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Does the Navy salute officers when wearing Kevlar helmets?

by ww tactical 7 months ago in navy
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The United States Marine Corps has their own protocol for saluting. The enlisted member will salute the officer by touching their forehead with their right hand and their left hand is held in the position of a salute.

If you have been watching the news lately, you may have seen reports of the Navy returning to the use of kevlar in their helmets.

Kevlar is a poly-aramid fiber that is woven into a strong, lightweight material that is heat resistant.

The Navy and the Marine Corps had previously switched to the use of this material from fiberglass. Fiberglass is very good at absorbing the impact of a hard hit, but it is much heavier than kevlar. It also is prone to breaking.

"You see the helmet, you salute the man. When a sailor gets a helmet he or she is no longer a seaman, they are an officer. In essence, they salute because of their position. You can apply this to anyone who puts on a helmet because of the increased need for head protection from injuries, etc.

Traditionally, the military salute is a gesture of respect.

The traditions and history of military salutes differ from country to country and between services.

In the United States Military, the highest ranking officer party on board a naval command vessel or flying an aircraft would have all personnel stop what they are doing, salute him, and resume their duties after he has passed by. In 2007 President George W. Bush stopped this practice due to security concerns.

In the United States Armed Forces, military personnel who are wearing Kevlar helmets salute officers by touching their forehead with their right hand fingers while wearing the helmet. Proper gloves should be worn with a reflective band to indicate rank of colonel or below for officers and captains or below for enlisted service members according to a U.S Navy SEALs guide.

On some occasions, a salute is only given to the person of highest rank or title, such as the president, vice president, general, admiral, etc. The saluting party is not required to give a salute unless the person they are saluting returns it.

On the American mainland, military salutes are often followed by a hand-held clicker, which is an electronic device which sends an electrical pulse to the finger and brain which causes a voluntary movement of the fingers and head. The sound and/or feeling is almost identical to the actual salute.

The use of a hand-held clicker is voluntary for the military member. The USMC has instituted a mandatory use of the clicker.

Does the Navy Salute the Officer or the Enlisted Member?

The United States Navy, United States Marine Corps, and United States Coast Guard have the same salute for officers and enlisted personnel.

The officer and enlisted members of the military salute by touching their forehead with their right hand and their left hand is held in the position of a salute. The gesture for an enlisted member is more akin to a salute than a salute.

Saluting in the USMC

The United States Marine Corps has their own protocol for saluting. The enlisted member will salute the officer by touching their forehead with their right hand and their left hand is held in the position of a salute.

Does the Navy salute officers when wearing Kevlar helmets?

The United States Navy, United States Marine Corps, and United States Coast Guard salute officers by touching their forehead with their right hand and their left hand is held in the position of a salute.

The gesture for an enlisted member is more akin to a salute than a salute.

Saluting in the USMC

The United States Marine Corps has their own protocol for saluting. The enlisted member will salute the officer by touching their forehead with their right hand and their left hand is held in the position of a salute.

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