Tips for Pet-Proofing the New House You Are Building

by Craig Middleton 10 days ago in how to

Designing and building a new home that is all your own can be a thrilling process. You probably don’t want to see your brand-new, beautiful investment thrashed by your pets shortly after you move in.

Tips for Pet-Proofing the New House You Are Building
Photo by William Daigneault on Unsplash

Designing and building a new home that is all your own can be a thrilling process. You probably don’t want to see your brand-new, beautiful investment thrashed by your pets shortly after you move in. Taking care during the planning process to choose pet friendly finishes throughout your house can help you make sure your new abode stays in top condition for years to come.

Doors

Doors can be one of the most vulnerable areas when it comes to dogs, especially teething puppies. Dogs may use the corners as chew toys. They also learn quickly that doors provide access to their people in the next room, the yard or other places that appeal to them. As such, when access is denied, they may scratch at the door when they want to get through. Whether you are planning to use common hollow core doors or were hoping to select something a little more elegant, such as glass pantry doors with custom designs etched on, quality and durability will be key considerations for standing up to your pets. Another way to help your doors last, though, is to add reinforcement. Metal kick plates and corner protectors are effective ways of blocking a dog from being able to scratch and chew directly on the door. Depending on how you install them, you may even be able to replace them periodically if they start to get a bit too tattered-looking.

Floors

Flooring is another point of vulnerability against your furry friends. If your dog is high-energy and known to peel out when he or she is alerted to something interesting, such as food, scratch marks may be a possibility. If the dog likes to “fluff” his or her bed, even when that bed is a hard floor, scratch marks are almost certain to accumulate!

You might feel like, short of concrete, there aren’t really any flooring options that will truly stand up to your furry family. However, manufacturers are responding to consumers’ desires to have kid-proof, pet-proof and all-around life-proof flooring.

Do you love tile, but dislike its susceptibility to chipping and cracking and the high-maintenance grout that comes with it? Is a natural wood look more your thing, but you worry about digs, scratches, waxing and so on? Technology has advanced tremendously, providing you with options that offer a remarkable likeness to tile, wood and other things, but using far more indestructible materials such as vinyl and laminate.

Don’t be too quick to dismiss concrete, though, because some truly amazing designs can be accomplished with that substance. Marble, granite, wood planks or herringbone, porcelain tile and many other looks can be replicated in concrete. Even artwork and realistic textures are possible.

Doggy Areas

One issue that often plagues pet owners is when the pet slips up on his or her potty training. Especially difficult can be when they wet in the wrong place, as it can spread far, wide and deep throughout a larger area of the floor. Holding it in for long periods of time, such as overnight or while you are away at work, can be challenging for some pets.

If your pets struggle with those issues, or if you are planning to adopt an untrained puppy or kitten, there are still ways you can mitigate such occurrences. One option is to design safe, contained outdoor access into your new-home build from the start. Consider adding a small, fully fenced pet pen off to one side of your house and a doggy door for 24/7 access. To protect your pets from dangers while unsupervised, and prevent them from getting out and becoming a liability, you will need tall fencing that cannot be climbed or jumped, as well as a lock on the gate. If predators are possible where you live, you will also need to cover the pen, using mesh or chicken wire for example, especially if your animals are medium or small.

While the above options cover some of the most common ways pets can cause damage, these are only a few of your choices for addressing those problems. Give yourself peace of mind by taking steps now to prevent problems later.

how to
Craig Middleton
Craig Middleton
Read next: Calling All Wannabe Pet Owners
Craig Middleton
See all posts by Craig Middleton