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Inequalities

by Eva 2 months ago in economy
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A day in the life of more fortunate people #1 #2 and #3

Inequalities
Photo by Daniel Barnes on Unsplash

Inequalities #1

Driving in our car, we pass many poverty-stricken people. Although there is not much poverty in Finland, I am glad that am not one of them. Wishing I could give them some of my many classes and books. Starting the day with an excruciatingly boring cello lesson, it finally ends. Walking through the hallway with high ceilings, I look forward to my extension English class. Strutting into my classroom, I am glad I am not sitting out in the cold begging for money.

Finally, after a long day of studying hard, and preparing for my science career, I walk home. On the way, I dig some spare change out of my pockets and give it to the needier people. When home, I get changed, grab a blanket, and flop onto the couch. Searching the many shelves for an interesting book, I finally find one. Grabbing the book, I flop onto the couch yet again and snuggle up by the fire. Glad that my parents have enough money to own their own home with heating. After a read, I have a pleasant nap, by the comforting fire.

Rolling out of bed the next day, I dawdle to the dining, expecting a full-on delicious breakfast. As I expected, there on the table is a full-fledged breakfast. Perfectly-cooked bacon, scrambled eggs, and cheesy kransky's. After eating the delicious meal, I walk back to my room and get dressed for the day ahead. Walking over to my music room, I see the slim figure of my frail, considerate teacher. My parents have already left for work; saving for my college fees. My father being a doctor and my mother being a professor. Starting my piano lesson, I play Alexander Scriabin- Mysterium ( that is a very complex piece by the way).

Inequalities #2

Although my parents- and maybe a little bit me-may be a little snobbish, I have come to realise that life may be perfect for us but overall is very unfair. I realise that some people in this world aren't as privileged as us. As much as I would like to be a scientist and learn things from my extension classes, I have decided to try to help the less fortunate people. Starting with quitting piano and cello. Using the money that would've paid for my piano and cello lessons-which my parents disagree with- I make bags of food and necessities. Dolefully, I put one of my few, least favourite books in each bag. I ask my chauffeur- someone who drives me around -to transport me downtown; where poor people are more common.

Driving downtown is unfamiliar as my parents would never allow me there due to the great number of homeless populations. Delivering the bags, I realise that downtown is not as dangerous as I have been brought up to believe. I go into the makeshift school and notice the lack of furniture and teaching supplies. Wanting to help, I return home and load some furniture and teaching supplies from school into the back of a hired delivery truck. Once all the supplies have been taken out and placed in the school, it is a whole new place. Returning home the second time, I feel like I have accomplished something good. Promising to help out more when older and when I have more authority and resources, I feel like I am glowing with happiness and pride.

Journal #3

Deciding to walk to school the next day, I come across a wallet. Opening it, I wonder who it belongs to. In the front of the worn, brown, leather cover reads: 'If found please do not return. I am sure you need it more than me.' Confused about why this is said in the front, I decide I can use the money in it to help people downtown. Walking to school, I count the money concluding that there is $500 in it. Wondering who the owner of this worn wallet is, I ponder why anyone would in some instance, give away their money like that. Eventually getting to school, for the first time, I sit through class gazing at the clock wishing it to announce the end of school. Finally, the bell rings and I am, for once, one of the first people out. Briskly walking home, I get changed when I arrive and arrange for my chauffeur to take me into town. Once in town, we go on a shopping spree. With my income of $500, I spent it on:

$80 Basic Shelter x1

$15 Basic Clothes (1 set ) x4

$25 School Supplies x1

$45 Clean Water (1 year) x1

$10 Immunisation x3

$25 Vege Garden x2

$80 School for a year (2 years = Reading 3 years = Writing) x1

$30 Mums and Babies Health Care x1

$100 Medical/Dentist Care x1

That is called my expenditure (I learned that in my economics class). Next stop, Downtown. Driving downtown, I realise how bad it looks. Some of the shelters are worn down, their water is infested with mud and shared with the birds, and only half of them have ever been to a doctor or a dentist. I am glad that I found that wallet. After a long afternoon and evening of giving things to the community and planting vege gardens, I am exhausted and glad when my chauffeur drives me home. Giving those things to the poor people, I feel useful and fortunate to have a home and food in the morning, let alone education. When home, I flop on the couch and sleep.

economy

About the author

Eva

I am 13 and searching for some ways to earn money. I saw this cool website and have put in some effort to write money-making stories. Please Read! My stories are mostly written for school but some I have written for fun. All written in NZ.

Reader insights

Outstanding

Excellent work. Looking forward to reading more!

Top insights

  1. Compelling and original writing

    Creative use of language & vocab

  2. Excellent storytelling

    Original narrative & well developed characters

  3. Eye opening

    Niche topic & fresh perspectives

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