Skyler Sneathen

Skyler Sneathen

Full-time worker, history student and an avid comic book nerd.

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  • Skyler Sneathen
    Published a day ago
    Rob Zombie's Halloween -  Retrospective

    Rob Zombie's Halloween - Retrospective

    Some time ago that we debated and mostly criticized the idea of a remake of John Carpenter’s horror classic. It was tantamount to heresy that this musician turned filmmaker would remake such a film, by such a beloved director as John Carpenter. The remake opened at #1 with over $26 million and would go on to gross over $80 million worldwide. A financial success it was, the film was blasted by critics. Most of the backlash came less from just the remake aspect and more of the content of the film. Keep in mind critics do not always decide movies. John Carpenter’s Halloween was demolished by critics upon its initial arrival. Now, the original 1978 film is beloved by fans, critics and seen as the foundation for modern horror.
  • Skyler Sneathen
    Published a day ago
    It's...Alive?

    It's...Alive?

    We all grew up with them in one form or another. You saw the originals from Universal Studios, the Hammer films, or perhaps Francis Ford Coppola's takes on these classic icons. Dracula, Frankenstein, and the list goes on for the traditional Gothic horror lot. They have been with us for almost a century or longer if you are counting them as literary figures. They are beloved amongst many people across the world, but let's face the possibility that Gothic Horror may be coming to an end.
  • Skyler Sneathen
    Published 6 days ago
    The Death of Innocence on Elm Street

    The Death of Innocence on Elm Street

    Horror before the slasher genre permeates in a traditional, black-and-white world. Think Dracula, Wolf Man, and general gothic horror. In some of these films, the monster can have some sympathy from the audience. Tragedy comes into play as well. Nonetheless, this monster is still a force of evil, who meets their defeat by the shining white knight in a sense. A Nightmare on Elm Street goes against the type. No doubt, Freddy Krueger comes from tragedy and meets a demise by mob rule. However, we do not sympathize with him, regardless of the injustice of his death. With the time in America's history, A Nightmare on Elm Street represents a loss of innocence.
  • Skyler Sneathen
    Published 17 days ago
    Candyman and The Horror of Inner-City America

    Candyman and The Horror of Inner-City America

    There is one film that continues to haunt me. I not only watch it during October but at any time of the year. Maybe because I am also a horror maestro, and the film does not require the holiday of Halloween to enjoy and get the full effect, unlike the Halloween franchise per se'. Candyman, directed by Bernard Rose, starring Virginia Madsen and Tony Todd as our titular monster. I was aware of this film since 1992, seeing print ads, and being aware of the concept of a black movie monster with a hook for a hand. However, I never came to view until later in my college years.
  • Skyler Sneathen
    Published about a month ago
    Measuring The Success Of The Dark Knight III

    Measuring The Success Of The Dark Knight III

    We have the unusual success stories of two controversial works from Frank Miller. The first is The Dark Knight Strikes Again, meanwhile the other being All-Star Batman & Robin The Boy Wonder. In general, many fans dislike so far as to disown both comic stories. Many prefer to live in a world with Batman: Year One, The Dark Knight Returns, and that is it when it comes to Batman stories from the unequivocal Frank Miller. The Dark Knight III: Master Race begins with much dissent with that subtitle - Master Race. Many like to label Frank Miller as some silly, right-wing lunatic. Couple this rather base-minded assumption and the sub-title, many fans and critics begin to ready their pitchforks. With the bad press of Frank Miller's previous work and some political comments years prior that rubbed many the wrong way, does The Dark Knight III: Master Race stand a chance of success?
  • Skyler Sneathen
    Published about a month ago
    All-Star Batman & Robin The Boy Wonder, Not a Flop?

    All-Star Batman & Robin The Boy Wonder, Not a Flop?

    Almost all of Frank Miller's work post-Batman: Year One is easy to pick on. The Dark Knight Strikes Again is one of them, whereas some other works like 300 and Sin City can get a pass, at least more so than the rest. One piece for constant criticism is All-Star Batman & Robin The Boy Wonder. Many like to critique this as a complete flop. But really? This comic is quite the success if anything.