vintage

Vintage music and beat content throughout history and the music archives.

  • Aria Loves
    Published 2 months ago
    A 90s’ Baby With 50s’ Faves

    A 90s’ Baby With 50s’ Faves

    I was born in 1995, and I have a wide variety of favorite music. From the 20s to the 2000s. The music of the 50s makes me feel alive differently like I am going back in time in an era I’ve never been. Then again, who doesn’t like the classic older music? Especially jazz and rock and roll playing in the background of a movie, bars and some casinos.
  • Tiffany Linton
    Published 2 months ago
    Get Into This NOSTALGIA, Honey!

    Get Into This NOSTALGIA, Honey!

    There is nothing that makes me feel the way music makes me feel. Music is the gateway to my heart. Growing up in the Bronx from the late 90s into the early 2000s played a huge role in my musical knowledge. Every time I reminisce on my childhood, the music holds the centerpiece of my attention. I remember days when I would come home from school and my two older brothers and I had no responsibilities whatsoever. We would watch music videos all afternoon from Ashanti to TLC to Mariah Carey and Puff Daddy. When I started singing, I was around six years old and I sang Usher's Let It Burn to my mom and she smiled so hard! R&B music has been mighty tasteful to me from such an early age. Throughout my life I've always been drawn to learning more about it, especially because it is such an essential fragment of black culture. Simply growing up and hearing songs on the radio about love and relationships created an open door for me to do my research as a child. With that being said, I started singing The Temptations, The Jackson 5, The Supremes, Marvin Gaye, and all the other phenomenal Motown acts at only eleven years old. I fell in love with the 60s and there was nothing that I wanted more than a time traveling machine. Yes, I was aware that this was a very crucial and uncertain era for people of color, but the music alone made me want to take a trip back in time. Although I have a ton of love for the 60s, I also began dabbling into the 80s/90s. What y'all know about New Jack Swing? There is something about the roughness and sensuality of the way the instruments were incorporated into the music made by Bobby Brown, Babyface, New Edition, Guy and so many more! We call that "babymaking music." I'm always told that I have an old soul, and it shows in my music choice whenever I get a hold of the aux, but it's definitely prevalent in my fashion choice too. This era makes me realize that it's so much deeper than the music. The entertainment, the fashion, and music made it worthwhile. Remember oversized hoop earrings, high waist jeans and baggy windbreakers before we starting recycling those very same pieces today? Remember films like Love Jones and Sister Act 2? Even shows like Living Single and A Different World!
  • Rasma Raisters
    Published 3 months ago
    The Polish Prince of Music

    The Polish Prince of Music

    Bobby Vinton is an American pop singer and songwriter. He is of Polish heritage and in music circles he became known as “The Polish Prince”. One of his most popular songs “Blue Velvet” reached number one and became the inspiration for a movie by the same name.
  • angie fernando
    Published 3 months ago
    Go Solo

    Go Solo

    July,
  • frederick Hurst
    Published 3 months ago
    Why the Araia "Kennst du das land" has come to mean so much to me.

    Why the Araia "Kennst du das land" has come to mean so much to me.

    Artists often record pieces without appraising listeners of what a song may mean to them. This oversight usually occurs because of production demands that preclude verbal descriptions of what a given song may mean to an artist. Producing a polished CD or video is considerable, and producers are reluctant to spend their precious dollars on verbal tributes that can be made by recording artists during a concert. Once in the studio, artists are expected to record their music as quickly and efficiently. Reminiscing about the composition of a particular song is discouraged. Fortunately, the recording of this specific song did require the use of an expensive recording studio. When I recorded the piece, I had no neurotic producer hanging over my shoulder. I am therefore free to reflect on what the relatively unknown aria "kennst du das land." Those unfamiliar with opera are unlikely to recognize the piece. I first became familiar with the Aria after attending a performance of "Little Woman." An original operatic work, the production allowed me to hear a breath-taking musical score and the Aria "Kennst du das Land". I became determined to master the Aria in question. My years of training had provided me with the technical tools needed to sing a variety of styles, but I had always reframed from singing pieces written in German. The sheer beauty of the piece overwhelmed my reservation and set to work on it with passion and zeal. The experience has been transformative, allowing me to connect with a part of my German heritage that had always felt peripheral. Having to master German required that I steep myself in a language that members of the Hurst family line had practiced for generations. Learning "Kennst du das land" became a transformative experience, allowing me to reintegrate a disowned aspect of my family heritage. I am not the first, or only, singer to have had such an experience. Singing is an inherently personal process. Few performers become successful by relying solely upon their technical prowess. Acclaim rarely occurs unless a performer has found a way to merge technique and emotional resonance. For this singer at least, mastering the complexities of the Aria Kennst du das land became an example of such a process. It is why this previously unfamiliar piece now feels profoundly connected to my body and soul.
  • Mr. Eriq
    Published 3 months ago
    Third Place in 2020 Anthem Challenge
    Cafecito y Salsa

    Cafecito y Salsa

    Let’s face it: There are a few things that you can expect in every Latinx home on weekends. A pot of something bubbling away on the stove. The smell of strong coffee mixing with the perfume of that bottle of purple Fabuloso multi-purpose cleaner we all know too well and the queen of salsa playing like a bugle call for everyone in the house (and neighborhood for that matter) to wake up and get ready for a day full of dancing, cleaning, and eating. Even today, the first few seconds of Muñeca del Cha Cha Cha takes me back to my childhood games that my mother later confessed were ploys to get us to help clean the house.
  • Omie H
    Published 4 months ago
    Woodstock and the Vietnam War

    Woodstock and the Vietnam War

    On August 15th, 1969, four hundred thousand Americans gathered around Max Yasgur’s dairy farm in White Lake, New York. Fashioned to familiarize the concepts of free love, radical hippie movements, and drug culture, America presented one of the most inspiring and liberating music festivals of its time, Woodstock. The festival brought a great deal of noted musical artists to take part in the counterculture’s strategy in putting an end to the Vietnam War. The festival was able to flock together the American youths who had opposed views towards war. Woodstock furnished an alternative community for those who promoted peace and free-love known as the “hippie” community. With the Vietnam War happening half the world away, people’s stress towards the loss of great numbers of soldiers in the war grew and found no reason in their country’s inclusion in the mishap, especially the youths of the era due to their rebellious ideologies. This investigation will answer the question “How and to what extent did Woodstock influence the anti-war movement in the United States particularly during the Vietnam War between 1969 and 1975?” Society was slowly becoming segregated between people who supported it and those who opposed it. This gave Americans an initiative to bring the anti-war movement to light by taking control over mass media and altering people’s views regarding the Vietnam War. Throughout its development, Woodstock was argued to be just a group of people listening to music and did not create any effect in aiding the countercultural anti-war movement. Tom Wells states that the countercultural movement would have been more efficient and succeeded in ways more than one if it hadn’t focused so much on developing an attractive media-driven coating to attract youth.
  • Kevin Plumb
    Published 8 months ago
    Five Perfect Songs for a Smoky Gin Joint

    Five Perfect Songs for a Smoky Gin Joint

    As a Mystery author, I like that late night, smoke hanging in the air, gin-soaked jazz club feeling. Something about that noir atmosphere always intrigued me.
  • Armando Villa-Ignacio
    Published about a year ago
    Barbershop Music

    Barbershop Music

    "No, I can't do it, I can't sing." That is a phrase that irks me every time. Every. Single. Time. In reality, there is a small percentage that actually can't sing, and it's usually due to physical damage. That part of the population I'll exclude from this.
  • Marielle Sabbag
    Published about a year ago
    North Shore Music Theatre's Jersey Boys Is a Blast from the Past!

    North Shore Music Theatre's Jersey Boys Is a Blast from the Past!

    Join Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons on their tours around the world. Their music is an instantaneous hit that meets the ears!
  • Brendan Blowers
    Published about a year ago
    We Need to Remember John Coltrane’s Message Now More than Ever

    We Need to Remember John Coltrane’s Message Now More than Ever

    The musical output that John Coltrane produced in his lifetime is staggering, especially, considering that the saxophone player and composer’s life was cut short by liver cancer at the age of forty.
  • Lake Starr
    Published about a year ago
    My Own Piano Man

    My Own Piano Man

    I used to live in this apartment with these huge floor-to-ceiling windows, so I could see everyone on the street, and the building across the street, and best of all I had a perfect view of the horizon. At night I used to pull up a chair right up to the cold pane so my knees just brushed the glass. I’d pull out the book Frankenstein and turn off all the lights, so that I could read my book to the light of the sunset. I used to think of it as a ritual, a lullaby for me, and for the sun. I always enjoyed the experience of reading during the sunset, and that I had these moments to myself and nobody could take them from me.