book reviews

Reviews for political die-hards of books about politicians, civil rights, Supreme Court rulings and the ever-changing Swamp.

  • Annie Kapur
    Published 2 days ago
    Book Review: "How to Destroy America in Three Easy Steps" by Ben Shapiro

    Book Review: "How to Destroy America in Three Easy Steps" by Ben Shapiro

    Ben Shapiro’s introduction to his new book “How to Destroy America in Three Easy Steps” begins with capturing the very depths of the free-thinking mind of the new generation of political libertarians, liberals and conservatives alike. He ignites conversation, question and rethinking with his incredible argument that America moves towards disengagement and misinformation. Shapiro proves to be back on top form with his book “The Right Side of History” being a massive success and, from a readers point of view whether you like him or not, you have to admit that he knows what he’s talking about. As America tries to uphold herself in her 250 year civil rights’ history since the war, Shapiro lets us all in on a secret: that we are the problem and yet, we are also the solution. His writing style is clear, concise and consistent with a man who proves that ethics and morals, standards and cultural traditions seem to arise over conflict, mass mob culture, labelling and chaos. As both the right and the left of the American Political slip into chaos, Ben Shapiro is there explaining why they are both completely wrong.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 6 days ago
    "The Prince" by Niccolo Machiavelli

    "The Prince" by Niccolo Machiavelli

    I first read this book as an early teen after hearing the word “machiavellian” pop up around public figures at the time like George Bush Jr. and Tony Blair (yes, I grew up in that era). I had no idea what this word meant as a thirteen-year-old and so, when I looked it up and saw that it was related to a person, I was looking through the works by him in no time. When I first found the list, I was initially thinking about reading the “Discourses on Livy” and when I realised I had to look up a word in the title, I proceeded on to an easier title: “The Prince” is what I read instead. Honestly, I’m glad I chose this one first because it really does explain a lot. It is written quite simply and so, I didn’t need to do much looking up, annotating and researching. I noticed immediately that the first part concerns gaining power and the second part concerns maintaining it. I can honestly say that I was shocked that many political figures were actually so much like this in real life - especially concerning the second half of the book. When I re-read it, I like to concentrate a lot of my attention on to Chapters 17-19 because these are the ones I believe to hold the key to the machiavellian identity. When I went to university, I was 20-years-old when I wrote my essay on machiavellian authorities and powers on the Renaissance stage and how they had an impact on to how certain characters of a play were viewed. If we apply this to real life, we can’t actually be much further from the truth as a machiavellian is not a particularly villainous person or a psychopath - just one who knows how to gain and maintain power and they know how to do it very well. I have read this book over ten times in my life and I still own the first copy I bought when I was thirteen (it is the same copy I re-read). It now contains various annotations from over the years and never fails to shock me into realising what people will do for power, some of the quotations are absolutely timeless in every sense of the word. They will make you shudder to see that the rules of the machiavellian prince are applicable from every world leader from the malevolent Genghis Khan to the charismatic golden-boy, Barack Obama.
  • Shannon Popov
    Published 19 days ago
    Reflections on White Fragility

    Reflections on White Fragility

    Yes it’s a book. A book that every well-meaning white liberal has run out to buy in the past few weeks, pushing it to the very top of the NY Times best seller list.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 27 days ago
    5 Books About the French Revolution

    5 Books About the French Revolution

    On the 14th of July, 1789, the people of France took matters into their own hands for once and stormed the Bastille Prison, reducing it to nothing as an act of revolution against the monarchy - Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. After this, there were riots, acts of violence and war against their current regime. It was a revolution that would, along the way, eat itself up and be thrown back up with incredible irony.
  • angie fernando
    Published 2 months ago
    Second Place in Lifelong Learning Challenge
    Tomorrow, Tomorrow, and Tomorrow

    Tomorrow, Tomorrow, and Tomorrow

    “Tomorrow, Tomorrow, and Tomorrow” is an essay written by Aldous Huxley, and it can be found in his book called Tomorrow, Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, which can be purchased here, here, and here.
  • Kathryn Milewski
    Published 2 months ago
    Why Everyone Should Read "A Piece of Cake" by Cupcake Brown

    Why Everyone Should Read "A Piece of Cake" by Cupcake Brown

    TRIGGER WARNING: the following review discusses some graphic and severe elements of Cupcake Brown's memoir, "A Piece of Cake." While some details may be disturbing, it is important to talk about them, as they pertain to systemic injustice we the people are trying to overcome. Thank you.
  • Cheryl E Preston
    Published 2 months ago
    Race relations lessons learned later in life

    Race relations lessons learned later in life

    Long before Alex Haley wrote “Roots” and later “Queen,” author Margaret Walker produces a little known gem titled “Jubilee” in 1966. I found this rare treasure in a box of discontinued paper back books at a local library in 2015. I paid one dime for this published work that has changed my life and challenged what I thought I knew about American slavery. It has given me a different perspective and helped me realize there were other victims besides the enslaved Africans. I have read this book at least 25 to 30 times from cover to cover because it speaks to me and it’s message is relevant today.
  • Sustainable Scott
    Published 2 months ago
    Lifelong Learning

    Lifelong Learning

    A Story of Race and Inheritance . This is the autobiography of Barack Obama. It's a story of the dreams of his father and grandparents , who had hope to live in a world in which race did not matter. It comes on as the movement in the 60s, the integration of spirit, the notion we could create a more just and equal nation , with harmony and equality for all. He describes how the dream of his family kind of fell away with the country as a whole but he somehow held onto it and rekindled it as a fire in his own heart.
  • Alana Boyles
    Published 2 months ago
    Our House is On Fire: Scenes of a Family and a Planet in Crisis

    Our House is On Fire: Scenes of a Family and a Planet in Crisis

    Recently I finished reading the Ernman-Thunberg (as in Greta Thunberg) family's memoir and wow... It was a total doozy. Our House is On Fire tells the story of the events that led up to Greta Thunberg's school strike for the climate on August 20th, 2018. As hard as it would be to cover any four years in just 222 pages, the four years in question for the Thunbergs are some of the craziest. So many changes, so many struggles, so many fears & dark days, and so much action. More than anything, this book is a guide to getting back on your feet after life knocks you down. And none have been more so knocked than Malena Ernman upon having to watch first one daughter and then the other get bullied in school, receive life-altering diagnoses, and develop life threatening eating disorders. About more than just the young girl who started the World's largest climate strike by sitting alone in front of the Swedish Parliament building, Our House is an insider's view on the good, the bad, and the ugly that took the Thunbergs from a simple Swedish family ruled by their internationally-renowned opera singer mother's tour schedule to an internationally-despised family led by their eldest daughter, her deep concern for the health of the planet we all call home, and her unyielding faith that humanity is not evil.
  • Claire Amy Handscombe
    Published 2 months ago
    3 Great Novels (and more) about Political Campaigns

    3 Great Novels (and more) about Political Campaigns

    In the summer of 2009, I fell in love with the English language and American politics at the same time. I have Aaron Sorkin’s The West Wing to thank for that. As a child and pre-teen, I read voraciously and wrote prolifically, but when we moved to England and my mother tongue, French, began to rust, so did my love of language. Sorkin convinced me that English could be elegant. He also showed me how exciting — how glamorous, how romantic — politics could be. Or could, at least, appear.
  • Ashley Nestler, MSW
    Published 2 months ago
    3 Books to Read If the George Floyd Case Has You Fired Up

    3 Books to Read If the George Floyd Case Has You Fired Up

    So, I don’t know about you, but 2020 has been one heck of a year so far (to put it lightly). It seems like time has flown by, but so many things have happened that it is hard to keep track of the days. I have been struggling with my mental health for the past year and have been trying my best to manage it through COVID-19; however, I have felt a fire growing within me as things have escalated, and when the George Floyd case came to light, I just about exploded.
  • Phillip Merrill
    Published 2 months ago
    Big Brother In The Twenty-First Century

    Big Brother In The Twenty-First Century

    Big Brother in the Twenty-First Century