history

Iconic moments in music history.

  • M J Steel Collins
    Published 2 years ago
    What Are We Fighting For?

    What Are We Fighting For?

    Following the cessation of both the First and Second World Wars, the general attitude was that this level of conflict should be prevented from happening again. That may have been the mode of thought, and a rather commendable one at that. However, the sad fact is that humankind has pretty much been imploding into deadly conflict almost non-stop for well over a century, and, sadly, it doesn't seem like it's going to end anytime soon. There will always be protest, in various forms, against war—and one of the most powerful types of protest is music itself.
  • Domonic Tracy
    Published 2 years ago
    The Black Belt of A Capella

    The Black Belt of A Capella

    "Barbershop is the black belt of a capella."
  • Philip Jancsy
    Published 2 years ago
    'Stalag 17' – How This Record Has Traveled Through Time

    'Stalag 17' – How This Record Has Traveled Through Time

    1973 – Kingston, Jamaica. While the world was watching Big George Foreman knocking the hell out of Smokin Joe Frazier, just a few miles away, Stalag 17, one of the most legendary records in history, was put together. (Alright, I don't know if it was actually the same exact time, but it was the same year and the same city — you get the picture.)
  • Kyle Stumpo
    Published 2 years ago
    History of Sound Recording
  • Sam Gallagher
    Published 3 years ago
    Political Pink Floyd

    Political Pink Floyd

    Pink Floyd produced seminal works in the creation of the concept album during '70s. Of these concept albums, The Dark Side of the Moon perhaps is the most famous. Released in 1973, The Dark Side of the Moon has since spent almost 1000 weeks on the Billboard Albums charts, one of the highest of any other album created thus far.
  • George Appleton
    Published 3 years ago
    Rock 'n' Roll in Soho!

    Rock 'n' Roll in Soho!

    Rock 'n' roll started in Soho. Well actually, no it didn't, but it found Soho and made its home there. Rock 'n' roll actually started in the United States in the 50s, but it made its way over to England through mainly the radio (see Radio Caroline) and the records were traded, bought, sold, and stolen in the docks up and down the country. (For instance the docks up in Liverpool were great places to get the latest American records as found out the members of a skiffle band later to become a pop band called The Beatles, but more on them later.) However it made it there, it did, and found a welcome home in Soho. This marriage of rock 'n' roll and the seedy wondrous streets and venues gave birth to British rock 'n' roll and changed the face of music forever.
  • Patricia Sarkar
    Published 3 years ago
    6 Songs That Had a Lasting Impact on Society

    6 Songs That Had a Lasting Impact on Society

    Songs and musicians can do more than just entertain; they can also inspire. Last year, Eminem raised awareness for a good cause in England on his social media account following the Manchester attack that left dozens dead and hundreds injured.
  • Larissa van Orselen
    Published 3 years ago
    School of Vivaldi

    School of Vivaldi

    In this article, I will briefly introduce you to a piece of Antonio Vivaldi; Concerto in E Minor, Op. 3 No. 4. I am going to do this by first explaining what the function of this piece was in relation to the viewers of the performance as well as the performers themselves. Then I am going to discuss the musical aspects, like the rhythm and the key.
  • Nikki S
    Published 3 years ago
    The Evolution of Music

    The Evolution of Music

    Music has come a very long way, especially in the Western side of the world. Globally, we have all collectively gone through billions of albums and trends in music. But why? Why do tastes in music change? And how long do we have left till we will no longer be left with original ideas? Continue reading to find that out and more...
  • Kayla Charles
    Published 3 years ago
    Highly Intellectual People Hovering Over Politics

    Highly Intellectual People Hovering Over Politics

    1975There I was, standing in the crowd cheering for the fact the war was over, and our troops were leaving Vietnam. Defeated, it felt as though America was going through a drought. I felt so sad that we had lost so many, but our patriotism was strong; I could tell you that much. I walked through the streets of New York City, looking to find meaning for all I have been going through. As I walked, I thought to myself how thankful I was for music. I couldn’t wait to get home and play my Captain and Tennille record, my personal favorite was “Love Will Keep Us Together”. What this world needed was a bit of love. I felt lost in a country which had strived off of unity. I, for one, had never seen our communities so divided. I thought to myself the one thing I was always able to lean on was music. I didn’t listen to much rock. My folks were big on church. I listened to a lot of gospel, and hours of blues tracks. Back then, I didn’t have much of a choice in what I was listening to. Come the late 70s, Bambaataa was the “firestarter of the hip-hop generation” (Chang 2005, 92). Hip Hop came to me at a very young age. What was Hip Hop? Something so unfamiliar to the masses, to my family. Back then, Hip Hop was a total of four elements. These elements were MCing, DJing, breakdancing, and graffiti art (Alim 2004, 272). This was seen everywhere before, but none of it had come together under the umbrella that is hip hop. A way to entice a young confused generation, I had never felt more connected to a genre in my life. I grew up to be an avid believer in the messages that resonated through my Walkman in the late 70s. I saw the potential of Hip Hop. The positive impact it held on me back then stayed with me until today, the day I chose to write about this growing memory of Hip Hop. Let’s be real, Hip Hop was created here, created in my city. “It's widely accepted that hip hop was born about 40 years ago at a Bronx house party on Aug. 11, 1973” (Lebeau 2013, 1). I felt it was essential to model what I had associated Rap to. Run DMC, huge in the 1970s, portrayed the ultimate look for B-boy fashion. As soon as I familiarized myself enough with what Run DMC was about, all I could rock were Adidas track pants with the sweater, bucket hats, with a whole lotta jewelry. I myself adored the Nike Cortez sneakers, which became huge after the 72 Olympics. I guess there was just something about Hip Hop that made me happy; Hip Hop made me feel hip, isn’t that ironic?
  • E.F. Landeros
    Published 3 years ago
    Blue Christmas: The Letter of '76

    Blue Christmas: The Letter of '76

    Elvis Presley is known to be the most noted, sung about, wrote about singer the world has ever known. We know so much of the man who we have come to call the "King of Rock and Roll." But no matter how many books, articles, biographies, interviews you have heard and read Elvis himself would be heard telling his closest friends and confidants. "They know me, but they don't know me."
  • Angel Soto
    Published 3 years ago
    The History of The DJ

    The History of The DJ

    I know this might seem like a stretch, but I am going to call Thomas Edison the first DJ ever. He certainly didn't rock parties like the DJs we know today, but it is safe to say that his invention of the phonographic cylinder paved the way for future Disk Jockeys everywhere. The phonographs that followed Edison’s invention were eventually mass produced. This became the first time in history the general public was able to purchase and own recorded music. Prior to this if you wanted to hear music you would have to play it yourself, or listen to someone else play it live.