Why Creepypastas Are Important

The so-called scary stories of the internet have made an impact.

Why Creepypastas Are Important

If you've been on the internet for any amount of time, then you probably have heard of the Slenderman or Jeff the Killer. These iconic and yet lackluster creations of the internet's best attempt at horror have come from what the internet calls "Creepypastas," or the internet's scary stories.

Creepypastas have been around for a very long time, more than 10 years of history. 10 plus years of both great and horrible stories. 10 plus years of Slender Monsters and plenty of something or other the killers. And there's variety among it too. It all varies from "realistic" stories like what you can find on reddit's r/nosleep, or very out of this world like what you can find on creepypasta wiki or other websites. And if you like audio books, or something similar, then there are many youtubers who read these scary stories in a sinister narration. People like CreepsMcpasta, MrCreepyPasta, KingSpook, or CreepyPastaJr.

Where does the importance come in? Where do I explain why these scary stories are so important? It comes in where I believe it needs to be. The movie industry and its constant failure to make a good horror flick. Horrible movies like The Nun or Pet Sematary (2018) have proven that the horror genre is over saturated to the brim with uninspired, overused concepts that don't scare me or the six year old you babysit for extra dough. It's the same formula over and over again, plot holes, gorey killings, jump scares, the whole works.

Yet with Creepypastas—with the good ones at least—that's not an issue. Some of these stories are so chilling and fresh to the horror genre that hearing them or reading them make for a fun time, This is why I think that the movie industry needs to look at these stories that are fresh and new, and begin to make great horror films with them. Make horror scary again.

And yes, I know about the Slenderman movies, those are quite god awful. I believe those don't follow the example I was or am trying to make. They betrayed the formula of Slenderman. That's why they're awful. These stories have talented authors who know how to make a reader or viewer hooked. And I believe that instead of pumping out another horrid remake of a beloved horror movie, and proceeding to utterly butcher it, the movie industry should find these talented authors and offer them a movie contract, maybe the position of working alongside a talented director, or heck, even letting them be directors themselves!

The horror industry has lost its way with its movies, At least the ones shown in the common box office. We need to follow the example creepy pastas set, or horror as we know it will never live up the olden prime days of Jason Voorhees and Freddy Kreuger, those days in which people could say they were having nightmares about the cult classics, sometimes quite literally. Again, that's what these scary stories of the internet, that's what these creepy pastas offer. Genuine horror for the fan in us who gets tired of the constant failures of cinematic horror. Horror should send shivers down your spine, and make your heart feel queasy and uneasy. It shouldn't have me thinking about how many crappy mistakes I can find in the movie. It shouldn't annoy me to no end, because it follows every over played and overused technique. It should do what horror should, scare the ever living soul out of me and have myself become a kid again. It should make me think childish things like, "What if monsters are real?"

If you are interested in the creepy pastas I mentioned throughout this article, here are some links.

r/nosleep: reddit.com/r/nosleep/

KingSpook

CreepsMcPasta

MrCreepyPasta

CreepyPastaJr

urban legend
How does it work?
Read next: Run Necromancer
Jacob Harold

I'm a gamer and a poet who's got anger issues, sadness, and anxiety. To put it simply, I'm a volatile cocktail of a person. But stick around, I swear you'll think I'm an okay guy. profile pic downloaded from sound-dream on Tumblr.

See all posts by Jacob Harold