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Queen Victoria- world's first known medical marijuana patient.

by Maria Ostasevici 14 days ago in history

cannabis was used since "Victorian Age" like a treat for many problems

Queen Victoria, who ruled the British Empire from 1837 to 1901, was the longest reigning monarch in England. Victoria's medical team prescribed marijuana for menstrual pain.

Cannabis has been around for thousands of years. Clothing, therapeutic medicinal and dietary use have been benefits that mankind has taken advantage of this powerful plant for centuries. It is considered sacred by many cultures and is used in rituals to this day. Let's take a closer look at the history of cannabis and its spread to conquer the world.

Cannabis helps millions of people around the world, but especially for women, and not only today.

Documents supporting the medical benefits of marijuana first appeared in 2900 but the medicinal cannabis in Europe owes an Irish man who succeeded. Born in 1809, Dr. William Brooke O'Shaughnessy invented the modern treatment for cholera, installed the first telegraph system in Asia, contributed to inventions in underwater engineering, and truly pioneered the use of medical cannabis in Europe. Inspired by the use of cannabis in Persian medicine, O'Shaughnessy conducted the first clinical trials of marijuana to treat rheumatism, hydrophobia, cholera, tetanus, and seizures.

This is one of the most exciting episodes in the history of medical marijuana: Queen Victoria, a symbol of modesty and conservatism (although she does not deserve that reputation), may have received cannabis to relieve menstrual cramps. His personal physician and the source of cannabis was Sir J. Russell Reynolds, who wrote in 1890 that "with careful use, [cannabis] is one of the most valuable medicines we have."

However, it is believed that she was not aroused: it seems that Reynolds prescribed cannabis tinctures, liquid concentrations of the drug, which at the time was the most common means of taking the drug (and many others). Cannabis tinctures are currently experiencing a resurgence in cannabis medical centers and in states where marijuana is legal. They are injected with a dropper under the tongue, and it takes very little to feel the effect. We can only hope that this helped Victoria to cope with the difficulties.

Queen Victoria, a symbol of modesty and conservatism (although she does not deserve that reputation), may have received cannabis to relieve menstrual cramps. His personal physician and the source of cannabis was Sir J. Russell Reynolds, who wrote in 1890 that "with careful use, (cannabis) is one of the most valuable medicines we have."

However, it is believed that she was not aroused: it seems that Reynolds prescribed cannabis tinctures, liquid concentrations of the drug, which at the time was the most common means of taking the drug (and many others). Cannabis tinctures are currently experiencing a resurgence in cannabis medical centers and in states where marijuana is legal. They are injected with a dropper under the tongue, and it takes very little to feel the effect. We can only hope that this helped Victoria to cope with the difficulties.

QUEEN VICTORIA'S MENSTRUAL CRAMPS

Queen Victoria is undoubtedly the most representative spirit of the 19th century. Indeed, his reign spanned over 63 years from 1837 to 1901, a record for longevity for a British monarch surpassed only by the current Queen Elizabeth II. In fact, to this day, the second half of the 19th century is known as the "Victorian Age".

The irony of the story is that this queen, whose name has become synonymous with puritanical conservatism and modesty, was in fact an independent woman who, contrary to the codes of aristocratic families in Europe, married for love to Prince Albert and perfectly married. life. Together they gave birth to 9 children and lived in complete harmony until Albert passed away.

We know from Queen Victoria's medical and historical records that she suffered from particularly severe menstrual cramps. Therefore, she was sometimes forced to postpone or avoid certain formal activities.

Moreover, at some point, her pains ceased to cause her suffering, although there is no unequivocal and absolute historical confirmation of this fact, the hypothesis that is considered the most likely is that this relief will come thanks to his use of cannabis.

The reason this hypothesis is probably more than a hint of truth has more to do with the personality of his personal physician, Sir John Russell Reynolds, rather than the spread of rumors and gossip at the time.

PAIN RELIEVER AND SOOTHING

Reynolds, who, like many British scientists of the time, spent time in India. As a result, he became acquainted with the cannabis plant and especially with its use in traditional medicine in the East. Reynolds has been studying this plant for 30 years and was very excited about its full potential and all its potential medicinal uses. Among other things, he stated that "the plant is effective for muscle cramps and menstrual cramps." Therefore, it is logical to assume that his most important and famous patient, who suffered from this problem, could benefit from this drug.

What Reynolds discovered in the 19th century is still valid today and is confirmed by many researchers. For example, Kim Lam, a researcher who works at the Apollo Clinic Network, confirms that in the case of menstruation with cramps and pain, the CBD component of cannabis helps to relax muscles and relieve pain, while the THC component has a synergistic effect that is amplified.

PHARAOH-STYLE NATURAL BIRTH

The earliest known evidence of the use of cannabis in the context of pregnancy and childbirth comes from Egyptian papyrus from the second millennium AD. This papyrus is dedicated to the medical practice prevalent in Egypt of the pharaohs, and where it is described that cannabis is a medicine that helps relieve pain. pain during childbirth.

In the sixth century BC, during the Roman Empire, similar cannabis use was noticed among the elite of Roman women until the collapse of the empire in the sixth century AD.

Almost everything we know about medical cannabis supports the hypothesis that, even for the modern woman, medical cannabis can make labor easier, although this is not recommended today.

No doctor in Western medicine today would prescribe medicinal cannabis to a pregnant woman. But it is noted that in many cultures around the world and throughout history, since the early 19th century, as the article explains, cannabis has been used and considered an acceptable way to treat pregnancy symptoms such as nausea.

How do you think, it is medical cannabis helping or not?

history

Maria Ostasevici

Communication and public relations student, Moldova

Instagram profile: maria.ostasevici;

mother of two awesome Dobermans.

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