science

Topics and developments in science and medicine, presented by Futurism.

  • What If
    Published a day ago
    What Happens If You Fall Into Liquid Nitrogen?

    What Happens If You Fall Into Liquid Nitrogen?

    Jumping into a pool of liquid nitrogen might sound like an awesome way to cool off when the, uh, mercury is rising, but it’s really a terrible idea that no one should ever attempt.
  • Katie Leslove
    Published 3 days ago
    Important Physical and Chemical Properties of Potassium Chloride and Calcium Nitrate

    Important Physical and Chemical Properties of Potassium Chloride and Calcium Nitrate

    Potassium chloride and calcium nitrate are both ionic compounds. Potassium chloride molecules are made up of one potassium cation and one chloride anion. The chemical formula of potassium chloride can, therefore, be denoted by KCl. Calcium nitrate molecules, on the other hand, are made up of one calcium cation and two nitrate anions.
  • Iria Vasquez-Paez
    Published 14 days ago
    The Piri Reis Map

    The Piri Reis Map

    Ancient maps have startling similarities to the way the coastlines are shaped for now. Antarctica may have been free of ice three million years ago, a fact gleaned from the Cenozoic unicellular algae in 1983. Earth-crust displacement moved Antarctica further south by two thousand miles, something discovered in 1953 by Professor Charles Hapgood, a teacher at Keene College in New Hampshire. Antarctica was free of ice until 4,000 B.C, a thousand years before Egypt and Sumerian civilization started to explore the sea. The PIri Reis map was drawn with accurate Antarctica contours, since Antarctica was discovered three hundred years after the map was drawn.
  • René Junge
    Published 16 days ago
    The Secret of the Supervolcanoes

    The Secret of the Supervolcanoes

    The outbreak of a supervolcano regularly has devastating consequences. A typical eruption, like that of Mount St. Helens in 1980, hurls lava and ash into the atmosphere up to a cubic kilometer.
  • Roscoe Forthright
    Published 20 days ago
    Fringe Science:  Paul Babcock

    Fringe Science: Paul Babcock

    Paul Babcock is recognized for his expertise in alternative energy systems and power generation systems for companies and for individuals, especially in remote locations. He has studied Nikola Tesla, Wilhelm Reich, Walter Russell, George Lakhovsky and many others. Over a lifetime, of study and creative thought, Paul Babcock has discovered specific threads which weave through the ideas, theories and spirit of these great inventors. He discusses these threads in his book, The Universal Medium.
  • Marco Bonomo
    Published 23 days ago
    Puerto Rico has awakened completely in the dark due to a very rare Saharan sandstorm

    Puerto Rico has awakened completely in the dark due to a very rare Saharan sandstorm

    Every summer, the wind transports large quantities of desert dust particles from the hot and dry Sahara desert into northern Africa across the Atlantic Ocean, but this year the sandstorm is a record high.
  • John Anderson
    Published 23 days ago
    Hungarian researchers have discovered a 5th fundamental force: potential source of new energy

    Hungarian researchers have discovered a 5th fundamental force: potential source of new energy

    All known forms of energy derived from the four fundamental forces of the Universe: gravitation discovered by Newton, electromagnetism or Lorentz force, the "weak" force at work in nuclear reactors, and the strong nuclear force responsible for reactions. melting in the heart of the star or H-bomb scientists of Hungarian ATOMKI laboratory Debrecen in Hungary say they have identified a 5th fundamental strength. If this discovery is confirmed (which is still far from the case), it could reveal the existence of a new form of energy.
  • Moira Western
    Published 23 days ago
    10 Things You Should Know About the Search For Life on Other Planets

    10 Things You Should Know About the Search For Life on Other Planets

    Everyone at one time or another has looked up at the stars on a clear night with wonder. People wonder about what is out there in a universe that is so big. They wonder if humanity is alone. They wonder if someone else on some distant planet is looking at the stars and wondering the same thing. Whether extraterrestrial lifeforms are science fact or science fiction is currently unknown. There is a branch of science that aims to find out what is necessary for life to exist on other planets. They also study whether any nearby planets meet those conditions. They ask themselves questions like: what might show that a planet has life on it? What caused Earth to develop life? What counts as life? How should they study the life they may find? The scientists working on this ambitious mission are called astrobiologists. This list is a mix of frequently asked questions and informative statements. It will help people understand the search for life on other worlds.
  • Ariel M. Scisney
    Published 27 days ago
    The Business of Entropy

    The Business of Entropy

    Do you know where your energy comes from? Not just the energy that powers your appliances, but every facet of your life. From the food you eat, to the fuel in your car, to the electricity in your home, energy moves everything in our lives. That should come as no surprise, but what you may not know is that our energy has a time limit. Rather, the location and distribution of energy changes over time. This is known colloquially as the second law of thermodynamics, the law of entropy. The first law states that the total energy in the universe is constant, and therefore energy cannot be created or destroyed, it can only change forms. Thanks to the understanding of these laws, humans have been able to industrialize their lives in ways unimaginable just a few centuries ago. But as a law of nature, entropy affects every aspect of our lives, not just the things we use switches on. So no matter what your profession is—or whether you ever took a basic science class—it pays to understand how it works.
  • Ariel M. Scisney
    Published 27 days ago
    The Journey of An Atom

    The Journey of An Atom

    The history of the universe is a history of constant change. However, while its state and appearance has changed drastically over the course of its 13.82 billion years of expansion, certain key things have remained unchanged. For one, the laws of nature have stayed constant throughout time and space, for every cubic planck-length of the universe.
  • Ariel M. Scisney
    Published 27 days ago
    The Elements of Life

    The Elements of Life

    There is a fundamental question that arises as a consequence of that strange thing humans do where we know we exist. Namely, "what the heck is all this stuff made of?" Or more specifically, "what am I made of?" This most fundamental of inquiries has been pondered for about as long as there have been people around lucky enough to stave off disease, famine, and warfare. It's no simple question to answer, but today we are fortunate enough to live in a time when children can be handed the answers to these questions before they revolve around the Sun ten times. I've met and worked with more school groups than I can recall, and I'm always astonished at their ever growing capacity to learn. Even middle schoolers today understand the basic structure of atoms, something that has vexed the greatest thinkers throughout history.
  • Ariel M. Scisney
    Published 27 days ago
    Astronomy vs. Astrophysics

    Astronomy vs. Astrophysics

    When I tell people that I study astrophysics, about half of them are awestruck, and the other half of them are completely clueless as to what astrophysics even is. This confusion hasn't escaped the bureaucrats who run the universities that give out degrees for these fields of study. I can't speak for all colleges, but at the University of Colorado Boulder, there is nearly no distinction between astronomy and its cousin field of astrophysics. The differences between the two are subtle, but they were enough for many of my peers to be disgruntled by the fact that the diploma awarded to students who completed an astronomy track and an astrophysics track both have the same label, "astronomy".