exotic pets

Exotic pets are wild animals gone domestic; explore the absurd, fascinating and sometimes illegal exotic pet industry.

  • Tracy Lawson
    Published 2 years ago
    Jeffrey's Story

    Jeffrey's Story

    I once had a gerbil named Jeffrey and we all called him Jeffy. He was an albino gerbil who had the run of the house. You couldn't help but love the little guy because he was so fun to have around. He was a sweet boy. Smart and I mean smart. He was so smart that he knew how to get out of his tank and leave it. I've awoken to hearing him run around his tank in the middle of the night and climbing up on his water bottle, trying to get out. This goofy boy knew how to squeeze himself out and didn't care if the height of the tank was far off the ground. He'd make to the floor and run around as if he owned the house. You would think a gerbil wouldn't be so smart, but they are. They are capable of learning quickly, especially when you're not home to stop them from leaving the tank. Jeffy decided that during the day when everyone was away, he'd climb out of his tank and go exploring around the house. At which time, Dollie, the only dog we had at the time, followed him into the master bedroom. He hid in the closest and Dollie lay there, watching him. This little sweetheart waited until someone came and got him. When my Mom and Dad came home, they weren't sure what was in the closet because of Dollie. So they opened the closest door and to their surprise was the silly gerbil, standing on his hind legs, looking at them. Apparently, Jeffy had braved through the house, all the while, keeping Dollie on her toes? Who knows? He was all right. But he sure loved to tell his "mate" Peanut all about his adventure to her. Jeffy was so bright that he would actually be the only gerbil allowed free roam. If he got himself under the washer or dryer, he'd come out for peanut butter. He always had to have peanut butter as a treat! He loved it. Jeffy was a great father and Peanut was a great mother. I went to breeding gerbils for the local pet store in exchange for food, bedding, toys, and sometimes, they'd give me money. The babies were handled daily so they were always hand-trained and used to people. I even babysat Peanut's litter while she got free time from them. She would often check on them, then run around. They'd always fall asleep in my hands. So, they were used to my scent and warmth. It was something nice. The downside with Peanut was? She bit me all the time. Jeffy lived longer than any gerbil around. He lived for six to seven years and Peanut lived for five years. They were given a lot of enrichment, love, and food blocks, seeds, and yogurt treats. Even wood blocks to chew on for their teeth since they grow. You won't find another couple of cute gerbils like Jeffy and Peanut.
  • Tamara Iwanchyshyn
    Published 2 years ago
    Axolotl Care Guide: How to Raise Axolotl for Larva to Adult

    Axolotl Care Guide: How to Raise Axolotl for Larva to Adult

    So a little while ago I made the decision to get another pair of Axolotl. The first pair worked out well, but for a multitudinous amount of reason, they died. When I looked through the internet for new axolotl, I found something interesting. I found someone selling week old axolotl larvae (the term for newly hatched axolotl) for sale. I thought that this would be a fun adventure for me. Raise a new pair of axolotl. The challenge turned out to be more then I thought it would be. I thought I would make this care guide to go through the things I wish that I had known when I got my little ones. Here is what I learned.
  • Gracie R.
    Published 2 years ago
    Top 10 Gaboon Viper Facts
  • Tracy Lawson
    Published 2 years ago
    The Frog and Other Visitors

    The Frog and Other Visitors

    I love frogs. They're so beneficial and plus they're cute. Keeping bugs away. Every year, I would get visited by a frog or frogs. When Allie, my bearded dragon passed away, a month later, a toad paid a visit to me, every day. I looked up the mystical facts about frogs and toads visiting after a death. Well, the toad signaled that I was being visited by Allie's spirit. Whenever I would come visit her grave in the backyard, the little toad was there. It didn't flee. It stayed around for the whole summer. This year, a tree frog and a toad visited me again. This time, I was able to handle both without having them pee on my hands. All toads and frogs pee when nervous or it's a defense against predators. I have been told not to handle toads because they have warts and can cause warts. Well, thankfully, it hasn't been the case with any frog or toad. I've rescued both toad and tree frog from spider webs.One particular tree frog always seems to trust me and they even traveled to the stores with me. One day after a shopping trip, he had sneaked into the trunk of my SUV. I took him back to where I had believed he should be. The next day, he was stuck in between the plastic sheeting and door. It seems he liked to be warmed up and given the same love I gave to Allie. When he was done with getting warmed up and loved, he would leave. I think he was a miracle frog and visited every night, climbing on my windows. The toad didn't return, but the tree frog always did pay a visit either to eat the bugs or to send a message.
  • Tracy Lawson
    Published 2 years ago
    Allie's Story

    Allie's Story

    Four years ago, I rescued a bearded dragon lizard named Alice. Alice turned into Allie. Allie was a sweet bearded dragon lizard. We didn't know her approximate age so we were told she was seven to nine months old. While I didn't have enough information on her, I dived right in to a world I didn't know anything about bearded dragon lizards. There is a lot of conflicting information about them and due to that conflicting information, I didn't know if I was doing everything right. When I asked her previous owner about what she ate, she told me to look it up and that was it. I went website to website, looking for information, looking for things she would need for a happy long life with me.
  • Sara Logsdon
    Published 2 years ago
    Rat Life

    Rat Life

    I have six rats; five girls and one boy. They all live together in their double Critter Nation cage. My boy is neutered so he can live with the girls. His name is Vlad and he is an albino rat. He is lazy like a good boy usually is. Then there is the youngest girl. Her name is Basha and she is an Agouti Berkshire rat. She might be slightly more cute because she was born without a tail, but we won't tell the others we think so ;). Then there is Fluffy. She is our crazy girl. She is blue and has curly hair all over. Then Ivonne; she is a black Berkshire girl. She is the boss and the mastermind behind all their naughty behavior. Then there is Corrine. She is our pretty grey variegated girl. She loves food slightly more than all the other rats. Rat number six is our girl Odette. She is a cream color and a variegated hooded rattie. She is so sweet and loves to give kisses all over the place.
  • Kathryn Cobb
    Published 2 years ago
    Procyon Lotor

    Procyon Lotor

    Raccoons. Love them? Let me tell you more. Hate them? Let me change your mind.
  • Charlie Mcloud
    Published 2 years ago
    Keeping Pets in University Halls
  • Rowan Marley
    Published 2 years ago
    10 Pets That Are Not for Beginners

    10 Pets That Are Not for Beginners

    Pet ownership can be a seriously magical experience, and it's really one that everyone should have at least once. A pet can be your best buddy and the highlight of your home life—if you treat them correctly, anyway.
  • Nanette Tenpo
    Published 2 years ago
    Dogs, Cats, Giraffes... Oh My!

    Dogs, Cats, Giraffes... Oh My!

    As an adult, I prefer to reside in the city over the country. But I must admit some of my best childhood memories come from growing up in the country or visiting my grandparent's farm! I still have memories of my uncles going hunting and watching my grandparents clean the fresh kill then prepare it for dinner throughout the week. I miss driving my dirt bike on dirt roads, mixing dirt and water to make mud pies, and letting them dry out in the sun.
  • Tamara Iwanchyshyn
    Published 2 years ago
    5 Reasons Why Axolotls Make Amazing Pets

    5 Reasons Why Axolotls Make Amazing Pets

    Axolotls are a type of fully aquatic salamanders native to Mexico. Also known as the Mexican "walking fish," they are not actual fish but are amphibians. This makes them very unique pets. In the wild, they are endangered due to habitat loss. All the axolotls in the pet trade today are born in captivity and are bred for their colors.
  • Molly Gill
    Published 2 years ago
    Bred for the Bullet

    Bred for the Bullet

    Cub petting has risen in popularity in recent years due to the increase of social media content containing wild animal encounters, rides, walks, and selfies. Wildlife tourist attractions, WTAs, showcase a range of exotic animals and experiences including cub petting, walking with lions, tiger selfies, and bear feeding. Interactions are often presented as educational and tourists are sometimes told cubs are orphans that have been taken in by the business usually masquerading as a sanctuary. This increased consumer demand for wild animal interaction has provided the perfect opportunity for WTAs to turn their animals into profit centers for a non-stop flow of customers who fuel the photo-tourism industry. Unfortunately, businesses that offer wild animal interactions operate far from the idyllic connotations that the word “sanctuary” implies. Specifically, focusing on young cubs (including lions, tigers, jaguars, bears, leopards), being subjected to the unnecessary human interaction that directly disrupts their right to a natural upbringing, resulting in serious negative consequences for the physical and mental well being of the big cats involved.