teacher

All about teachers and the world of teaching; teachers sharing their best and worst interactions with students, best teaching practices, the path to becoming a teacher, and more.

  • Marci Brodock
    Published 6 months ago
    High-Vibe Teaching

    High-Vibe Teaching

    Most educators today are familiar with or have actively engaged in the teachings of Carol Dweck's Mindset. There are so many facets to her research, but the power of the word "yet" is one of the main components of transforming a "fixed mindset" to a "growth mindset." For example, if you say "I can't do this," you have a fixed mindset and will probably give up and never learn to do it. You will believe you are not capable of the skill or concept, and that will become your truth. However, if you say "I can't do this yet, but I will try," you will give yourself the momentum to get through any obstacles to learn the concept or develop the skill you wish to acquire. This is true in your own learning and the learning of your students. If you have not read about Dweck's Mindset research, I highly recommend it for your own growth and the growth of your students. In addition to using the power of the word "yet," I want to introduce you to six more phrases that can foster a growth mindset, and bring positive energy to your classroom.
  • Alexana Carter
    Published 6 months ago
    What Teaching Taught Me About Communicating

    What Teaching Taught Me About Communicating

    I spent the 2018-19 school year as a Special Education Instructional Aide. While not having all the duties of a teacher, I learned a lot about the kind of teacher I want to be. I learned what works for me and what doesn't when it comes to classroom management and building relationships. I've learned more about what my values are when it comes to building my classroom environment.
  • Katie Hall
    Published 6 months ago
    3 Reasons Teachers Are Leaving the Profession
  • Marci Brodock
    Published 7 months ago
    The Power of Student Reflection

    The Power of Student Reflection

    I am an education junkie. I am constantly reading education blogs and listening to education podcasts. The moment I am faced with an obstacle regarding students or contents, I jump over to Google or Pinterest to find different strategies that might resolve my problem. One of my favorite strategies for student motivation that I have found comes from collecting data from the most important participants in education—my students. I truly believe in the power of student surveys and reflection; therefore, after every test I give, I list a student survey on the board for my students to give me feedback on what went well and what can be improved.
  • Mikkie Mills
    Published 7 months ago
    Top 5 Reasons Why Teaching English Is So Important
  • Isla Wright
    Published 7 months ago
    Top Teacher Tips for Organizing a Large Class

    Top Teacher Tips for Organizing a Large Class

    These numbers vary and depend on the age of the students, but an estimated optimum number would be somewhere between 15 and 25 students. However, having a classroom with 30 students or more is nothing out of the ordinary these days. But how do you handle a class that big? And how do you find time and the right approach to instill knowledge in each and every one of those students? Here are some tips for organizing such classes.
  • Alina Gallupe
    Published 7 months ago
    End of the Year Activities for Kids

    End of the Year Activities for Kids

    Termination can be a difficult time for both clients and counselors or teachers. Students can react to endings in a variety of ways that can often be unpredictable and really different from their usual behavior patterns. Some students might withdraw and mentally seem to create some distance, while others will become aggressive or might act out for increased attention. By incorporating activities to help wrap up the end of the year, you can help curb some of these reactions and ensure that students get closure around the work they have done with you. These can be especially helpful for teachers or counselors who will no longer be working with these children again the coming school year.
  • Louisa Jane
    Published 7 months ago
    Educated Out of Creativity

    Educated Out of Creativity

    I went to university with the concrete plan that I was going to train to be a primary school teacher, something I'd wanted to do since I was fourteen. The course was four years long and would give me the QTS qualification (qualified for teacher status). I had the time of my life, I learned so much, and met people that I will call my friends for decades to come, but I hated the course. 90 percent of it was dull mind-numbing information, that whilst we had to know, it was soul-destroying having lecturers trying to make formative assessment sound interesting. The other 10 percent was incredibly interesting, understanding how children learn language and develop cognitively, the different theories of learning, even writing the essays we were assigned. And this was only when we were in uni. The rest of the time we were on placement in local schools. The university assigned us our schools, a different one each year and gave us new objectives to focus on. Over the course of the four years, we would take over more and more of the class timetable as our skills and confidence grew. Our class teacher(s) would help us with our planning, help us with the curriculum and what topics they wanted the kids to cover. Their jobs were to guide us, point us in the direction of success and support us in our formal observations. The observations, I should explain, could make or break us. Some were graded, others weren't, but they had the power to build and destroy our confidence in our abilities in equal measure. Unfortunately, we found that it was pure luck of the draw whether your school/teacher/overall placements was going to be a good one. Everyone I know, myself included, had a bad experience on placement, either there was a personality clash with the teacher, lack of guidance, lack of care if you succeeded or not, a bad observation. Tons of reasons, none of which were good enough reasons. I found that there were a lot of politics amongst the staff wherever you were. Underlying agendas and deep rooted feuds, never a good thing in a mainly female profession. Gloves were off and the bitchiness spread like wildfire.
  • Fionnbharr Rodgers
    Published 8 months ago
    More Money for Miss

    More Money for Miss

    There was a time when teaching was a highly desirable job which my grandparent’s generation would have aspired to on behalf of their children; teachers would have been thought of along with doctors, lawyers, and clergymen as pillars of the community, as is still the case in many societies, particularly across south-east Asia.
  • Alyssa Day
    Published 8 months ago
    The Best Teacher for the Student

    The Best Teacher for the Student

    A good teacher knows how to listen to their students and understand that, even though they appear young and carefree, they can have problems; some days are worse than others, they can have stress, or even become depressed. The teacher has to know how to get the students feeling better so that they can continue learning, so perhaps she can treat her students to something good for lunch like instant pot spaghetti squash or Mexican spaghetti. She knows that after a good lunch students will feel much better, and if anyone needs to talk to her some more she can arrange to meet them after class to find out what their problems are.
  • Donald Jefferson
    Published 8 months ago
    Public Education: Major Problems and How to Avoid Them

    Public Education: Major Problems and How to Avoid Them

    Unfortunately, it’s common knowledge that the public education system has a number of flaws. To address those, however, we have to acknowledge, and analyze them. Among these, there are small scale changes that students, parents, and teachers can make, as well as larger-scale problems that require legislative action. Here, we’re going to take a closer look at these problems, and some highly discussed solutions.
  • Stephanie Tomochi
    Published 8 months ago
    Private Maths Tutoring

    Private Maths Tutoring

    Hey! My name is Stephanie, and I am a young person living in London, who has completed the New GCSEs in 2018. If you are unaware of this new grading system for GCSEs, it is numerical from 9 to 1. This would be the comparison from the old system: