Dylan Copeland

Dylan Copeland

I've been writing short stories for years now, guys. You've probably read one of mine already, you just didn't know it. Or maybe you did and you didn't like it, who knows.

How does it work?
  • Dylan Copeland
    Published 4 months ago
    I Don't Like Star Wars

    I Don't Like Star Wars

    I don't like Star Wars. That's the crux of this article, pretty much. Just by the title alone, you have already formed an opinion on me. That is the power of Star Wars, the proof of the immense reach that this franchise has on popular culture. If anything, Star Wars is the rare kind of beast that transcends popular culture and simply becomes part of every day life. It is a completely unavoidable, unstoppable, unkillable monstrosity and I do not care for it.
  • Dylan Copeland
    Published 3 years ago
    Sonic CD

    Sonic CD

    After the success of the first game in the series, Sonic the Hedgehog 1, Sega knew they had to capitalise on the Sonic brand as much as they could. Thus, a sequel was created by Sega of America, tentatively titled Sonic the Hedgehog 2. At the same time, however, in Sega of Japan, work started on another Sonic the Hedgehog title, destined for the soon to be released Sega CD, an additional peripheral for the Sega Mega Drive/Genesis that would allow it to play games on a CD, instead of a cartridge. Two separate games were being created in tandem by the same company in two different countries. One story states that Sonic CD was supposed to be an enhanced port of Sonic 2 for the Sega CD, another states that Sonic 2 and Sonic CD were developed in two different countries simply to create two different games with two different visions. Sega of America updated the Sonic sprite for their release, but the sprite from Sonic CD is remarkably similar to that of Sonic 1, leading credence to the theory that the games were being created in tandem but without interference or communication from the other side, that being Sega of America creating their own new sprites while Sega of Japan stuck with some of their older assets.
  • Dylan Copeland
    Published 3 years ago
    Sonic the Hedgehog 4

    Sonic the Hedgehog 4

    Sega, during the early to mid nineties, were on fire with their main series Sonic the Hedgehog games. Sonic the Hedgehog 1, 2 and 3 (and Knuckles) sold very well and all were considered instant classics at the time, and still considered to be classics even now. While Sega were busy creating these main series games and polishing them to be as fine as they could be, there were an awful lot of other Sonic the Hedgehog related games that were released around the same time, to placate the fans and to generate as much lovely money as they could. Come the invention of three dimensions in video games however, Sega found themselves in difficulties. A false start with their home console, the Sega Saturn, led to no new main series Sonic the Hedgehog games being created for it, instead their ideas being carried over and focused on their newer machine, the Dreamcast. This eventually resulted in the first fully 3D platforming Sonic the Hedgehog game, Sonic Adventure.
  • Dylan Copeland
    Published 3 years ago
    Sonic the Hedgehog 3 (and Knuckles)

    Sonic the Hedgehog 3 (and Knuckles)

    Sega found themselves in an interesting situation after the release of Sonic the Hedgehog 2, a game that improved over the original and was an incredible exercise in level design and overall game creation. It was a success, and they knew they could equal or even outdo that success with another game in the series. The question they found themselves asking is "where do we go from here?" and they were able to answer that question, eventually.
  • Dylan Copeland
    Published 3 years ago
    Frank Goodberry

    Frank Goodberry

    Frank Goodberry sighs loudly and throws another crunched up piece of paper into the wastepaper bin that sits against the wall, between his filing cabinet and his liquor cabinet. The liquor cabinet sees an awful lot more use than the filing cabinet does, that's for sure. There's very little inside that filing cabinet, as early into his career Frank Goodberry decided he probably didn't need to file that much stuff, so he wouldn't bother. It's a bit of a waste of space, to be honest, but his wife insisted he get one. It's been seven years since he had an actual job, a real tangible job, the kind of job that government officials are always trying to tout the numbers of. The kind of job where you get a regular pay check in return for providing some kind of service, such as working in a shop or filling things with concrete. Frank Goodberry hasn't had one of those jobs for seven years. For the last seven years he has been trying to make it on his own, trying to become self employed, self reliable, self something else. Working for the man no longer interests him, he's had enough of 'the Man', whoever that is. Unfortunately for Frank Goodberry, he's not had a great time of earning money without the interference of 'the Man'.
  • Dylan Copeland
    Published 3 years ago
    Sonic the Hedgehog 2

    Sonic the Hedgehog 2

    Sonic the Hedgehog was a huge success on it's original release for the Sega Mega Drive/Genesis in 1991, becoming a real, legitimate rival for Nintendo who dominated the video game market at the time with their mascot, Super Mario. Sonic the Hedgehog changed the game and showed that there was room at the top for two. Sega needed to capitalise on this newfound success, and they did so with the release of the imaginatively titled Sonic the Hedgehog 2, also released for the Sega Mega Drive/Genesis a year after the original, in 1992. Since its release it has been ported and rereleased on all sorts of different video gaming platforms, most recently for mobile devices in 2013 in a remastered version.