career

The housewife stereotype has long since shattered - it's all about leaning in, breaking the glass ceiling, closing the wage gap and more.

  • Andrea Van Scoyoc
    Published 2 years ago
    The Funeral Industry

    The Funeral Industry

    What’s a woman’s role in the funeral industry? From my view, nothing of any respect.
  • Mallory Jones
    Published 2 years ago
    Societal Expectations

    Societal Expectations

    I’m 21-years-old, and I’m alive and well in the year 2018. A time to be alive for a woman. Being able to own property is cool, being able to receive an education, being treated as a person instead of an object (most of the time), and having fundamental human freedoms. Why is it, that in 2018, I still feel like I must choose between having a relationship and a career? It’s one or the other, right? That’s how we’ve all been trained.
  • Kennedy Kovalick
    Published 2 years ago
    Confessions of a Feminist

    Confessions of a Feminist

    After rolling out of bed, I pick out my outfit for the day, I work at 5. Shorts or jeans? Low cut shirt or just a regular tee shirt?
  • Jovelle Avancena
    Published 2 years ago
    Inspiring Women Who Work in Tech

    Inspiring Women Who Work in Tech

    I never identified as a girl—not primarily, anyway. To me, I was "Jovelle"—and I happened to be born with the reproductive organs associated with the word "female." I didn’t really care that I was a girl, didn’t care if others were or were not girls, and gender roles weren’t a big deal to me. If you're wondering why traditional gender roles are dying out, picture me.
  • Maura Dudas
    Published 3 years ago
    The Concerning Trend of Our Bodies and Image Becoming Commodities

    The Concerning Trend of Our Bodies and Image Becoming Commodities

    For my university project, I had to pick a study and design an academic poster about the topic. This is basically a colourful illustration of the findings of the experiment with charts, illustrations, and huge headers. You know, teachers forcing us to do something "fun" and creative between a 1,500 word lab report and a 4,000 word essay.
  • Iria Vasquez-Paez
    Published 3 years ago
    Equal Work for Equal Pay

    Equal Work for Equal Pay

    I believe in radical changes with equal work, equal pay. Women get paid less than a man in many areas of work. Feminism seeks to level the playing field. Feminists want to help women climb the corporate ladder as equals to men. But in this political climate where the Republicans couldn’t stand having another liberal for president this time around, women are hard-pressed to find social equality at all. I value my brain and brawn over my body in general. I value my brains more than I value my physical attractiveness. I would much rather be known for academia than my beauty.
  • Lilliana Backman
    Published 3 years ago
    10 Inspiring Female Journalists

    10 Inspiring Female Journalists

    Compared to how it is today, in the past, the majority of women weren't taken seriously in their professions. In fact, it was pretty difficult for women to obtain higher and professional jobs, because men believed that they weren't properly equipped for them. But when women do work as professionals, they're still not being taken seriously.
  • A Fillmore
    Published 3 years ago
    Strong Woman Syndrome: Part II

    Strong Woman Syndrome: Part II

    In case you are interested, there is a part one to this story. Find it here.
  • Monica Bennett
    Published 3 years ago
    The Glass Ceiling

    The Glass Ceiling

    As of 2017, women make-up just over 50 percent of the population, and yet we still haven't reached equality in either pay rate or job status. Women earn 60 percent of all four-year college degrees and 60 percent of all Master's degrees. Law degrees? We earn 47 percent of MBA's and 48 percent of all medical degrees. and 47 percent of other specialized Master's. We comprise 47 percent of the general workforce and 49 percent of the college-educated workforce, yet we are poorly represented in the upper echelons of nearly every possible field. The massive progress of the last few decades of the 20th century has all but come to a standstill. As of 2011, we hold only nine percent of top management positions in S & P 1500 companies. As of 2016, women hold just 18 percent of S&P 1500 board seats.They are just 25 percent of executive and senior officials and managers, 9.5 percent of top earners, and 6 percent of CEOs in S&P 500 companies. Women don't fare better in law or medicine. Although females make up 45 percent of lawyers, we only make-up 22 percent of law firm partners. In medicine, we represent 37 percent of all physicians and surgeons, but only 16 percent of medical school deans. In television and film, the results are equally dismal. Women accounted for just 17 percent of all the directors, executive producers, producers, writers, cinematographers, and editors who worked on the top-grossing 250 domestic films of 2016. Many films are designed to get female viewers and yet they have only a small hand in creating them. Women were just 26 percent of all off-screen talent on broadcast networks, cable, and streaming programs during the 2015-16 season. Women of color were only 3.9 percent of the executive or senior-level officials and managers and 0.4 percent of CEOs in the companies that produce our entertainment. In 2017, after the departure of Ursula Burns as CEO of Xerox Corp., there were no African American women heading Fortune 500 companies. As recently as 2013, more than two-thirds of Fortune 500 companies had no women of color as board directors at all. So what can be done to eliminate the ceiling?
  • Mimo le Singe
    Published 3 years ago
    Women and Precarious Employment: My Thoughts

    Women and Precarious Employment: My Thoughts

    In recent years, we’ve been hearing the term “precarious” being used to describe what has become the current state of employment for many people, particularly women (especially in marginalized communities).
  • A Fillmore
    Published 3 years ago
    Strong Woman Syndrome?

    Strong Woman Syndrome?

    Last week, Monday February 26, I was diagnosed with Strong Woman Syndrome. My face remained expressionless and then I blinked my eyes as I stared in to the eyes of my diagnoser. I thought to myself, "Is that even a real thing? I have to Google that and see what that is exactly." And then I smugly thought to myself, "I’ll take that as a compliment.” I hope he didn’t mistake me blinking my eyes as batting my eyelashes, eww.
  • Story Bored
    Published 3 years ago
    Sexism: Not Just a Boy's Club

    Sexism: Not Just a Boy's Club

    You've made it to the second interview, assured that this is nothing more than a preliminary meet and greet with your new administration. You feel confident, celebratory, and ready to get through this last step and get back to work. Two minutes into this interview, you realize that this person sitting in front of you decided before you even walked into the room that you were not going be hired. Your experience and education far surpasses hers and you are well-liked by everyone else who has met you in this office—this may have injured you, but your gender, well, that was the kill shot.