Families logo

How to you exercise when you have kids

That was tough to balance child care and regular exercise but there are ways to make real fitness gains alongside your kids

By shourin orpitaPublished 3 months ago 3 min read
2

People often think they need a specific activity for their kids, such as a dance party or watching a Disney yoga video, but really any body-weight exercise is kid-friendly, she said. Her kids love jumping exercises like squat jumps and lateral jumps, as well as jump rope and ladder drills, and they love doing jumping jacks. "Kids love doing burpees,” said Ms. Bryant. “They love anything where you give them some responsibility and authority.”

Do the exercises together or make them a partner workout, said Ms. Bryant, who teaches family-friendly classes at Peloton. For example, you can hold a plank while they do five jumping jacks, and then you switch and alternate for five minutes. If they lose interest, re-engage them as trainers by asking them to count their reps or running a timer on their phone, or by giving them a block every time they finish a set.

Make exercise fun. “In my adult classes, I use ‘listening games,’” said Ms. Sims, who used to teach elementary school. “When you hear a certain word in a song, you increase your speed. When you hear a certain phrase, you do a certain move.” For example, when Beyoncé says “break my soul” in a song, participants do a “push-up” when they hear the phrase. For kids, do a jumping jack to a song that your child likes. Or, march in place through the verses of a song and do mountain climbers while the song is playing. Marc Santa Maria, vice president of Crunch Fitness, loves to play exercise charades with his wife and nine-year-olds. They write a few strength or yoga moves or poses on a piece of scrap paper and then take turns picking from the bowl. After 30 seconds, everyone starts doing the move. "You yell out the exercise," he said.

Make exercise a game. “In my adult classes, I use ‘listening games,’” said Ms. Sims, who used to be an elementary school teacher, “where people increase their speed as they hear specific words in the song.” With kids, jump jacks are a great way to get them moving. Choose a song that your child likes and pick a move you will do when they hear a certain phrase. “For example, every time you heard Beyoncé say 'break my soul,' you did a push up,” she said. Or, march in place through the verses of a song and do mountain climbers as the chorus went on. Race your child around a race circuit. “If the weather isn’t too cold, you can set up a bike course in the park or in an open area,” said Miss Bryant, “and have your child ride the bike around while you do some crunches and then run the route when they get back.” Try to beat your child’s best time by doing a few laps around the circuit.

Take advantage of the playground! "A playground is a great way to get in full-body exercise,” he said. “Start off by doing some lateral shuffles in each direction around the perimeter. Then, use the equipment on the playground to create multiple stations for cardio exercises, core exercises, upper-body exercises, and lower-body exercises. For instance, if you’re working on your upper-body strength, you could jump off a swing and land on a wide stance and do 10 squats. Or, if you want to work on your lower-body strength, lie across the playground and hold a ‘Superman extension’ with your cactus arms. This will work your back, abs, glutes, and shoulders.At last that is said that we can do much better from these type of exercise that can be benificial for our children and us also .

parentschildren
2

About the Creator

shourin orpita

Hay lets know the world together

Reader insights

Be the first to share your insights about this piece.

How does it work?

Add your insights

Comments

There are no comments for this story

Be the first to respond and start the conversation.

Sign in to comment

    Find us on social media

    Miscellaneous links

    • Explore
    • Contact
    • Privacy Policy
    • Terms of Use
    • Support

    © 2024 Creatd, Inc. All Rights Reserved.