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Dogs Behaviour.

How does your dog behave around you?

By Rahab KimondoPublished 15 days ago 3 min read
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Dogs Behaviour.
Photo by Angel Luciano on Unsplash

Dog behavior problems are often misunderstood or mishandled by dog owners. Thoroughly understanding the most common dog behavior problems is the first step to solving and preventing them. A solid foundation of obedience training will help you prevent or better control many of these issues.

1. Barking.

Most dogs vocalize in one way or another. They may bark, howl and whine. Excessive barking is considered a behavior problem.

Before you can correct excessive barking, determine why your dog is vocalizing in the first place. The most common types of barking are:

• Warning or alert

• Playfulness and excitement

• Attention-seeking

• Anxiety

• Boredom

• Responding to other dogs

2. Chewing.

Chewing is a natural action for all dogs. In fact, chewing is an important activity for most dogs; it's just part of the way they are wired. However, excessive chewing can quickly become a behavior problem if your dog causes destruction. The most common reasons dogs chew include:

• Puppy teething

• Boredom or excess energy

• Anxiety

• Curiosity (especially puppies)

Encourage your dog to chew on the right things by providing plenty of appropriate chew toys. Keep personal items away from your dog. When you are not home, keep your dog crated or confined to an area where less destruction can be caused.

If you catch your dog chewing the wrong thing, quickly distract your dog with a sharp noise. Then, replace the item with a chew toy. One of the most important things you can do is to make sure your dog gets plenty of exercise so it can wear off energy and be stimulated in that way rather than turning to chewing.

3. Digging.

If given the chance, most dogs will do some amount of digging; it's a matter of instinct. Certain dog breeds, like terriers, are more prone to digging because of their hunting histories. In general, most dogs dig for these reasons:

• Boredom or excess energy

• Anxiety or fear

• Hunting instinct

• Comfort-seeking (such as nesting or cooling off)

• Desire to hide possessions (like bones or toys)

• To escape or gain access to an area

It can get rather frustrating if your dog likes to dig up your yard. Try and determine the cause of the digging, then work to eliminate that source. Give your dog more exercise, spend more quality time together, and work on extra training. If digging seems inevitable, set aside an area where your dog can freely dig, like a sandbox. Train your dog that it is acceptable to dig in this area only.

4. Chasing.

A dog's desire to chase moving things is simply a display of predatory instinct. Many dogs will chase other animals, people, and cars. All of these can lead to dangerous and devastating outcomes. While you may not be able to stop your dog from trying to chase, you can take steps to prevent disaster.

• Keep your dog confined or on a leash at all times (unless directly supervised indoors).

• Train your dog to come when called.

• Have a dog whistle or noisemaker on hand to get your dog's attention.

• Stay aware and watch for potential triggers, like joggers.

Your best chance at success is to keep the chase from getting out of control. Dedicated training over the course of your dog's life will teach him to focus his attention on you first, before running off.

5. Jumping up.

Jumping up is a common and natural behavior in dogs. Puppies jump up to reach and greet their mothers. Later, they may jump up when greeting people. Dogs may also jump up when excited or seeking an item in the person's hands. A jumping dog can be annoying and even dangerous.

There are many methods to stop a dog's jumping, but not all will be successful. Lifting a knee, grabbing the paws, or pushing the dog away might work in some cases, but for most dogs, this sends the wrong message. Jumping up is often attention-seeking behavior, so any acknowledgment of your dog's actions provide an instant reward, reinforcing the jumping.

The best method is to simply turn away and ignore your dog. Walk away if necessary. Do not make eye contact, speak, or touch your dog. Go about your business. When he relaxes and remains still, calmly reward him. It won't take long before your dog gets the message.

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About the Creator

Rahab Kimondo

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Comments (3)

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  • Beth14 days ago

    Amazing content.

  • Gigi14 days ago

    Nicely done.

  • betty joyirungu15 days ago

    Insightful

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