Victoria Tunney

Victoria Tunney

I love writing short fictions, especially horror, fantasy, and historical fiction. Previously published in The Last Line literary journal 2016 with 'Witchlight' and The Last Line literary journal 2017 with 'Faded Memories'

How does it work?
  • Victoria Tunney
    Published 4 months ago
    A Promise Kept

    A Promise Kept

    Rebecca drummed her long fingers against the dark wood, glaring at the row of gentlemen seated across from her. They had been at this current argument for roughly 4 hours now and were no closer to a solution than they had been at the start. Her daughter was not some piece of carpet or a prize pig ready for market, and her temper had nearly reached its limit. Magdalene was nearly 15 and, as of yet, no suitable husband had been found for her. She was a plain and homely girl, taking after her father in all ways, but this was hardly the issue. A son would marry whomever his father decided on, the problem was her dowry. Lord Ranolf had been a good and kind man, but a poor marshal of his lands, leaving Rebecca and their child almost penniless.
  • Victoria Tunney
    Published 4 months ago
    Escaping the Cage

    Escaping the Cage

    Marbella Ashbrooke had been given the duty of watching her younger sister that day but as usual, Luciella had wandered off after playing in the kitchen garden. Marbella rushed to the gate at the far end of the wall, heart pounding as she shot out into the bright evening sunlight. This wasn't the first time Luciella had vanished but something felt different. Even Lady Ashbrook, a woman not given to panic or nervousness, had all but thrown her younger children to the maids and raced out to join the search. When Marbella had sent a nursemaid back to the bower to report Luciella's escape, Lady Judith had gone wild with worry exclaiming how she had known something was wrong before the maid entered. Father had pulled together every available man, woman, and teenager to search for the girl who had been happily playing at midday and was now nowhere to be seen in the fading light. A small army of people were now racing around the manor and its grounds, striking Marbella like the nymphs and sprites from her books as they darted back and forth. Long shadows had begun to stretch across the grounds from the forest beyond the house and the air had become so tense that Marbella found it hard to breathe.
  • Victoria Tunney
    Published 2 years ago
    Lost in Time

    Lost in Time

    They've started to notice. I have to hand it to them, it was quicker than the last family. Only today, I heard the father muttering that he must be going insane. After all, why would anyone leave car keys on top of a wardrobe? I can't help it, I like the way they jiggle when I shift them around the house. It's not like there's anything else I can do. The boy, Leon, is hardly around, college some place up north, but his sister Emily is my age and still living at home. I like watching Emily and her friends, with their make-overs and dress swapping, but I can never be a part of that. I can't leave the house either, so following her on a day-out into town is out of the question. All my friends grew old and died centuries ago. My family left the house not long after my accident, too many memories I suppose. Mother became so emotional, especially when she came across anything that was once mine, and Father, well, he became a volatile mess of the proud man he was. They tried for months, pretending that everything was fine and that they had grieved for their girl, but it never healed. God above, I took long enough to come to terms with where and what I was. In an eavesdropped conversation, 3 weeks after my funeral, I finally found out how I had died. Turned out that my fiance, Jimmy Fellon, the banker's son, had upturned the cart whilst bringing me home from town. He was running the horse down the embankment to my parent's farm when the wheel snagged, pitching me forward and straight under a galloping horse. I was apparently killed outright, which my unwilling informer pressed would be a comfort to my family. So only 8 months after they buried me, my parents sold up and headed east with my siblings for a new life far from the pain. The people I once knew stopped by a few times when the new family arrived but it got too depressing to see them growing older with each visit, or bringing their own families to the house after church, so I stopped watching.