history

Past politicians, legislation and political movements have changed the course of history in ways both big and small. Welcome to our blast to the past.

  • Kent Prion
    Published 2 days ago
    On Hegel, Marx & Du Bois

    On Hegel, Marx & Du Bois

    Though all three of our philosophers see self-conscious thought as impacted by our social position, their particular way of expressing this varies. In the case of Hegel, he exemplifies his ideas with what is now called the Master-Slave Dialectic. In this piece, Hegel argues that when two individuals meet one another, a battle ensues between the parties to see who will become subservient to the other (who will become the master and who will become the slave to the master). In this process, the master establishes his self-conscious by imposing himself upon the slave, who in turn establishes his own self-conscious through his subservience to the master. However, one finds a paradox immediately in the idea of establishing a self-consciousness in relation to the subservience of one to himself - and on the other hand, establishing a self-consciousness in relation to being subservient to the other - as the self-conscious of an object necessarily implies some awareness of self, as a subject, which is separate from the perceived object. Hegel is aware of this contradiction, and so requires that a change in the relationship between master and slave must take place. He does so by stating that the
  • Darrius Dickerson
    Published 6 days ago
    "The Generals of the American Military Would Be Forgiven..."

    "The Generals of the American Military Would Be Forgiven..."

    Right around the time of what would've been a celebration of the late, great Dr. King's ninety-first Born Day, it seems only fitting to revisit his legacy and whatnot.
  • Fahim Vohra
    Published 7 days ago
    Early Cultures In America

    Early Cultures In America

    Early Cultures in the America
  • Jade Neal
    Published 15 days ago
    Categorizing Guilt in the Holocaust
  • Louis Fell
    Published 16 days ago
    Can and Should Psychology Be Used to Explain the Holocaust.

    Can and Should Psychology Be Used to Explain the Holocaust.

    Upon watching a Holocaust documentary or hearing from a holocaust survivor, one of the many questions that will no doubt be on people’s minds is “how could it happen? How could people sanction and carry out the systematic murder of 6 million people?” The truth is that there are many observations, studies and experiments that attempt to answer that question, but I question whether we study this enough in mainstream Holocaust education. The most common explanations look at societal factors such as the rigorous Nazi propaganda machine that slowly dehumanized the Jews and allowed for the escalation of violence in the years to come, but I don’t believe that this definitively answers the question. Surely mere posters and speeches cannot fill the void between disliking someone because of their religion, which is a common phenomenon in human history, and being able to shoot them dead at point-blank range or lead them into a gas chamber. I Want to explore psychology’s take on the Holocaust and how those closest to the violence and brutality not only went along with it, but actively participated.
  • Cheryl E
    Published 21 days ago
    Interesting Facts About Joan of Arc

    Interesting Facts About Joan of Arc

    Joan of Arc was just 19 years old when she was burned at the stake. She was born on January 6th 1412 and departed this life on May 30th 1431. When she was 13, Joan began having visions where she was leading France to victory over England. She was a simple peasant girl who could neither read nor write, but this did not stop her faith in her visions. At 16 she rejected a arranged marriage, and instead took a vow of chastity in order to complete her mission to depose king Henry VI. She believed that the voice of God was leading her and would let nothing stand in her way. Joan's birth name was Jeanne d’Arc, (Joan of Arc in English) and her father was a tenant farmer named Jacques d’Arc. Joan's dad was from the village of Domrémy, in northeastern France.
  • Cheryl E
    Published 23 days ago
    10 Important Facts About Dr. Martin Luther King

    10 Important Facts About Dr. Martin Luther King

    Had he lived, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. would have been 90 years old on January 15th 2020. Each year at this time he is celebrated and there are television movies that chronicle his life and death. Many churches around the nation have programs to showcase the things he accomplished in his 39 short years on this planet. There are many well known facts about this Baptist preacher turned civil rights activist and there are also others that are little know. Following are 10 interesting items that relate to the life of Dr. King. Check off the ones you are familiar with and take note of those you were not aware of.
  • A. Alexis Kreiser
    Published 26 days ago
    A Few Things You Forgot Happened In 2019

    A Few Things You Forgot Happened In 2019

    Ah, 2019. What a year. It was...long and...uh...that's all I can think of right now: it was long. It was so long, that so many things happened, that I can't remember what happened at the beginning of the year. Hell, I can't even remember what happened at the beginning of the day! That's how bad it is. So, with that, here are a few things that you might have forgotten that happened in 2019.
  • Landon Girod
    Published 2 months ago
    How We Can Use Moral Ethics to Justify Killing Baby Hitler (With a Time Machine of Course)

    How We Can Use Moral Ethics to Justify Killing Baby Hitler (With a Time Machine of Course)

    In this crazy complex world we live in, I think we can all agree on two things as being absolute. Tacos are delicious, and Adolph Hitler was a bad dude. Many have discussed what it would be like if Hitler had been killed before he committed his disgusting crimes on humanity. One such idea is going back in time to kill Hitler as a baby. The idea turned into a question that is a thought-provoking one, getting various answers from different people. Many deciding that killing baby Hitler would be an easy task.
  • Robert Turner
    Published 2 months ago
    The Secretive City That Is Home to Britain’s New Empire

    The Secretive City That Is Home to Britain’s New Empire

    Deep in the heart of London, in an area occupying just over one square mile, lies the City of London. It is the oldest part of London which was originally named Londinium by its founders, the Romans. The City is home to London’s financial sector and boasts the Bank of England, the London Stock Exchange and the Royal Courts of Justice as but a few of its eminent tenants.
  • Robert Bowen
    Published 2 months ago
    The Truths Were Self-Evident

    The Truths Were Self-Evident

    One of the first things a child learns in school is the most quoted line from the Declaration of Independence: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness.”
  • Shandi Pace
    Published 2 months ago
    Examining Robert F. Kennedy’s Greatest Speech

    Examining Robert F. Kennedy’s Greatest Speech

    On April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. was tragically shot by James Earl Ray outside of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. While the country went up in flames, there was a calming voice that arose from the ashes. That very same night, Robert F. Kennedy gave one of the greatest speeches by any American politician over the last 100 years. On what would be Kennedy's 94th birthday, let's take a look at the politician's most heartfelt and progressive statement of his entire career.