gender roles

A look at the evolution of gender roles, from Leave It to Beaver, paternity leave, female breadwinners and more.

  • Ada Zuba
    Published 2 years ago
    The Struggles of Being a Woman

    The Struggles of Being a Woman

    Recently, we celebrated the day called "International Women's Day" in Poland; this day is almost as, or maybe even more so, important than Mother's Day. I feel that Mother's Day has become over-commercialized and it makes Father's Day look a little sad. Anyways, that is a whole different topic. Today, I want to share with you the fears that women have when going to places alone.
  • Blaise Terese
    Published 2 years ago
    The Princess

    The Princess

    The Princess: A Play in One Act
  • Marielle Sabbag
    Published 2 years ago
    Gender Roles in Edgar Allen Poe

    Gender Roles in Edgar Allen Poe

    Edgar Allen Poe never wrote many female figures into his novels. If he did feature female characters, they were either unimportant to the story or killed off. Poe was a mysterious man who went through a lot of hardships. His biological mother died when he was only three, his adopted mom died from tuberculosis, and his marriages didn’t end well. Poe rarely had a female figure throughout his life, which may account to why there are so few women in his stories. All his stories seem to have a male lead, but over time critics have speculated that his story The Tell-Tale Heart may have a female narrator. When studying the text closely, there is no textual evidence that supports the narrator of the story is in fact male.
  • Amanda Gabrielle
    Published 2 years ago
    If a Boy Doesn't Like You, You Still Have to Like Yourself

    If a Boy Doesn't Like You, You Still Have to Like Yourself

    To the girl who's reading this. I know you. Hell, I am you. You are the girl that swipes right on Tinder hoping you will come across that one guy who will say he isn't just looking for some "fun." You're the girl who believes what these guys tell you. Whether they tell you that you're the most "beautiful girl they have ever seen" or that they would "love to wake up to those green eyes in the morning."
  • Reigning Women
    Published 2 years ago
    The Number One Thing We Need to Stop Teaching Little Girls...

    The Number One Thing We Need to Stop Teaching Little Girls...

    When I was a little girl, I was always confused by the directions given to me by my parents, grandparents, and other elder family members.
  • Michael Writes
    Published 2 years ago
    Mansplaining to Men

    Mansplaining to Men

    A heated conversation in a bustling city pub inspired me to write this article. I'm fed up of explaining to other men my views on feminism. Too many men see the ever common discussions on sexism and women's rights as an attack on their masculinity. But this simply isn't the case.
  • Joseline Burns
    Published 2 years ago
    Sexism: Reality or Fiction?

    Sexism: Reality or Fiction?

    You've heard the saying, "The more things change, the more they stay the same." This statement holds true in the sports arena when it comes to the differences between male and female athletes. In today’s world, female athletes are learning the hard way that even if they train harder than their male counterparts and out-perform them, they will still not receive the same recognition or money that the guys make.
  • Daveline Mompoint
    Published 2 years ago
    'The Story of an Hour'

    'The Story of an Hour'

    The Story of an Hour is a short story published by Kate Chopin in 1800s. The story is set on the protagonist, Louis Mallard and her marriage with Brently Mallard that shapes much of the story later on. The story unfolds after Louis hears about the death of her husband in a train accident. She is informed of this tragic news by her sister, Josephine. Upon hearing this, Louis is devastated and promptly rushes upstairs to her room where she locks herself up. Louise takes a seat and watches out an open window. She sees trees, smells drawing nearer rain, and hears a seller shouting out what he's offering. She hears somebody singing and also the hints of sparrows, and there are fleecy white mists in the sky. She is youthful, with lines around her eyes. As yet crying, she looks into the separation. She feels uneasy and tries to smother the building feelings inside of her, yet can't. She starts rehashing the word "free" to herself again and again. Her heart thumps rapidly, and she feels warm.
  • Matthew Evans
    Published 2 years ago
    American Woman as Wage Earner

    American Woman as Wage Earner

    The test for whether or not you can hold a job should not be the arrangement of your chromosomes. ~Bella Abzug
  • Denise Willis
    Published 2 years ago
    A Woman Is...

    A Woman Is...

    What does it mean to be a woman? There are many meanings, and different meanings depending on the woman. I have my own beliefs, which may or may not be the same as another person's, but here they are.
  • Jonathan Draper
    Published 2 years ago
    Why Dating Is Expensive for Women and How to Save Money

    Why Dating Is Expensive for Women and How to Save Money

    There's a perception that most of the expenses involved with dating rest on the man's shoulders. Couples do "go Dutch" when it comes to settling bills, but traditional attitudes persist, with men insisting on paying for meals, taxi rides, concert tickets, and so on. At least during the early stages, after connecting on matchmaking service or in some more conventional social setting. But the business of dating is actually so much more expensive for the woman. They can't just spend 15 minutes getting trimmed at the barber, shower, throw on a shirt and trousers, and then turn up.
  • Natalie Santana
    Published 2 years ago
    What Does It Mean to Be a Woman?

    What Does It Mean to Be a Woman?

    Nowadays thanks to the World Wide Web anyone, much like the good Generation Z-er I am, has an endless black hole of knowledge right at our fingertips wherever we are in the world. Whether one may think it’s a good or a bad thing, there’s simply no hiding from it. When trying to conceive an answer for what it means to be a woman, I trusted my handy pal Google to help me out. Much to my lack of surprise, the results were nothing to shake your tail feather at. It’s easy to find the few recurring blogs from singular perspectives or an array of online articles. Each piece is found to be discussing stereotypes, hormones, psychology, or biology. How IS it that such an intricate and varied group of powerful people are condensed into fitting sterile categories? These categories with little to no mention of what lies beneath these things? Brushed under a rug to be left as nothing but a list of certain criteria and criticisms. Is being a woman really chalked up to being only a superficial idea? I stumbled across a question that had no definitive answer; a question that I realized is nearly absent from our current world conversations.