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The fortune cookie orgin is actually Japanese

by Michael B about a month ago in history
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The history of the fortune cookie

Info https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fortune_cookie A japanese man named Makoto Hagiwara claimed to of invented the fortune cookie.He's reported to have been the first person in the U.S. to have served the present version of the cookie when he did so at his tea garden in the 1890s or early 1900s. The fortune cookies were made by a San Francisco bakery, Benkyodo.

A Chinese man by the name of David Jung, founder of the Hong Kong Noodle Company in Los Angeles, has made a competing claim that he first invented the cookie in 1918.The San Francisco Court of Historical Review attempted to settle the disagreement in 1983. During the hearings, a fortune cookie was brought as a piece of evidence with the message S.F. Judge who rules for L.A. Not Very Smart Cookie".The court ended up ruling in favor of San Francisco.Subsequently, the city of Los Angeles condemned the decision.

Seiichi Kito,of Los Angeles, also claims to have invented the cookie. Kito claims to have gotten the idea of putting a message in a cookie from Omikuji (fortune slip) which are sold at temples and shrines in Japan. According to his story, he sold his cookies to Chinese restaurants where they were liked very much with alot of enthusiasm in both the Los Angeles and San Francisco areas.A Chinese man by the name of David Jung, founder of the Hong Kong Noodle Company in Los Angeles, has made a competing claim that he first invented the cookie in 1918.The San Francisco Court of Historical Review attempted to settle the disagreement in 1983. During the hearings, a fortune cookie was brought as a piece of evidence with the message S.F. Judge who rules for L.A. Not Very Smart Cookie".The court ended up ruling in favor of San Francisco.Subsequently, the city of Los Angeles condemned the decision.

Seiichi Kito,of Los Angeles, also claims to have invented the cookie. Kito claims to have gotten the idea of putting a message in a cookie from Omikuji (fortune slip) which are sold at temples and shrines in Japan. According to his story, he sold his cookies to Chinese restaurants where they were liked very much with alot of enthusiasm in both the Los Angeles and San Francisco areas.

Fortune cookies moved from being dominated by Japanese-Americans to one dominated by Chinese-Americans sometime around World War II. One theory for why this occurred is because of the Japanese American internment during World War II, which forcibly put over 100,000 Japanese-Americans in internment camps, including those who had produced fortune cookies. This

Fortune cookies before the early 20th century were all made by hand. The fortune cookie industry changed dramatically after the fortune cookie machine was invented by Shuck Yee from Oakland, California.[9] The machine allowed for mass production of fortune cookies which subsequently allowed the cookies to drop in price to become the novelty and courtesy dessert many Americans are familiar with after their meals at most Chinese restaurants today.

Fortune cookies before the early 20th century were all made by hand. The fortune cookie industry changed dramatically after the fortune cookie machine was invented by Shuck Yee from Oakland, California.[9] The machine allowed for mass production of fortune cookies which subsequently allowed the cookies to drop in price to become the novelty and courtesy dessert many Americans are familiar with after their meals at most Chinese restaurants today.

There are also multi-cultural versions of the fortune cookie. For instance, the Mexican version of the fortune cookie, called the "Lucky Taco", is a red taco-shaped cookie with a fortune inside.The same company that makes the Lucky Taco also makes a "Lucky Cannoli", inspired by Italian cannolis.

There are approximately 3 billion fortune cookies made each year globally, the majority of them consumed in the US. The largest manufacturer of the cookies is Wonton Food, Inc., headquartered in Brooklyn, New York. They make over 4.5 million fortune cookies per day. Other large manufacturers are Baily International in the Midwest and Peking Noodle in Los Angeles. There are other smaller, local manufacturers including Tsue Chong Co. in Seattle, Keefer Court Food in Minneapolis, Sunrise Fortune Cookie in Philadelphia, and Golden Gate Fortune Cookie Factory in San Francisco. Many smaller companies will also sell custom fortunes.

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Michael B

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  • Mark zabout a month ago

    That's something I did not know

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