literature

Geek literature from the New York Times or the recesses of online. Our favorite stories showcase geeks.

  • Cyn's Workshop
    Published 21 minutes ago
    Review of 'The Knucklehead of Silicon Valley'

    Review of 'The Knucklehead of Silicon Valley'

    Synopsis
  • Mae McCreery
    Published 36 minutes ago
    Reading is NOT Boring

    Reading is NOT Boring

    Ever since I was a kid, I’ve loved books. I’m an only child and the only cousin that was close enough to my age was 9 years older than me. When I started school, I didn’t live near enough to any of my friends for play dates. So outside of school, I had books to keep me company.
  • Liv Atterson
    Published about 3 hours ago
    Recent Reads 1-5

    Recent Reads 1-5

    Recent Reads: 1-5
  • Cyn's Workshop
    Published about 8 hours ago
    Review of 'A Dance with Fate'
  • Annie Kapur
    Published about 8 hours ago
    "Castle Rackrent" by Maria Edgeworth

    "Castle Rackrent" by Maria Edgeworth

    Within this text, a number of striking personalities can be seen. First and foremost we have the personality of the first generation guided by Sir Patrick, a man of little means and of normally few words apart from a more godly and patriarchal view in a William Faulkner fashion. Sir Patrick is declared a ‘spend-thrift’ and is often the most concerned about the view of others upon himself as a moral human being towards them. A Machiavellian trait, this is thought to have continued in the lineage of the family. Sir Murtagh is the second generation and he is described as a ‘fiend’ and often a ‘litigating fiend’. Here we see the morality of the family descend ever so slightly and so, the reader is given insight into the decline and fall of this rather extensively proud and historical family of old, Irish faith. Within the third generation the reader meets Sir Kit - a deplorable human being, a gambler, a spender and an abusive husband to his wife. Here the reader can clearly see a massive decline from what was the historical past of Sir Patrick in which the spend-thrift culture was clearly visible to all. Sir Kit seems to be overtly concerned about himself and does not care what others think of him. This is most likely a delusion of grandeur since he has come from a family that is both respected and historical and, as he is the third generation, must feel as if he is entitled to respect and is automatically virtuous for his purity of family. Finally we have the furthest generation away from the firast which is the fourth generation of Sir Condy. Sir Condy is a man that is often considered the morally better of the four, the more likeable of them all and yet, the most susceptible to suggestion out of them all. He is constantly manipulated and duped, turned and twisted. His naivety is his downfall and therefore, he too has similar faults to his predecessors - that he cannot see something approaching right in front of him and that he has very little self-control. But in the way that the older generations have no self-control because of various needs such as: saving money, fiendishness and machiavellianism, gambling addiction and spending money relentlessly - Sir Condy has no self-control because of the way in which other characters tend to want to control or overpower him.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published about 8 hours ago
    "Oedipus Rex" by Sophocles

    "Oedipus Rex" by Sophocles

    The first time I read this book I was in sixth form, so I was about maybe sixteen or seventeen. The way in which I discovered this book was actually only because my teacher was talking about it for a brief time in a class about Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” and the Freudian Complexes of the play. I’m not going to lie, at first I was actually only interested in the Sophocles play because of the fact I hadn’t read it - but when I started reading it I was then thoroughly disgusted. I stayed up for most of the night reading and annotating my tattered second hand copy and then, when all was done, I put it down and didn’t really pick it up again purely because it was a bit too gross. The next time I’d pick it up, my opinion of Ancient Greek Plays was already fully formed and I understood that they were all absolutely disgusting.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published a day ago
    “The Brothers Karamazov” by Fyodor Dostoevsky

    “The Brothers Karamazov” by Fyodor Dostoevsky

    In this part of the book, we cover the themes and symbols regarding the following emotional states:
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 2 days ago
    10 Books: Adventure Novels

    10 Books: Adventure Novels

    Adventure novels are good for any occasion, normally written as children’s texts, they are perfect for going on a ride when you don’t want to leave your home. Since I was a child, I’ve always loved various adventure books no matter where they are from or what they are about - they can be as magical as ever, or they can be realist as hell. Adventure novels were most famous during the late 19th and early 20th century when children had little less to do than play with wooden toys and outside in their gardens. In order to present children with great reading material and stories that they could act out with their friends, read at bedtime and enjoy throughout the cold winters when they couldn’t go outdoors - authors penned children’s novels. Throughout the 20th century, the children’s literature grew and grew until it got a resurgence with the release of “Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone” in 1996. Then, children’s literature got the kick it needed and became one of the biggest selling genres of the next twenty years. What I want to have a look at today is which novels you should be reading in order to learn more about children’s literature and where it came from. So let us go through ten big books of children’s literature. The more we know about what we read as children, the more we can know about why we read as adults.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 3 days ago
    "Therese Raquin" by Emile Zola

    "Therese Raquin" by Emile Zola

    It’s been about eight years since I’ve read this - I first read it when I was around sixteen and since then, I’ve read the book, read a graphic novel based on the book, listened to the audiobook, watched a production of it and read a ton of journals all about the way in which the book portrays Shakespearean themes. The way in which I first discovered it was because I heard about it on the radio. Yes, the radio. I don’t actually remember exactly where but I liked the pronunciation of the word and looked for it for half an hour because I couldn’t spell it. It took a while but I finally found it and read the book. It was crazy and amazing. It was almost overwhelmingly emotional and it makes you fearful and tearful at the same time. It completely changed the way I thought about gothic romances and what they could achieve. I admit, I never thought literature could be so dark and romantic since I read Anne Rice’s Vampire Chronicles Series.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 3 days ago
    "The Book and the Brotherhood" by Iris Murdoch

    "The Book and the Brotherhood" by Iris Murdoch

    Within this text there is a clear account of each character being tortured by three things: their identity, change and the past. The book represents the way in which the characters evolve through their understandings of themselves and the growth of each of their relationships. From the death of Gerard’s father to Tamar’s strange and aloof attitude - this book constructs character identities from their past experiences and gives the reader reason to believe that now that all is said and done, their lives are falling apart at the seams. Each and every one of them has an individual identity and yet, their identity is entirely different to what the reader believes of them after reading the book.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 3 days ago
    10 Books: Existential Men

    10 Books: Existential Men

    Men have constantly been the source for great soliloquies of existentialism in literature. Just thinking about some such as the speeches of Hamlet in William Shakespeare’s eponymous play, Victor Frankenstein in Mary Shelley’s magnum opus and in the works of Dostoevsky, Gogol, Victor Hugo, and many more. These books always have men who are mentally disturbed by either their own existence, are disturbed by someone else’s existence, feel either hunted, alienated from reality, treated like outsiders for some reason or have been rejected, resented or hated for reasons that are not entirely fair, but you can definitely see where the other characters are coming from.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 4 days ago
    20 Books of 2020 (Pt.35)

    20 Books of 2020 (Pt.35)

    We have finally hit 700 and I can honestly say thank you to everyone who has been joining me on this journey. Recommendations have been welcome from every corner of the globe whilst I have also been expanding my knowledge of the modern classics. I also want to thank you for joining me in my 'first impression' articles where I spend around 2'000 words on a book I've been analysing and write about what my very first impression of themes and plot were. It has been incredibly interesting this year since I've had a lot more time to read during lockdown and yet, I feel like I'm not exhausted or burnt out at all. I find that I've become more social in my reading - giving and receiving recommendations, people actually caring about what I think about books and I've made a ton of new friends.