Faux Leather Backpack: Switching Your Old Leather Accessories

A faux leather backpack is a cruelty-free way to stay fashionable without compromising on quality.

Faux Leather Backpack: Switching Your Old Leather Accessories

A faux leather backpack is a cruelty-free way to stay fashionable without compromising on quality.

In recent decades, one has been able to find a variety of headlines demonising the use of fur within the fashion industry, but what about leather?

Leather production, in the sense of ‘by-product’ at least, depends upon a number of factors. For example, the type of animal used, to the usefulness of said animal as meat. Therefore, you can’t simply just shrug leather manufacturing off as a case of ‘2-for-1,’ when it is not the case.

In fact, this does not even begin to factor in the detrimental impacts to which leather production has on the environment, and the general health of the workers who produce this material. This is where goBambu, the Vegan leather rucksack, and the ingenious use of Kraft Paper, all intertwine to produce not only a stylish accessory, but one you can be proud to wear.

So, let’s take a dive into the reasons why you should be switching to the goBag Vegan Leather Rucksack.

WHY SWITCH TO A FAUX LEATHER BACKPACK?

The faux leather backpack offers bountiful opportunities to the aspiring fashionista, with the ethical solutions it provides coming top of that list! As we have briefly explored, leather is not just the leftovers from meat production.

For example, reptiles are used almost entirely for their skin, with there being no other viable use for it. How is this any different to the fur industry, which has become so socially unacceptable?

In fact, PETA stated how more than one billion animals across the world are slaughtered to be used as leather each year. This is an astounding statistic and demonstrates the needless use of these animals when a much better alternative exists.

If fur farming was abolished due to the needless use of animals, then leather should follow suit; especially when a more advanced, non-harmful alternative exists in the form of Kraft Paper.

POLLUTING EFFECT OF LEATHER PRODUCTION

Not only is the production of leather unnecessarily utilising animals, but it is also causing harm to the environment.

Although most factories in America and Europe are no longer allowed to tan leather using toxic materials – such as chromium – places like China, where a substantial amount of the leather production happens, does not follow the same guidelines.

This means that harmful chemicals are being consistently pumped into the water systems by workers whom themselves are being negatively affected by the carcinogenic properties of the chemicals.

Hence, when we begin to take a deeper glance into the environmental, ethical and health concerns relating to the production of leather, is it really worth it?

Well, turns out, no. Any benefits typically associated with leather, such as its durability, washability, versatility, and every other ‘atility’ one can think of, can all be directly transferred onto Kraft Paper.

Some even call it ‘washable paper’ as it can withstand a good clean with a damp cloth. It’s so durable that you can even grab an old (Bamboo) toothbrush and some soapy water to clean it!

With its washable nature, and durability, you can be sure that this material will indeed stand the test of time.

Dare we say longer than any leather product?

WHAT MAKES KRAFT PAPER AND FAUX LEATHER SO ECO FRIENDLY?

Leather production can be a strong, toxic pollutant – not just to water systems and the environment, but also to our general health. However, Kraft Paper takes away this concern almost entirely.

Whilst being light weight and tear resistant, the natural fibres from which this fabric gets its very essence, makes Kraft Paper biodegradable (obviously after its many, many years of use!). Hence, in addition to easily becoming at one with the earth again, the product can be recycled multiple times.

Absolutely nothing goes to waste.

Not only is this material washable and resistant like traditional leather, it causes little to no negative environmental impacts. Now, who wouldn’t choose this clever little product over outdated leather?

WHERE DO THE RUCKSACKS ACTUALLY COME FROM?

Kraft Paper comes from natural fibres, originally sourced from an FSC-certified forest in Germany (our Kraft Paper is already recycled). The manufacturers of these fibres – so the people that turn the paper in the beautiful rucksack – are based in Hong Kong.

As pioneers in the field, with only a handful of these makers based worldwide, they create eco friendly products for almost all your day-to-day fashion needs. From our sleek rucksacks, to drawstring and tote bags, there is simply no longer a market for leather production. Kraft Paper has taken the crown on this one.

Don’t just take the companies’ word for it, the certificates obtained by SGS, GRS and Amfori BSCI speak for themselves.

Whilst SGS ensures that the products and services all adhere to global regulations from ‘raw materials to final consumption;’ the GRS (Global Recycle Standard) certificate confirms the company maintains excellent environmental and working conditions.

Finally, the Amfori BSCI certification ensures a sustainable and fair practice is always carried out. You can always be sure that the environment, and the workers are all treated fairly and to a beyond-acceptable level.

HOW TO PURCHASE A VEGAN LEATHER RUCKSACK

To call this accessory an ‘alternative’ to leather is to demean the essence of this innovative material…but we must wait until it inevitably becomes mainstream: something you can help with.

By choosing a Kraft Paper Rucksack, not only will an animal’s life be saved, but also further destruction to the environment will be prevented.

This 100% vegan product is spacious, versatile, and fully adjustable. Heading to work with your laptop and lunch in tow? Hopping on a plane for a getaway? This rucksack can do it all. So, choose ethical fashion: goBambu for the ultimate faux leather backpack!

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Andrew Groves
See all posts by Andrew Groves