Raphael Kiyani

Raphael Kiyani

Freelance Writer. Passionate about Politics, Visual Arts, Writing and London.

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  • Raphael Kiyani
    Published 3 years ago
    10 Funny Moments from the Houses of Parliament

    10 Funny Moments from the Houses of Parliament

    The grand Palace of Westminster, containing the House of Commons and the House of Lords is the heart of political power in the United Kingdom. Known as "The Mother of Parliaments" due to its form of Parliamentary Democracy, it has inspired countless other democratic systems across the planet, and is an almost timeless institution that vast numbers of people instantly recognise. The British Parliament has been a centre for heated debate, representation and leadership. In its midst, empires have fallen, wars have been organised and fought and seismic social changes have been ushered in. Despite the sheer historic importance of the British Parliament, there have been a number of downright funny moments that have emerged from such a serious institution as this, especially in recent years. Members of Parliament (MP’s) bickering, throwing insults and just generally being comical has, perhaps, helped to increase the amount of apathy towards politics, but it has also resulted in demonstrating that politics is not always a sombre affair, but a humorous, lighthearted occupation at times, too.
  • Raphael Kiyani
    Published 3 years ago
    Why I Love Animal Crossing

    Why I Love Animal Crossing

    The Nintendo Switch launched on 3rd March 2017, ushering a new start and era for Nintendo. Out of all their IP's (Intellectual Property) Animal Crossing is one of the safest bets to make a return. Coupled with the fact that we've been without a new title since 2013 it's about time Animal Crossing makes a comeback. It's a franchise that sells by the bucket-loads and has become one of Nintendo's flagship franchises in breaking the so called mold between the hobbyist gamer and the casual gamer. But why do I and others love it so much? Well that's what I'm here to talk about, though I hopefully won't ramble on as much as Blathers.
  • Raphael Kiyani
    Published 3 years ago
    Why The UK Needs Electoral Reform

    Why The UK Needs Electoral Reform

    The 2015 General Election came and went, delivering a Conservative majority government with Labour failing to engage the electorate as a credible alternative and ended up having less seats than they did after the 2010 General Election, which must have been disappointing and shocking in equal measure to the Labour leadership. The Scottish National Party (SNP), as predicted, swept through Scotland gaining a landslide, winning 56 out of 59 seats. Nicola Sturgeon's bold conviction and a presentation of a new progressive form of politics tuned in to the social beating heart of Scotland. The Liberal Democrats faced the wrath of the electorate, getting pulverised with only 8 seats being won with heavy ministerial losses such as Vince Cable (Business Secretary) and Danny Alexander (Treasury). In many constituencies they were behind both the UK Independence Party (UKIP) and the Greens. The explosion of the UKIP movement failed to make an impact on the Commons with only one seat being won whilst Nigel Farage failed to win South Thanet. This, in particular, brought the issue of electoral reform back into the public consciousness.