Erin Egnatz

Erin Egnatz

I love writing about and investigating haunted places throughout the US as well as the history behind them. Follow me on Instagram and Facebook @hauntingsaroundamerica as I go on investigations and explore these places in real time.

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  • Erin Egnatz
    Published a day ago
    The Ghosts of Springdale Cemetery

    The Ghosts of Springdale Cemetery

    About The Cemetery: Springdale Cemetery, located in the central Illinois city of Peoria is the beautiful final resting place of over 78,000 people. The cemetery, dating back to 1855, is massive encompassing roughly 233 acres of rolling hills just off of the Illinois River. The cemetery also has a large public mausoleum as well as fifteen private mausoleum's, each grander than the next.
  • Erin Egnatz
    Published 13 days ago
    Hauntings of Williamsburg

    Hauntings of Williamsburg

    History Williamsburg, Virginia is one of the oldest cities in American history. Dating back to around the 1630’s when it was part of the Commonwealth of Virginia, becoming its capital in 1699. Before being a colony to the new settlers, the area that is now Williamsburg was occupied by the Powhatan Confederacy, which made up at least six Native American tribes. As we know, the tribes were gradually forced out of the area over time, and those times were not always peaceful leading to bloodshed along the way.
  • Erin Egnatz
    Published 14 days ago
    Ghosts at the Old Lake County Jail

    Ghosts at the Old Lake County Jail

    Northwest Indiana is home to Crown Point, Indiana, just 45 miles outside of Chicago. Crown Point is known to me as my hometown, but to the rest of America, it is known as the location of John Dillinger’s infamous jail break in 1934. John Dillinger, a cocky man who was as brazen as he was charming, was arrested for a previous escape out of Michigan City’s prison in 1933. The Crown Point jail was said to be inescapable and authorities made sure to boast that “fact” as often as they could. While at the jail, a press conference was held, Dillinger was of course in attendance. He appeared completely at ease during the press conference and even leaned his arm on the shoulder of the prosecutor, smiling and laughing as if he were at a party. Not long after he was captured, a little over a month, he made his escape from the jail while using a fake gun carved out of wood. To add to the embarrassment of the local officials, he escaped in none other than the sheriff’s car. He remained on the run for a few more months until he was gunned down in Chicago in July of 1934, just outside of the Biograph Theater (another location to be featured very soon).
  • Erin Egnatz
    Published 14 days ago
    Lincoln's Ghost Train

    Lincoln's Ghost Train

    Abraham Lincoln was the 16th president of the United States. His presidency was one full of turmoil as the great rebellion known as The Civil War took place during his time as Commander in Chief. The war came to an end on April 9, 1865, with up to a million dead and many more casualties. Five days after Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia, President Lincoln attended a show at Ford's Theatre in Washington D.C. There, he was shot by Maryland native, John Wilkes Booth. The following day, April 15, 1865, President Lincoln passed away from the wound he sustained in the shooting. The nation mourned, as any would, during this unprecedented time. Because of the overwhelming pain felt by the country, it was decided that the president would be taken from city to city in the norther states so that the citizens could say a final goodbye to their president. A funeral train was commissioned to take the president's body on the 1,600 mile journey, with stops across the nation for mourners, from D.C. to his final resting place in Springfield, Illinois on May 3rd.
  • Erin Egnatz
    Published 15 days ago
    Haunted Stones River National Battlefield

    Haunted Stones River National Battlefield

    Just outside of Nashville, in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, is Stones River National Battle Field. It is here that the Battle of Stones River occurred from December 3, 1862 until January 2nd of 1863. Over 78,000 men from the Union and Confederate sides clashed in this three day battle. The clash resulted in more than 24,000 casualties and almost 3,000 dead. The battle was a Union victory, with the Confederate's withdrawing on January 3rd.