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most forgotten dangerous cults that are still active

If you are thinking about joining a religious group, you should be aware of the risks. Before making a decision, do your research and consult with your loved ones

By DavidPublished 9 months ago 17 min read
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A cult is a group or movement that shares a common commitment to an often extreme ideology, which is often embodied in a charismatic leader. Cults are frequently distinguished by a demand for unquestioning devotion, a willingness to reject outsiders, and an infallible leader.

Cults can be dangerous and have a negative impact on their members' lives. Mind control techniques have been used by some cults to manipulate their members, and some have even been involved in criminal activity.

If you are thinking about joining a religious group, you should be aware of the risks. Before making a decision, do your research and consult with your loved ones.

Here are some indicators that a group is a cult:

The group is led by a charismatic figure who is thought to be infallible.

The group expects complete dedication from its members.

The group keeps its members away from the outside world.

The group manages the finances of its members.

Mind control techniques are used by the group.

The organization has a history of violence and criminal activity.

If you suspect that you or someone you know is involved in a cult, there are resources available to assist you. The National Cult Awareness Network (NCAAN) is a non-profit organization that helps people affected by cults by providing information and support. There is a list of resources on the NCAAN website, including hotlines, support groups, and educational materials.

1. The Order of the Solar Temple

The Order of the Solar Temple was a doomsday cult that believed the world was ending and that they were the only ones capable of saving humanity. Luc Jouret and Joseph Di Mambro, two former psychiatrists who became interested in esotericism and mysticism, founded the cult in 1984. The cult drew a wealthy and well-educated following who were drawn to its message of hope and salvation.

In 1994, 53 Order of the Solar Temple members committed mass suicide in Switzerland, France, and Canada. The suicides took place in a series of ritualistic ceremonies during which the members drank cyanide-laced wine. The world was shocked by the mass suicides, which raised concerns about the dangers of cults and the power of charismatic leaders.

The Order of the Solar Temple is no longer active, but its legacy continues to fascinate and frighten people. The cult's mass suicides highlight cults' ability to manipulate and control their members, as well as the dangers of charismatic leaders who promise salvation.

2. Heaven's Gate

Marshall Applewhite and Bonnie Nettles founded the company in 1975.

Beliefs: Heaven's Gate members believed that a spaceship was following the Hale-Bopp comet and that they needed to commit suicide to board the spaceship and ascend to a higher plane of existence.

Heaven's Gate committed mass suicide in 1997, killing 39 people. The members were discovered dead in their Rancho Santa Fe, California mansion. They were all dressed in black and wore Nike sneakers with plastic bags over their heads. According to a note discovered at the scene, the members committed suicide in order to "shed their earthly containers" and "board the spaceship."

Heaven's Gate is a well-known example of a cult-related tragedy. The world was shocked by the mass suicide, which raised concerns about the dangers of cults and the power of charismatic leaders.

3. The People's Temple

Jim Jones founded the company in 1955.

The People's Temple was a socialist cult that promoted communal living and equality. Jones was a charismatic leader who drew a following of people seeking a better life.

Jonestown: In 1978, Jones led over 900 of his followers to Guyana, where the Jonestown commune was established. Jonestown was a closed community where Jones had complete control over his followers' lives.

Jones ordered the mass suicide of his followers on November 18, 1978. Drinking cyanide-laced Kool-Aid killed over 900 people. One of the most well-known examples of a cult-related tragedy is the Jonestown mass suicide.

The People's Temple serves as a reminder of cult dangers and the power of charismatic leaders. Jones was capable of manipulating and controlling his followers, ultimately leading to their deaths. It is critical to recognize cult warning signs and protect yourself from their harmful influence.

4. The Unification Church

Sun Myung Moon founded the organization in 1954.

Beliefs: The Unification Church is a relatively new religious movement that combines Christian and Korean spiritual elements. Sun Myung Moon, according to the church, is the Second Coming of Christ and the only one who can save humanity. Marriage, according to the church, is a sacred union between a man and a woman, and it is the only way to achieve true happiness.

Criticism has been leveled at the Unification Church for its use of brainwashing and financial exploitation. The church has also been accused of being a cult by critics.

The Unification Church

The Unification Church is a divisive organization, but it is also a legitimate religious movement with millions of followers around the world. Before forming an opinion about the Unification Church, it is critical to be aware of the various perspectives on it.

5. The Church of Scientology

The Church of Scientology is a contentious organization that has been accused of a variety of wrongdoings, including brainwashing, extortion, and human rights violations. L. Ron Hubbard founded the church in 1954, claiming to have discovered a new form of therapy called Dianetics. Dianetics is based on the belief that "engrams," or traumatic memories stored in the subconscious mind, cause mental problems.

Scientology has been chastised for employing mind control techniques such as auditing, a type of one-on-one counseling that can be intense and emotionally draining. Critics also claim that Scientology uses personal information about its members against them and has been involved in a number of legal scandals.

Despite the controversy, Scientology has millions of followers around the world. The church is a powerful organization with a well-funded legal team, and it has successfully defended itself against many of the charges leveled against it.

The following are some of the specific allegations leveled against the Church of Scientology:

Brainwashing: Critics claim that Scientology manipulates its members through mind control techniques. Auditing is one of these techniques. It is a type of one-on-one counseling that can be very intense and emotionally draining.

Extortion: Critics claim that Scientology uses personal information about its members to extort money from them. The church, for example, has been accused of threatening to release members' "auditing transcripts" if they do not pay their church debts.

Human rights violations: Critics claim that Scientology has violated the human rights of its members. The church, for example, has been accused of imprisoning members in its "Rehabilitation Project Force" (RPF), a labor camp for members accused of wrongdoing.

The Church of Scientology has denied all of the accusations leveled against it. According to the church, its critics are motivated by prejudice and Scientology is a legitimate religion that helps people improve their lives.

6. NXIVM

Keith Raniere established the cult NXIVM in 1998. The cult marketed itself as a self-help group, but it was actually a pyramid scheme that exploited its members using mind control techniques. In 2019, Raniere was convicted of sex trafficking and racketeering, and NXIVM was disbanded shortly afterward.

Here are some of the things NXIVM did to take advantage of its members:

NXIVM members were recruited using high-pressure sales tactics. People who were already successful in their careers or looking for personal development were frequently targeted by the cult.

Mind control: NXIVM used a variety of mind control techniques to keep its members under control. Gaslighting, emotional manipulation, and isolation were among the techniques used.

NXIVM cheated its members financially, emotionally, and sexually.

The cult demanded that its members pay large sums of money for its programs, and it also forced its members to work for free. Furthermore, Raniere and other high-ranking NXIVM members sexually abused their female members.

NXIVM was a dangerous cult that inflicted significant harm on its members. It is critical to recognize cult warning signs so that you can protect yourself from their harmful influence.

Here are some cult warning signs:

Cults frequently have a charismatic leader who is revered by the members. The leader is frequently regarded as infallible, capable of manipulating the members into doing whatever he or she desires.

Isolation: Cult members are frequently isolated from their friends and family. This makes it difficult for members, even if they want to, to leave the cult.

Cults frequently have control over their members' finances. This could include requiring them to donate money to the cult or pay for costly programs.

Cults frequently exert control over their members' behavior. This could include requiring them to dress in a certain manner, eat in a certain manner, or follow certain rules.

Cults frequently attempt to control their members' thoughts. This could include requiring them to read specific books, watch specific videos, or attend specific lectures.

If you suspect that you or someone you know is involved in a cult, there are resources available to assist you. The National Cult Awareness Network (NCAC) is a non-profit organization that provides cult-related information and resources. The NCAC website includes a list of cult warning signs as well as information on how to leave a cult. You can also contact the NCAC at 1-800-851-5427.

7. Children of God

David Berg founded the controversial religious movement Children of God in 1968. Teens for Christ was the group's original name, but it was changed to Children of God in 1971. Berg, also known as "Father David" or "Mo" to his followers, was a charismatic leader who drew a following of young people seeking a new way of life.

The Children of God movement was known for its outlandish practices, such as communal living, free love, street evangelism, and music. The group was also chastised for using child sexual abuse, which Berg justified as a means of spreading God's love.

Berg died in 1995 and was succeeded by his daughter Karen Zerby, now known as "Maria." The group rebranded itself as The Family International under Zerby's leadership and abandoned its previous practices of communal living and free love. The group also apologized for the abuse that occurred while Berg was in charge.

The Family International is now a much smaller organization than it once was. Most experts no longer consider the group to be a cult because it has around 1,000 members worldwide. The group's history of abuse and controversy, however, continues to cast a shadow over it.

Children of God

Here are some of the issues that have arisen in relation to Children of God:

Sexual abuse: Children of God were accused of widespread child sexual abuse, including incest and child prostitution.

Brainwashing: Children of God have been accused of using brainwashing techniques to control their members.

Financial exploitation: Children of God was accused of exploiting its members financially.

The Children of God movement was a divisive and frequently troubling organization. It is important to remember, however, that not all members of the group were complicit in the abuse or exploitation that occurred. Many of the group's members were simply looking for a new way of life and were drawn to the group's message of love and peace.

8. Aum Shinrikyo

Shoko Asahara founded the Japanese doomsday cult Aum Shinrikyo in 1984. Asahara claimed to be a messianic figure capable of bringing about global peace. Members of the group were drawn to Asahara's teachings, which blended elements of Buddhism, Hinduism, and Christianity.

When Aum Shinrikyo began stockpiling weapons and conducting experiments with biological and chemical agents in the early 1990s, it drew attention. In 1995, members of the group released sarin gas into the Tokyo subway system, killing 12 people and injuring over 5,000 others. As a result of the attack, Aum Shinrikyo was targeted, and Asahara and many of his followers were arrested.

Asahara and several of his top lieutenants were convicted and sentenced to death for murder. The remaining members of Aum Shinrikyo have been disbanded, but the organization remains a source of concern for Japanese authorities.

Aum Shinrikyo has been linked to a number of other crimes, including the murder of a former member, the attempted murder of a lawyer, and the release of sarin gas in Matsumoto, Japan, in 1994, in addition to the Tokyo subway attack.

Concerns have been raised about the dangers of religious extremism and the need for greater vigilance in monitoring new religious movements as a result of the group's activities.

9. Raëlism

Raëlism is a new religious movement founded in 1974 by Claude Vorilhon, a former race car driver known as Raël. Raëlians believe that humans were created by an extraterrestrial race known as the Elohim, who have come to Earth to teach humans about peace, love, and the importance of environmental protection.

Some critics have accused Ralism of racism and sexism. Raël, for example, has stated that the Elohim are superior to humans and that women are inferior to men. Raëlians, on the other hand, argue that these statements were taken out of context and that Raëlism is a very inclusive religion that welcomes people of all races, religions, and genders.

Here are some of the specific allegations leveled against Raëlism:

Racism: Raël believes that the Elohim are superior to humans and that they have come to Earth to teach humans about peace, love, and the importance of environmental protection.

Sexism: Raël has stated that he believes women are inferior to men.

Child sexual abuse: Within the Raëlian movement, Raël has been accused of covering up child sexual abuse.

Raëlians have denied all of the allegations leveled against them. The Raëlian movement has an ethical code that forbids racism, sexism, and child sexual abuse. In addition, the movement has a number of policies in place to protect children, such as requiring all adults who work with children to undergo background checks.

It is important to note that Raëlism is a contentious movement, with no agreement on whether or not the allegations leveled against it are true. If you are thinking about joining the Raëlian movement, do your research and make an informed decision.

10. The Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster

The Flying Spaghetti Monster Church (FSM) is not a dangerous cult. Bobby Henderson, an Oregon State University physics graduate, founded the satirical religion in 2005. Henderson founded the FSM in order to protest the teaching of intelligent design in schools. Intelligent design is a creationist belief in the creation of the universe by an intelligent being, but it does not specify who or what created the universe.

The Flying Spaghetti Monster, also known as His Noodly Appendage, is said to have created the universe. Pastafarians, or FSM followers, believe that the FSM created the universe by twirling his noodly appendages.

These are just a few of the many dangerous cults that still exist today in the world. It is critical to be aware of these cults in order to protect yourself and your loved ones from their negative influence. They also believe that pirates are the FSM's true prophets.

The FSM is not a dangerous cult, but it is a vibrant and expanding movement. FSM congregations can now be found all over the world, and the IRS has even recognized the movement as a tax-exempt religion.

The FSM is a humorous and lighthearted religion with a serious message. Pastafarians believe that intelligent design education in schools is a form of religious indoctrination. They also regard the FSM as a strong symbol of free thought and scientific skepticism.

If you are interested in religious satire or the history of creationism, the FSM is a unique and interesting religion worth learning more about.

CONCLUSION

In conclusion, cults come in a wide variety of forms and can be challenging to categorize. However, there are some traits that many cults have in common. These qualities consist of:

A charismatic leader: Cults frequently have a charismatic leader who has a lot of power over the followers.

Financial exploitation: Cults frequently take advantage of their members' money by requiring them to give sizable donations to the organization.

A closed system: Cults frequently have a closed communication system, which means that members are only allowed to interact with other members and the outside world under the supervision of the leader.

Thought control: Cults frequently use thought control techniques to manipulate members' beliefs and behaviors.

Physical abuse: Cults have been known to physically abuse their members in some cases.

If you are thinking about joining a religious group, be aware of these red flags. It is best to avoid the group if you notice any of these characteristics.

Here are some ways to avoid cults:

Do your research: Before joining any religious group, do your homework and learn as much as you can about the group's beliefs and practices.

Trust your gut: If something doesn't feel right, it most likely isn't. If you have any reservations about a group, it is best to leave.

Talk to your loved ones: If you are thinking about joining a religious group, talk to your loved ones about it. They may be able to provide you with useful information and advice.

Cults can be dangerous, and it is critical to be aware of the dangers before joining one. You can help protect yourself from the dangers of cults by following these tips.

FAQ

1. How many known cults are there in the world?

There is no definitive answer to this question because the world's cult population is constantly changing. It is estimated that there are between 3,000 and 5,000 cults in the world.

2. What are the three types of cults?

Cults are classified into three types:

Cults of totalitarianism: These cults are distinguished by a high degree of control over their members' lives. Members are frequently isolated from their families and friends, and they may be required to make significant financial contributions to the group.

New religious movements (NRMs): These cults are less well-established and newer than totalitarian cults. They are frequently led by a charismatic figure who entices followers with promises of spiritual enlightenment or personal transformation.

Psychotherapeutic cults: These cults use psychological techniques to keep their members under control. They frequently claim to be able to cure mental illness or other issues, but they may actually cause more harm than good.

3. What do cults believe in?

Cults believe in a variety of things, but they frequently share some common beliefs, such as the following:

The group's leader is infallible.

The beliefs of the group are the only truth.

The members of the group are unique and chosen.

The enemies of the group are evil and must be avoided.

4. What do cultists do?

Cultists engage in a wide range of activities, but they frequently share some practices, such as:

Participating in group meetings

Group literature reading

Donating money to the organization

evangelizing others

Isolating themselves from their loved ones

5. How do people join cults?

People join cults for a variety of reasons, but some of the most common are:

Pursuit of meaning or purpose

A desire to be accepted

A desire for spiritual illumination

A sense of loneliness or isolation

A sense of being lost or unsatisfied

It is critical to understand that not all cults are dangerous. However, before joining a cult, it is critical to be aware of the potential dangers. If you are thinking about joining a cult, you should do your research and consult with your loved ones.

Read More https://www.radafacts.com/2023/06/10-most-forgotten-dangerous-cults-that-are-still-active.html

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