bird

A bird's eye view of a life in flight.

  • J.E. Wyatt
    Published about a month ago
    A Bird Does Birds Things

    A Bird Does Birds Things

    What is a bird, what could its existence be within our special planet? This existential question might pop some ideas. That birds are special because they contribute by beauty. They help the environment when a bird comes to help plant reproduction. A bird is a bird, a bird is a bird doing bird things upon a tree or a snowy tundra. Birds are a peculiar set of animals with males being elegant for the female counterpart. With flashy colors and dances, they gladly whirl and twirl to reproduce for the species. Pretty pink hues march together on the flat land when born. A flamingo steps in an odd way, leading the way for the newborns. With their brownish coloring, their tiny feet walk ready to mimic the color of their elders. Greenish with blue vibrantly spread upon the eyes of humankind once they notice a peacock. Another male bird with a job of slaying the heart of a woman with beauty. Humans are different from birds when it comes to gender roles. As peculiar nature is, another existential question appears. A bird is a bird isn't that enough for humans. Well, as fantastic as this world is answers to the inner mechanisms are curious. A bird upon flight doesn't fear for its own life. A bird doesn't understand the human influence on habitats they prosper in. For the flight, a bird has learned about it from parents. Trial by fire, guarding the baby birds, but also handing them a future. Soaring the blue compliments each feather to the ones that are gifted with flight. Those unlucky make life upon the earth catching fish or whatever delicious something that is nearby. A penguin doesn't think of flight but survives within its environment leaking information on the young penguins. The ostrich proceeds to appear hilarious while they search for food. Land or air a bird can still be a bird laying fruitful eggs or placing them on dirt. An egg is a form of life growing ready to be pinkish, brownish, or blackish. Birds are beauty within a world of toxic gases and poisons. Negatives could be they shat on your car before work or attack you when agitated. Birds choose to be themselves without guessing otherwise. They fly above us singing bird songs of joyous freedom. That might be the reason for people wanting to take flight. Flying appears to be freedom without bounds holding someone down. A bird is a bird, birds do bird things and maybe humans could appreciate them often.
  • Jessica Jane
    Published 2 months ago
    Things You Should Know Before Owning a Parrot

    Things You Should Know Before Owning a Parrot

    You walk into a pet store, and you're suddenly bombarded with a variety of musky smells and noises from animals. Dogs barking, cats meowing. As you walk around, you hear chirping; a variety of parrots. A thought crosses your mind and you decide you want a budgie (parakeet). So you buy a cage, a couple of toys, a bag of seeds, and a bird.
  • Jessie White
    Published 2 months ago
    Backyard Chickens (Pt. 4)

    Backyard Chickens (Pt. 4)

    The chicks have been with us for almost four weeks now. They've transformed and are quadrupedal their once fluffy little ball selves. So, I'm going to do an update. Today we'll cover their growing needs and challenges that have been faced and overcome.
  • Jessie White
    Published 3 months ago
    Backyard Chickens (Pt. 3)

    Backyard Chickens (Pt. 3)

    The chicks arrival and the time since they got here has been a bit hectic. My daughter went from excited protector to a distracted child. It happens. Then she shifted again to mother hen and now back to distracted caretaker. Seems like progress to me.
  • Jessie White
    Published 3 months ago
    Backyard Chickens (Pt. 2)

    Backyard Chickens (Pt. 2)

    So, we've got chickens coming. (Well, now they're here, but I'm writing this a bit late.) The biggest job when you're waiting on your chicks is to prepare for them. There are a number of things to be aware of before you start trying to piece together everything, so let's go over what I've learned.
  • Jessie White
    Published 3 months ago
    Backyard Chickens

    Backyard Chickens

    It was a late afternoon on a steamy May day. First things first, I don't handle the heat well and early summer was firmly rooted in place. My daughter and I were stuck in traffic. The endless road work stalled us at least an hour every day after school. That's the moment my daughter spoke up. "I want chickens."
  • Rick Beneteau
    Published 4 months ago
    Holy Crow!

    Holy Crow!

    I crawled into bed after an especially exasperating, work-filled Sunday, flipping through the television channels trying to find something at least quasi-intelligent to watch, as is one of my usual wind-down mechanisms.
  • Munjeeta Sohal
    Published about a year ago
    “We Don't Deal with Morals, We Deal with the Law”

    “We Don't Deal with Morals, We Deal with the Law”

    This morning I set my alarm for half past four, and was out of the house before dawn. Not for work, but to go to a slaughterhouse in East London. I was going to bear witness to a truck carrying a cargo of broiler chickens.
  • Linda Blankenship
    Published about a year ago
    So You Want a Parrot?

    So You Want a Parrot?

    Ever thought about getting a parrot? I didn't but here I am and I am going to give you the facts. Meet my feathered friend Poncho. He's beautiful, isn't he? Beware, though, because sometimes what you see is not what you get. There is a lot more to him than just a coat of colored feathers. This inquisitive creature is demanding, bossy, and very vocal. Before you make that decision to purchase a parrot, I would like to introduce you to my facts. Poncho was given to me roughly eight years ago by a friend of mine. I decided to meet this feathered mess on a trial basis; however, he eventually stole my heart. The most important thing to consider before you make that purchase should be, "Will this bird like me?" Poncho is a one person bird. I have been fortunate enough to be that one person. He will not bring himself to like anyone else and that, my friend, is one of the main reasons why most people will get rid of their birds. Do realize, though, you can't "HATE" them for it. It's just in their nature to do what they do so if they don't like you, you can't take it personally yet you can't punish them either. I am an avid animal lover so my animals regardless of any situation are my forever family. I am the one that makes the adjustment. How do you make it work? If you decide to keep it regardless of its desire to be with one person only, it's going to take some compromise between you and everyone in the household. You will have to set boundaries and you're going to have to set rules. My husband knows that if the doors are closed to the living room, Poncho is probably out and most likely on my shoulder so he knows that if he doesn't want to get attacked, he will have to ENTER WITH CAUTION.
  • Holden Green
    Published about a year ago
    Why You Should Take Up Birding

    Why You Should Take Up Birding

    Perhaps you've seen them down at the park, at a nature reserve, or at a lake. People peering up into the trees with binoculars, or finding an ordinary-looking bush very fascinating for some reason. Maybe they're on the shoreline of a reservoir, gawking through what appears to be a small telescope. Before you assume that they're all creepy peeping toms, ask one of them what they're doing. You should do this, first of all, so you can rest assured that they are actually looking at birds. Second, birders are often giddy to share with passersby what they're looking at. Such is the joy of natural discovery.
  • Ada Kaia
    Published about a year ago
    Conservation of Birds—Based on Bridget Strutchbury's 'Silence of the Songbirds'

    Conservation of Birds—Based on Bridget Strutchbury's 'Silence of the Songbirds'

    On a broad, planetary scope, birds face a variety of threats, such as climate change, habitat deforestation, and degradation and other human impacts, such as the impact of pesticides. Since many birds migrate long distances, conservation efforts become more difficult. For instance many Cliff Swallows summer in North America (the neoartic) and winter in South America (the neotropic) realm. Therefore the diversity of ecosystems that need protection for the sake of their survival are great.
  • Graciee online
    Published about a year ago
    5 Tips on Bonding with Your Bird

    5 Tips on Bonding with Your Bird

    What many people don't realize about birds is that they are very intelligent and very social. So when you have a pet bird it's important to include them in your everyday life. As a college student who works, I am pretty busy, But I am also the pet parent to a very mischievous conure (shown above) named Timon aka Birdie. Even though I am busy and have other pets to attend to, Birdie and I still manage to have a great relationship, But I know there are other bird parents who struggle to find time to bond with their bird. So I thought I would suggest some ways I like to bond with My bird throughout my day.