adoption

Our guide to animal adoption; learn why, where, and how to prepare to adopt a cat, kitten, dog or puppy from an animal shelter or rescue group.

  • Austin Conour
    Published about a year ago
    The Dog That Lived

    The Dog That Lived

    As a normal college graduate would do, I was on the hunt for the perfect career... in Florida. My family and I are from Central Illinois and I grew up here so this was a big change. On a whim, I decided I would like to take the chance and move to the amazing state of Florida.
  • Lindsay Parks
    Published about a year ago
    Signs Your Adopted Pet Was Abused (And What to Do About It)

    Signs Your Adopted Pet Was Abused (And What to Do About It)

    Adopting a pet is a milestone in one's life. As exciting and rewarding as it may seem on the surface, it comes with great responsibility. Pet parents want nothing but the best for their animals and that begins with their health. When adopting a pet, there is a chance that the animal may have been previously abused, which means that the animal has suffered from injuries and neglect, thus resulting in extreme behavior. It takes extra care and attention for these abused animals to feel safe and secure.
  • Madison Shaw
    Published about a year ago
    Cat and Dog

    Cat and Dog

    After school on February 1, 2008 when I was eight years old, my family and I went to the animal shelter next to my house to look at the cats and possibly adopt one that day. When we walked in, we entered the room that held all their cats, there were about fifteen or twenty that day and I immediately saw this orange and white tabby that I loved while my brother say a grey and black cat (who had been meowing since we walked in the room) that he liked. A worker came inside the room and got the orange and white cat out of his crate and said, "This is Louie." My parents talked to her for a while about him and when she left the cat finally stopped meowing and my dad said, "The next cat who meows gets to come home with us," and Louie meowed. We took that as some sort of sign that he was meant for us to have him and we got him. When we were at the counter for him, the worker told us that he had a little cold and we would have to give him some medicine for it. This made it worse for him when he came home, he was in a brand new place and on top of him not knowing us we had to hold him (when he wanted to be left alone) and give him the medicine.
  • Corinne Blossfeld
    Published about a year ago
    Humane Society

    Humane Society

    I one hundred percent want you to save an animal's life, and by no means want you to stop going to humane societies to find a new family friend. Their background checks are fairly good and you can be assured they will go to a good home, and you are guaranteed a good pet, considering most don't make it. By all means, please go pick up animals from the humane society.
  • Megan MacNeil
    Published about a year ago
    A Stray Miracle

    A Stray Miracle

    One day old Moo Man.
  • Kendall Cardoza
    Published about a year ago
    Pet to Family—Is Yours Ready?

    Pet to Family—Is Yours Ready?

    Pets are easily the greatest addition to a family, but are you ready for one? A pet is something to grow with you and your family, not something to be cast off when it gets too big or you no longer have the desire for it. Hundreds of animals end up in shelters because the owners don't want it anymore, or it wasn't what they thought, they didn't know it would get that big, and tons of other excuses. So before you adopt or buy a new pet, do your research on it so you can make sure it is actually something you really want and won't take back two weeks later. Go through your home, do you have room for a four-legged addition? The most common is dogs, everybody wants a cute little puppy but nobody wants a dog. They take time to train, lots of food, and require room to run/play! Dogs vary from tiny little Chihuahuas to huge Great Danes. Each one has tailored needs, and it takes a lot of responsibility. Cats have to be the biggest one, kittens are so cute and tiny, but once they grow up a lot of people don't think they are the cutest thing. Once cats go into a shelter as an adult it is highly certain that they will not be adopted. So before you make the big decision to get a new pet, make sure you are ready for it. Here are some basic key tips to remember before inviting the new addition in!
  • Alexa Marvel
    Published about a year ago
    Pet to Family - Are You Ready?

    Pet to Family - Are You Ready?

    I remember the day he came; my sister screamed in surprise for it was a dream come true for her. After years of her deliberation, she got what she wanted—a dog. He was smelly since you know it is impossible to take care of each and every animal in adoption since they are innumerable. Like many others, he too was an adoption failure because of his aggressive nature. Though I loved him, I felt jealous because my parents heard her desire but not mine. Slowly and gradually that hatred was turned into love. Then, we had a relationship purely out of love. As the course of time went by, he became closer to his end until he slept on my mother's lap forever. It was then I realized that all those silent sobs and swollen eyes were not for a pet but for a brother.
  • Emily Elliott
    Published about a year ago
    It Was "Meant to Be!"

    It Was "Meant to Be!"

    For months my wife and I had been eagerly waiting for a puppy that we had put a deposit on earlier that year. That January, we had found a breeder for Alaskan Malamutes near Seattle, Washington. She had told us that we would either be eighth in line for the February/March litter or we would be first for the April/May litter. She warned us that she cannot predict how many puppies her female would have so we may or may not get a puppy with the first litter. March comes around and there were seven puppies. Disappointed of course, we were hopeful and excited to get a puppy in the next few months.
  • Kendra
    Published 2 years ago
    Being a First-Time Cat Owner

    Being a First-Time Cat Owner

    You can't shake a stick on the internet without hitting a cat.
  • Alicia Brunskill
    Published 2 years ago
    Adopting a Cat
  • Brianna Summers
    Published 2 years ago
    The Truth About Working at a Shelter

    The Truth About Working at a Shelter

    When most people think about a shelter they think of the smell of dogs. The smell of feces and urine, loud barking, whining, and bowls clanking. Not my shelter. My shelter is good, clean, still loud at times but we take care of our own. I work at a no kill shelter in St. Charles, MO. When I go and get dogs from other animal control facilities the description I gave above is all I see. I hear good things and bad things about these other shelters, but regardless I go and get those dogs for our shelter. Working at a no kill shelter, like mine, doesn’t make my job any less hard than those other shelters that do kill and are government funded. I still get people that come in and cry to me about how they can’t handle their dogs anymore, how they are moving, how they are having a baby, or just that they don’t want to have a dog anymore. I see it all, every day. All of these dogs eventually find good, loving, stable homes but when they come in they don’t know why they are here. They are scared, and alone abandoned by their families. We try to make them feel safe, giving them a nice bed to lay on, toys, food, and fresh water. We give them a bath, trim their nails, and clean their ears to make them feel better. You see, most of our dogs come from homes but that doesn’t mean they aren’t dirty, ears infected, teeth never been brushed, never been given a bath. So we make them feel clean and warm, like they may have never felt before. We try to give them all the comforts of a real home, without the family part. Until one day that family comes, and they finally feel safe.
  • Desti Diaries
    Published 2 years ago
    The Power to Heal

    The Power to Heal

    2017 was the year that I found out that both of my grandparents were diagnosed with cancer. 2017 was also the same here I adopted Ino, but we will get into that in a second.