Dillon Staples

Dillon Staples

My name is Dillon Staples. I am a sophomore at Eastern University in Pennsylvania. I am a Political Science major and History minor. Political criticism falls on deaf ears when respect is absent. 

  • Dillon Staples
    Published about a year ago
    Protecting the Next Generation: School Shootings

    Protecting the Next Generation: School Shootings

  • Dillon Staples
    Published about a year ago
    Illegal Immigration: Unpopular Opinion

    Illegal Immigration: Unpopular Opinion

    Every article that I researched to use as a reference for this piece was highly partisan. The notion that a consistent centrist source exists about illegal immigration is false. In modern society, the news determines not only what is important, but what perception is held about certain policies. The left and right have been in contention about the correct course of action in regards to immigration for years. This will not be an article arguing the figures of illegal immigration, but rather the philosophical pitfall of viewing immigration through a partisan lens.
  • Dillon Staples
    Published about a year ago
    No Backbone: The Millennial’s Integrity Struggle

    No Backbone: The Millennial’s Integrity Struggle

    Millennials spend large amounts of time on social media, hence the reason it has become the platform most used for the spread of misinformation. Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat, and every other big brand social media outlet all started out with their own respective purposes. As time went on and the market moved forward, to stay competitive, each outlet added more features within their respective software. All of the apps aforementioned all have a news feature, but the pretenses upon which they were founded do not have a direct need for one. Facebook started out as a way for friends to network with each other, and potentially see friends of friends, but it is now one of the biggest outlets responsible for "fake news." Twitter originated as a simple way to share thoughts with the world in 140 characters, but it is now home to massive amounts of misinformation. Social media has been perverted while trying to expand due to the market’s demand.
  • Dillon Staples
    Published about a year ago
    Dying Democracy: The Collapse of Compromise

    Dying Democracy: The Collapse of Compromise

    If one were to ask anyone that predates the millenials about the current political atmosphere, responses tend to be of similar nature. Despite political affiliation, everyone seems to have a strong distaste for the polarization of politics. The response is often, “back in the Reagan-Clinton era and before that, people could discuss politics, civilly.” That comment often precedes the observation, “I do not know how we ended up here.” So how did the U.S. become entrapped in the disease of polarization?