comics

From Marvel to DC, Geeks explores the popular and independant comic titles in the geek universe.

  • Daniel Tessier
    Published 6 days ago
    SPANDEX lives!

    SPANDEX lives!

    There's a long history of LGBT comics hiding out in the small presses. For a long time, the big American publishers banned any mention of homosexuality under the Comics Code, and even after the code was ended, Marvel had a blanket ban on such things into the early nineties. British comics had a bit more leeway in theory, but since comics here were still viewed mainly as a kids' medium throughout the twentieth century they were affected heavily by the government's Section 28, which banned any positive depictions of homosexuality in schools but which had knock-on effects in any kid-focused media.
  • Kasey Rae
    Published 8 days ago
    Other Worlds: Comics Outside of the Hero-Verse

    Other Worlds: Comics Outside of the Hero-Verse

    Why is it that when we think comics, we tend to think superhero and villain? Ignoring the Hollywood influence, the answer is physiological. Our species has a long history of sharing stories through the drawn image. Charcoal and limonite on cave walls has transformed into ink on bound glossy paper. Human brains are LATENT with narcissism, making it essential that we see ourselves in the stories we read. Our hopes lie in the hero, our mistakes with the villain, and our endless efforts of self-improvement match that of the classic anti-hero. What about the other aspects of humanity? The full spectrum of love, growing up, illness, and the horror that lies in even the banalest existence.
  • Katie Hammerbeck
    Published 8 days ago
    Werewolf
  • Matthew Donnellon
    Published 15 days ago
    The Most Iconic Duo Of All Time

    The Most Iconic Duo Of All Time

    The world is ruled by iconic duos.
  • Zack Krafsig
    Published 25 days ago
    X-Plaining the Dawn of X: House of X and Powers of X

    X-Plaining the Dawn of X: House of X and Powers of X

    In July of 2019, Marvel Comics, Johnathan Hickman, Pepe Larraz, and R.B. Silva completely upended and revitalized the mutant-centric X-Men line of comic book titles with House of X/Powers of X. The twelve-part event comic brought many changes to the structure of the Marvel Universe, as well as ten new monthly series, two limited series, three one-shots, and more on the way. With the next major event, X of Swords (read as ‘Ten of Swords’) on the way this September, it seems appropriate to recap all the titles and changes that lead here. Starting with the pivotal HOX/POX
  • Katie Hammerbeck
    Published 26 days ago
    Werewolf
  • Katie Hammerbeck
    Published about a month ago
    Dnaleri
  • Katie Hammerbeck
    Published about a month ago
    Dnaleri
  • Katie Hammerbeck
    Published about a month ago
    Dnaleri
  • Katie Hammerbeck
    Published about a month ago
    Dnaleri
  • Katie Hammerbeck
    Published about a month ago
    Dnaleri
  • Katie Hammerbeck
    Published about a month ago
    Dnaleri