History & Mystery

by Ross Sandlin 25 days ago in concert

Float Like A Buffalo Live @ The Lincoln 10/17/20

History & Mystery
Photography by Erin Callihan

Float Like A Buffalo is a Denver based Ska/Funk Rock band that brings unrestrained energy and driving anthems to a growing fan base of devoted listeners. Their impact has been growing for some time and is spilling across the Front Range of Colorado. Fresh off two sold out headlining shows at Red Rocks, and with a new EP due for release in late October, they are having a breakthrough year. On Saturday, October 17th they made their debut at the historic Lincoln Theater in Cheyenne, Wyoming. This famed venue was converted from a film theater that was originally built in 1929. The impressive concert hall typically seats 1,250 patrons and features a beautiful balcony. Their lavish greenroom is complete with antique boudoir furnishings and jukebox. Also, it is noteworthy that the venue did an excellent job enforcing all relevant COVID-19 protocols. Featuring support by Fort Collins based band Great Salmon Famine, and a large-scale production. The evening’s entertainment felt like a return to the emotional spirit of concerts.

The band’s performance featured a diverse range of ska, rock, funk, and unique covers that produced a nonstop flow of energy. The show began with saxophonist Luke Story parading onto the stage solo playing a funky interlude. He was joined by the remaining members as they filtered on stage for the opening number “Gimme Somethin”. This hard rock number featured intense guitar, ska horns, and dynamic musical motion that continuously reinforced the vocals. The following track was a very unique take on the Bill Withers classic “Use Me” that also mashed up the Ying Yang Twins and Little John collaboration “Get Low”. This musical medley incorporated a distinctive interpretation that centered around a hard rock pocket, and in general stood out as a delightful highlight of the performance.

The audience was also afforded the opportunity to hear the band’s upcoming EP, “Vertigo” in its entirety. This three-song portion of the show included some of the most diverse material of the evening. One stand out was the title track “Vertigo”, which builds from a soulful Reggae ballad to an all-out power ballad. Additionally, the propelling funk tune “FKA” provided a distinct cruising vibe and featured some of the best solos of the evening. The song selection continued with a steady diet of Ska, anthemic rock, and personalized interpretations of tasteful covers. After the band’s remarkable encore of “SOB” by Nathaniel Rateliff, they offered a heartfelt and genuine acknowledgment to the audience. Their departure from the stage concluded a robust evening of entertainment that was refreshing and engaging.

With larger than life energy, diverse material, and a growing audience of engaged listeners, Float Like A Buffalo is positioning themselves to continue their meteoric climb. From the outset the band demonstrated a coordinated and continuous display of energy. The main focus centering around the exchange between band mates and their audience, thereby building an immediate rapport. This allowed for significant emotional peaks that were repeatedly employed throughout the evening. As clear veterans of their craft, they were incredibly gratifying and fun to watch. Their enchanting frolics and musical cohesion created an evening of entertainment that was very needed in these times. If you want to get in of the fun and energy be sure to keep an eye out for more performances and new releases. Their new EP “Vertigo” dropped over the holiday weekend, with support from two sold out performances at the Soiled Dove in promotion of the release.

New EP “Vertigo”

Upcoming shows

Dec 11th The Oriental Theater

concert
Ross Sandlin
Ross Sandlin
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Ross Sandlin

Multi-instrumentalist, composer and producer living in Denver CO. In the spring of 2020 I began writing blogs and articles about the impact of Covid on professional musicians in Denver.

See all posts by Ross Sandlin