future

Exploring the future of science today, while looking back on the achievements from yesterday. Science fiction is science future.

  • SKYLERIZED
    Published 2 years ago
    Life and Production: S1 E7: Forte

    Life and Production: S1 E7: Forte

    Dizzying
  • Cameron Doherty
    Published 2 years ago
    A Step Too Far

    A Step Too Far

    In my hands I held a glass tablet. It displayed the face of the man we were about to arrest. Blue writing surrounded him, notes on the allegations against him, details about him, the recently acquired warrant tucked neatly down in the corner.
  • Jack Emerald
    Published 2 years ago
    Floating Colonies in the Deep Blue Sea

    Floating Colonies in the Deep Blue Sea

    Has the government got you down? Are you tired of being a part of society? Are you longing for a modern-day utopia? Do you wish you could just float away to sea like Tom Hanks in Castaway (Just kidding!)?
  • SKYLERIZED
    Published 2 years ago
    Life and Production: S1 E1: Pilot
  • Edward German
    Published 2 years ago
    The Lifeboat Foundation

    The Lifeboat Foundation

    We do live a world that is uncertain of the Future. The planet is full of places subject to war, famine, pollution, natural disasters, and civil disorder. All of these problems, combined with the technology that humanity now has, can be catastrophic. Enter the Lifeboat Foundation, a non-profit and non-government organization that was founded by internet entrepreneur Eric Klien. The organization was started in 2002 with purpose of safeguarding humanity against existential risks . The Lifeboat Foundation is composed of Advisory Boards consisting of dozens of scientists, engineers, authors, and experts in various other fields. The foundation also funds various programs that are designed to protect the world population. The organization has also considered space colonies as a last resort if other defensive measures fail. The foundation also works on a friendly AI program and has instituted the very first Bitcon endowment fund.
  • Matthew Donnellon
    Published 2 years ago
    Sanctification

    Sanctification

    The line moved slowly. We were herded like cattle in one long, single file line. The decor was surprisingly nice for a place like this. Soft lighting ran through the whole building and on walls of warm, comforting colors. There were even real plants scattered throughout the building. I was amazed by the irony, fresh, healthy, living plants in this building. I have to admit, though, I’d never been in here before. I’d seen the building before, everyone has seen the building, but I never imagined what it was like in here. In truth, I never wanted to think about it.
  • Jacob Holcomb
    Published 2 years ago
    Time Travel: A Primer for the 4th Dimension, Part Two

    Time Travel: A Primer for the 4th Dimension, Part Two

    Science fiction authors have been speculating about this for hundreds of years. Only recently has it become popular to compare and contrast different ideas to try and formulate a set of ideas that could plausibly work together with internal consistency and at the same time allow for interesting time travel stories of the sort we are familiar with.
  • Maddie Marcarelli
    Published 2 years ago
    The Failed Experiment

    The Failed Experiment

    Hayden had many thoughts cross her mind when the alarm clock woke her up. Would she be alive by the next morning? Who would she be sleeping next to if she were to wake up tomorrow? This was the last day she would have to be free. Free of a job, free of a husband, and free of life. But if the worst were to happen today, she would surely be free of any life and, of course, dead.
  • Tom Bacon
    Published 2 years ago
    'Star Wars' Was Apparently Given a Hard Pass to Shoot on the Queen's Property

    'Star Wars' Was Apparently Given a Hard Pass to Shoot on the Queen's Property

    One of the most beautiful filming locations in the United Kingdom, Wiltshire Great Park is a gorgeous 4,800-acre site that's been featured in many famous movies. It's served as a location for films like Bridget Jones's Diary and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Parts 1 and 2. But there's one film that the Crown Estate turned down and it may surprise you: Star Wars.
  • Dustin Miller PolyInnovator
    Published 2 years ago
    The Purpose of the U.L.C.

    The Purpose of the U.L.C.

    Overall most of our lives are based on the 9-5 work cycle, and we get up go to work, eat, sleep, and bathe, then do it all over again. The funny situation is that isn't normal. In most of our history, we got up at the crack of dawn, or perhaps whenever we wanted to, then we got whatever work needed to be done that done, done. There was no time constraints, or limiting factors to our daily lifestyle. On top of that there was much less stress on each individual person.
  • Eve Tawfick
    Published 2 years ago
    Life in 2050

    Life in 2050

    2017 has given the planet its fair share of miseries and it's hard not to imagine oneself in the distant future, far away from the incessant click of phones and barrage of selfies (including my own, check my selfie it's my best yet). Technology and AI are making great leaps and bounds. The first female robot has been given citizenship of Saudi Arabia and you now have the option of consulting your doctor from your phone. For some reason the Conservative party still wants to remain in 1500 but that's ok, like climate change deniers it's likely they will catch up to the rest of the population in a century or so.
  • Simon Mcbride
    Published 2 years ago
    Relativistic Kill Vehicle

    Relativistic Kill Vehicle

    Warfare is constantly progressing, constantly changing. During World War II we pitted troops against each other on great fields of war in ways in which we haven’t seen since. Modern battles are fought with drones, smaller skirmishes and strike teams, surgical and careful. The concept of a Relativistic Kill Vehicle (or RKV), in some ways, it’s just the natural progression of warfare. Leaving the stone age, we developed weapons that took advantage of our newfound ability to manipulate metals. Later, we had a revolution as our understanding of chemistry grew and we realised we could use chemical reactions to propel projectiles. It’s foolish to think that the space age won’t do the same, despite our best efforts to keep space weapons free: The Outer Space Treaty bars placing weapons of mass destruction in orbit of Earth, installing them on the moon, or on or around any other celestial body, or stationing them in outer space in any capacity.