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The Last Confirmed Sightings Of Extinct Animals

Today, we will delve into the rediscovery of creatures that once inhabited our planet.

By Thando TPublished 3 months ago 3 min read
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Extinction is a natural occurrence, and our world has sadly witnessed the loss of numerous animal species. Climate changes and human activities have contributed to the disappearance of many more on a daily basis.

However, to the joy of biologists and animal enthusiasts, certain animals that were thought to be extinct for decades or even millions of years have miraculously made a surprising comeback.

Join us as we uncover the most recent confirmed sightings of 10 of these remarkable creatures, known as "Lazarus Animals," named after the biblical Lazarus who rose from the dead.

Our first story takes us to Australia, including the islands of Tasmania and the country of New Guinea, where we encounter the extraordinary Tasmanian tiger.

Before its extinction, the Tasmanian tiger, also referred to as the Thylacine and Tasmanian wolf, roamed freely as a wild animal. It was characterized by its dark eyes, fox-like face, and distinct dark stripes along its back.

The last known Tasmanian tiger was believed to have perished in 1936 after the death of the final individual at Tasmania's Hobart Zoo. One would assume that was the end of this mysterious marsupial, but it was not.

In September 2016, sightings of the creature were officially documented. Then, in 2018, a woman reported that she had spotted what she believed to be a Tasmanian tiger accompanied by two cubs at the Hartz Mountains National Park. Since then, several other sightings have been recorded.

Moving on to our next entry, we have a subspecies of the Spectacled caiman that is typically found in southern Colombia.

The Rio Apaporis caiman was considered lost to the scientific community in 1952. However, biologist Sergio Balaguera-Reina, unconvinced of its extinction, embarked on a challenging expedition in December 2018 to search for this caiman species.

With the assistance of the local indigenous community, he made his way to the Apaporis River in April, which spans 700 miles from central Colombia to the Brazilian border and serves as the nesting grounds for the caiman. Version 1: On Fernandina Island in the Galapagos, we stumbled upon a solitary female. Version 1: On Fernandina Island in the Galapagos, we stumbled upon a solitary female.

Extinction is a natural occurrence, and our world has sadly witnessed the loss of numerous animal species. Climate changes and human activities have contributed to the disappearance of many more on a daily basis.

However, to the joy of biologists and animal enthusiasts, certain animals that were thought to be extinct for decades or even millions of years have miraculously made a surprising comeback.

Join us as we uncover the most recent confirmed sightings of 10 of these remarkable creatures, known as "Lazarus Animals," named after the biblical Lazarus who rose from the dead.

Our first story takes us to Australia, including the islands of Tasmania and the country of New Guinea, where we encounter the extraordinary Tasmanian tiger.

Before its extinction, the Tasmanian tiger, also referred to as the Thylacine and Tasmanian wolf, roamed freely as a wild animal. It was characterized by its dark eyes, fox-like face, and distinct dark stripes along its back.

The last known Tasmanian tiger was believed to have perished in 1936 after the death of the final individual at Tasmania's Hobart Zoo. One would assume that was the end of this mysterious marsupial, but it was not.

In September 2016, sightings of the creature were officially documented. Then, in 2018, a woman reported that she had spotted what she believed to be a Tasmanian tiger accompanied by two cubs at the Hartz Mountains National Park. Since then, several other sightings have been recorded.

Moving on to our next entry, we have a subspecies of the Spectacled caiman that is typically found in southern Colombia.

The Rio Apaporis caiman was considered lost to the scientific community in 1952. However, biologist Sergio Balaguera-Reina, unconvinced of its extinction, embarked on a challenging expedition in December 2018 to search for this caiman species.

With the assistance of the local indigenous community, he made his way to the Apaporis River in April, which spans 700 miles from central Colombia to the Brazilian border and serves as the nesting grounds for the caiman. Version 1: On Fernandina Island in the Galapagos, we stumbled upon a solitary female. Version 1: On Fernandina Island in the Galapagos, we stumbled upon a solitary female.

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Thando T

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