Aleesa Rudder

Aleesa Rudder

I'm a mother above all with a passion for farming, games, writing, and animals. As a member of FFA, MFTHBA, and an aspiring vet, I strive to care for others and stand professionally in all I do.

  • Aleesa Rudder
    Published 9 months ago
    Gardening for Everyone

    Gardening for Everyone

    Apartment living can get expensive, especially when you've got a big grocery bill and you barely eat the amount of food you buy! Some people solve this by grocery splitting with neighbors (I.E. your neighbors buy the potatoes and you take half while you buy the lettuce and they take half) or donating extra food to local firefighters or shelters. While those are great ways to cut that bill, there's an easier way to save money on food, know where your food comes from, and start an interesting new hobby!
  • Aleesa Rudder
    Published 11 months ago
    Egg-Sactly What You Need to Know

    Egg-Sactly What You Need to Know

    Many people are squawking about animals and what's happening with them. We've heard many different sides ranging from industrializing more to stopping the use altogether. I stand somewhere in the middle. As you can see by my bio, I am a farmer. I grew up on a production farm for Tyson's and saw everything that happened—and exactly how it happened. I have to say, a lot of the stories are huge exaggerations. The houses aren't as crowded as they make it out to be, chickens aren't filled with steroids, and they certainly aren't brutally hurt at that stage. However, I am still against it. I can imagine some of you are surprised at that after me standing up for it. Let's think about chickens though. The chickens used for meat don't lay eggs. They don't do much, actually. I've experimented a bit, and put some in an outside lifestyle to see what they did. They really just sat around and walked to food and water as they needed then laid back down, even in the event of predators. Within recent years I bought some laying chickens. The difference was phenomenal.
  • Aleesa Rudder
    Published 11 months ago
    The Day I Became an Angel

    The Day I Became an Angel

    I've always loved horses. There are pictures of me on horses before I was able to walk. I've diligently collected everything horses, from registration papers to saddles to statues to toys and even paintings for as long as I can remember. I started with barrel racing and of course had a Quarter Horse. After years of failing I gave up and moved to riding Missouri Fox Trotters. My first Fox Trotter was a huge 15+ white gelding with a yellow mane and tail. He literally looked like something you'd see in a book about a princess waiting for her knight in shining armor. He saved my life twice, once when I got lost in a lightning storm, and again when an angry bull tried to kill me. Needless to say he made an impression on me that would never be forgotten. I started showing another Fox Trotter who was a short bay mare. I loved it. After a while we had to sell the show horses and my childhood dreams of winning the World Grand Championship were washed away. I found another cheap Quarter Horse and went back to barrel racing. After a while the novelty of it wore off and I remembered why I left Quarter Horses in the first place. So the hunt was on for another Fox Trotter to ride. At this point I had trained my barrel horse enough that I could sell him and get money for a fair show horse. So I listed him and started checking out what was on the market. I came to a Fox Trotter group on Facebook that rescues horses from the kill pen and decided to join. I never expected to find anything for myself. As days passed I found trail horses, foals, and horses listed for such a price I'd have to spend two years earning the money. Then one day I scrolled onto a horse posted in the rescue group. The first words I saw were "registered Missouri Fox Trotter mare." For those that don't know much about kill pens, it's where unwanted horses get sent to die. When you sell to kill buyer you're lucky to get an eighth of what your horse is worth so the main horses I expected to see neglected, injured, sick, or highly aggressive. Seeing that a Fox Trotter was there was a shock and it being a registered mare even more so. As I watched the videos and looked at the pictures I could tell she was none of what I thought. She was beautiful with a flowing gait and such a sweet personality... the last thing I came to was her papers and I nearly choked. Her bloodlines were some of the best I had ever seen and her father was one of my favorite horses. Immediately I called my grandpa (who used to breed Fox Trotters) and told him about the mare. He was hesitant because like me he never expected anything even able to survive to be there. We eventually decided she was too good to leave, even if she did have issues. After a couple days we were ready to leave and get her. We drove four hours to get her. When we went to catch her I saw fear in her eyes. The truck to ship her and others to their deaths was two days from arriving. I still wonder if she thought we were that truck. On the way home we stopped to get gas and I went to the trailer to check on her. She had calmed down and looked at me with thankful eyes. That look of exhaustion and peace still feels like it just happened. She knew she was sent to die. On the first day home I gave her some fresh hay and water. That's when I learned that she likes to play with buckets. After finishing the first bit of water she grabbed the side of the bucket and slung it onto the ground. The look she gave seemed like she was laughing. The second time I filled the bucket she splashed the water with her nose then again threw it and the remaining contents on the ground. That time I laughed! Most horses would've jumped the trailer if they saw that spectacle, but she did it for fun. After a few hours of resting she went to the vet to be checked out. Nothing was wrong with her. That's where it gets confusing. She is in perfect health, she's gentle and broke to ride, she has amazing papers, and is show horse material. Absolutely nothing to land her in a kill pen. I still can't figure it out. Of course, that doesn't matter now. Now, she's safe, standing in the barn watching the rain fall outside. She will never face that fate again.
  • Aleesa Rudder
    Published 11 months ago
    Subtly Modern

    Subtly Modern

    Today it seems everything is done over your cellphone. Many times I come across a website that requires a verification code through a text, to which I sigh and exit the page. I live down a dead-end road with my only contact points being the internet and a house phone. Cell phones are now almost required to survive in the modern age. This can be very troubling for those who choose to live without one.
  • Aleesa Rudder
    Published 11 months ago
    Missouri Fox Trotter

    Missouri Fox Trotter

    The Missouri Fox Trotter is a breed of horse known for their ability to achieve greatness in almost every equestrian sport there is. They achieve this with a smooth ride that many riders call a "rocking chair" gait. This gait, known as the Fox Trot, is often enjoyed by people with arthritis and other joint issues. The Fox Trotter's natural ability to do the Fox Trot also gives them remarkable footing on most any terrain. They are also naturally gentle natured and so have often been used as a family horse in the past. You can find Fox Trotters competing in events from barrel racing to dressage and even jumping. However, they are at their peak performance when used in specialized shows put on by the Missouri Fox Trotting Horse Breed Association (MFTHBA). These shows put the horses to the test by judging their walk, trot, and canter. Horses entered in these shows are registered with the MFTHBA and meet standards of care and conformation before entering the ring. The biggest of these shows is hosted in Ava, Missouri during the Spring and Fall of each year. The show holds divisions for both youth and seniors. Classes include 2 gaits, 3 gaits, equitation, western pleasure, barrel racing, and halter, as well as a costume contest. Lately the Association has included a dog show which tends to be quite entertaining. There is also a program called Fox Trot America that collects points by both rider and horse (counted by the number of hours spent of trail rides). This features a rewards system, giving better rewards as you gain more points. Fox Trot America also hosts National Trail Rides for Missouri Fox Trotters. There are several tiers based on how many National Trail Rides you attend and complete with rewards at each tier.
  • Aleesa Rudder
    Published 11 months ago
    Young Motherhood

    Young Motherhood

    There's so much others have to say about people who have a baby early. Some support those mothers while others shun them. There's so many aspects to this that it's hard to draw a clear conclusion. A big part is how it started. Was it on purpose? Do they have jobs or a house? Are they mature? Have they finished school? All of these questions come into play as for how one should react.