What Pet Owners Should Know About Essential Oils

by Paisley Hansen 11 days ago in how to

Follow this guide to know the best essential oils for pets

What Pet Owners Should Know About Essential Oils

A lot of controversy surrounds the use of essential oils for pets. A lot of pet owners use essential oils for a cat's digestive support or their dog who's afraid of fireworks or thunderstorms.

Essential oil contains chemical compounds that evaporate quickly at room temperatures, and are extracted from plants. Essential oils are also known as ethereal or volatile oils.

Using essential oils for your pets can be part of an overall, daily regimen to help your pets live a longer and healthier life. Here's what you should know about using essential oils to keep your pets healthy and happy.

Myths About Pets And Essential Oils

Essential oils are potent because of their high concentration. Some people believe this makes the oils toxic to diffuse around pets, which isn't the case. Another common misconception is that a pet parent shouldn't pet their dog or cat after using essential oils. However, the reverse is true; petting a cat or dog after using oils is beneficial.

Two more myths about essential oils are that they can cause kidney or liver damage, and pets may die from using too much of the oils. Again, these claims are misconceptions.

Incidents of adverse reactions to essential oils are rare, and could involve a pet ingesting undiluted oils. The bottles should always be capped tightly and stored in a place that's not accessible to your pets.

If a pet has any adverse reactions to an essential oil, take them to your veterinarian or emergency clinic immediately. Reactions could include:

  • Drooling
  • Rubbing their face
  • Squinting
  • Diarrhea or vomiting
  • Shaking
  • Loud vocalization

How Can Essential Oils Help Pets?

One of the benefits of essential oils is that they have a soothing effect on pets. Shelter workers have found that using a diffuser with Lavender calms stressed pets. As far as petting your furbaby after using oils, this has a beneficial effect on a pet.

Although the oils are strong, they are volatile, and evaporate quickly. Applying oils to your pet's coat is an excellent way to calm them. When you use CPTG Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade oils, they can actually support the liver and kidneys.

Are Any Essential Oils Bad For Pets?

It's vital for any pet owner to do their research before using essential oils for their pets. Some of the ingredients contained in the oils can be toxic for pets, and should always be avoided. Some of the essential oils toxic to dogs include Tea Tree, Wintergreen, Oregano, and Thyme.

Some essential oils toxic to cats are:

  • Basil
  • Cassia
  • Cloves
  • Fennel
  • Tea Tree Oil
  • Oregano
  • Thyme
  • Sage
  • Peppermint
  • Wintergreen
  • Wild Orange
  • Lemon

If you want to use essential oils for your pet, only use Doterra CPTG. Cats have susceptible systems and oils high in phenols or eugenols should always be avoided. You should consult your veterinarian before using oils on cats if you aren't sure of the side effects.

The Best Essential Oils For Pets

One of the most important things to understand about essential oils is that although many companies make claims about their oils being "100 percent pure," this isn't always the case. Pet owners that routinely use doTerra oils for their dogs can use one oil for a variety of issues.

The oils can help with the needs of pets, as well as offer a soothing effect of keeping dogs calm. Another advantage of using essential oils for pet health issues is that they're a natural way to help your pet.

One or two drops of essential oil applied topically is enough to help alleviate a health problem. It's best not to give your pet essential oils internally before discussing it with your veterinarian. Finally, always use CPTG Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade essential oils.

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Paisley Hansen

Paisley Hansen is a freelance writer and expert in health, fitness, beauty, and fashion. When she isn’t writing she can usually be found reading a good book or hitting the gym.    

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