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Vivekananda's Ancient History

Indian young Monk

By MaharajanPublished about a year ago 6 min read
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Vivekananda's Ancient History
Photo by Adityan Ramkumar on Unsplash

Vivekananda was born as Narendranath Datta on 12 January 1863 in Calcutta (now Kolkata), India. He was the eldest of eight siblings in a traditional Bengali family. His father, Vishwanath Datta, was a successful attorney, and his mother, Bhubaneswari Devi, was a devout housewife. As a child, Narendranath was interested in a wide range of subjects, including science, philosophy, and literature. He was also skilled in meditation and had a deep interest in spirituality. He later became a disciple of the mystic Ramakrishna, and in 1887, he took the monastic name Vivekananda, which means "one who has attained enlightenment through knowledge."

Vivekananda young Life:

Vivekananda's early life was spent in Calcutta, where he received his education. He was a bright student and excelled in academics, as well as in sports and music. From a young age, he had a deep interest in spirituality and religion, and would often spend time in meditation and contemplation.

As a teenager, Vivekananda was deeply influenced by the teachings of Sri Ramakrishna, a mystic and spiritual leader whom he met in 1881. Under Ramakrishna's guidance, Vivekananda developed a strong devotion to God and a deep understanding of the Hindu scriptures. He also learned the practices of yoga and meditation, which would later become an important part of his teachings.

After Ramakrishna's death in 1886, Vivekananda decided to become a monk and take the monastic name Vivekananda. He traveled throughout India, visiting holy places and meeting with other spiritual leaders. During this time, he developed his ideas on the unity of religions and the importance of service to others, which would become central to his later teachings.

In short, Young life of Vivekananda was spent in Calcutta, He was a bright student who excelled in academics, sports and music. He had a deep interest in spirituality and religion from a young age and was deeply influenced by the teachings of Sri Ramakrishna. After Ramakrishna's death, He decided to become a monk and traveled throughout India, developing his ideas on the unity of religions and the importance of service to others.

Ramakrishna with Vivekanada

Vivekananda and Ramakrishna Paramahamsa are closely related in history, as Ramakrishna was a major influence on Vivekananda's spiritual development. Ramakrishna was a 19th-century Indian mystic and spiritual leader, who is considered to be one of the most important figures in the Bengali renaissance. He is known for his teachings on the unity of religions, and for his emphasis on direct personal experience of God.

Vivekananda, on the other hand, was one of Ramakrishna's most prominent disciples and a key figure in introducing Ramakrishna's teachings to the world. He was a gifted speaker and writer, and is credited with popularizing Ramakrishna's ideas in the West. He also played a major role in the revival of Hinduism in India and the rise of Indian nationalism movements during the late 19th century.

In summary, Ramakrishna Paramahamsa was a spiritual leader, mystic and mentor who influenced Vivekananda spiritual development. Vivekananda was one of Ramakrishna's most prominent disciples and a key figure in introducing Ramakrishna's teachings to the world. He was instrumental in popularizing Ramakrishna's ideas and played a major role in the revival of Hinduism in India and the rise of Indian nationalist movements.

Vivekanada's Monk Life

After meeting Ramakrishna and becoming one of his disciples, Vivekananda decided to become a monk. He took the monastic name Vivekananda and began traveling throughout India, visiting holy places and meeting with other spiritual leaders.

During this time, Vivekananda practiced intense meditation, yoga, and self-discipline. He studied the Hindu scriptures and other spiritual texts, and deepened his understanding of religion and spirituality. He also began to develop his ideas on the unity of religions and the importance of service to others, which would become central to his later teachings.

Vivekananda spent much of his time in solitude, meditating and contemplating on the nature of God and the meaning of life. He also spent time with the poor and the needy, and began to develop a strong sense of social consciousness and commitment to helping others.

In addition, he also started to give lectures and speeches on spirituality, religion and philosophy, his speeches and teachings were well received by many and he began to gain a reputation as a powerful and inspiring speaker.

In short, Vivekananda's monk life was spent traveling throughout India, visiting holy places and meeting other spiritual leaders. He practiced intense meditation, yoga, and self-discipline, studied Hindu scriptures and spiritual texts, and deepened his understanding of religion and spirituality. He also spend time with the poor and needy, and began to develop a strong sense of social consciousness and commitment to helping others. He also began giving lectures and speeches on spirituality, religion and philosophy, which were well received by many.

Vivekanada's Chicago Speech

Vivekananda's speech at the World's Parliament of Religions in Chicago in September 1893 is considered to be one of his most famous and influential speeches. The Parliament was a historic event, bringing together representatives from different religions from around the world to discuss and exchange ideas.

In his speech, Vivekananda presented the idea of the unity of religions, and emphasized the importance of tolerance and respect for all religions. He also spoke about the spiritual heritage of India, and the need for a synthesis of the best elements of different religions to create a universal faith. He highlighted the importance of self-reliance and the power of individual effort in the spiritual and material progress of humanity.

He began his speech with the words, "Sisters and Brothers of America," which was received with a standing ovation from the audience. He then went on to present the idea of the unity of religions and the importance of tolerance and respect for all religions. He also spoke about the spiritual heritage of India, and the need for a synthesis of the best elements of different religions to create a universal faith. He highlighted the importance of self-reliance and the power of individual effort in the spiritual and material progress of humanity.

His speech was well received by the audience and he was praised for his eloquence and wisdom. It is considered to be a landmark event in the history of interfaith dialogue and the introduction of Indian philosophy and spirituality to the Western world.

In short, Vivekananda's speech at the World's Parliament of Religions in Chicago in September 1893 is considered to be one of his most famous and influential speeches. He presented the idea of unity of religions, emphasized on tolerance and respect for all religions, spoke about the spiritual heritage of India and the need for synthesis of best elements of different religions to create a universal faith, and highlighted the importance of self-reliance and the power of individual effort. His speech was well received by the audience and it is considered as a landmark event in the history of interfaith dialogue and the introduction of Indian philosophy and spirituality to the Western world.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Swami Vivekananda was a prominent Indian monk, philosopher, and spiritual leader of the 19th century. He was a disciple of Ramakrishna Paramahamsa and played a significant role in popularizing Ramakrishna's teachings and ideas. He was a gifted speaker and writer, and his speeches and writings had a profound impact on the spiritual and social development of India.

Vivekananda's most notable contributions include his emphasis on the unity of religions, the importance of self-reliance and individual effort, and his emphasis on service to others as a means of spiritual development. He also played a major role in the revival of Hinduism and the rise of Indian nationalist movements during the late 19th century.

Vivekananda's speech at the World's Parliament of Religions in Chicago in 1893 was a landmark event and it was considered to be one of his most famous and influential speeches. He presented the idea of unity of religions, emphasized on tolerance and respect for all religions, spoke about the spiritual heritage of India and the need for synthesis of best elements of different religions to create a universal faith, and highlighted the importance of self-reliance and the power of individual effort.

Vivekananda's legacy continues to inspire many people around the world to this day. His ideas on spirituality, religion, and social service continue to be relevant and influential, and his emphasis on the unity of religions and the importance of self-reliance and individual effort continue to resonate with people of all backgrounds.

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