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Top 10 Best films on Netflix Right Now

by Onetechspot 2 months ago in list
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Top 10 Best films on Netflix Right Now

**Best films on Netflix**

Netflix’s vast amount of movies can make it difficult to find really great films there. To help you, we have selected the top films that are currently being streamed on the service in the United States and are updated regularly as titles come and go. And as a bonus, many of the articles below link to other great movies on Netflix.

**1) Ali | films**

Will Smith won his first Oscar nomination for his stunning role as Muhammad Ali in this powerful biography. Fortunately, “Ali” avoids the cradle approach to many such projects to focus on the important decade from 1964 to 1974, from talented young fighters. Skillfully adapts the transformation of the champion into a politician. Fighting in Vietnam will be the focus of the controversy over his conversion to Islam. Director Michael Mann is transforming the usual simple and meditative style into something more rustic and emotional.

**2) Moneyball | films**

It seems impossible to make an interesting movie adaptation of Michael Lewis’s dense non-fiction book about the crunch of baseball numbers-not to mention making something so airy and engaging. However, the script by Steven Zaillian and Aaron Sorkin strikes a good balance between egghead theory and character development, Bennett Miller’s direction is nimble rather than lightweight, and Brad Pitt’s restless charisma has rarely found a suitable presentation, support casts (including Jonah) Hill, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Robin Wright, Chris Pratt) are all-star teams.

**3) Titanic | films**

James Cameron’s adaptation, in which the Titanic sank in 1912, was an almost unparalleled commercial hit (a movie that recorded the highest box office revenue ever for over a decade) and an Oscar-winning movie. I hardly expected it to be the best movie. Most of his pre-release ads were about over-budgeting and over-planning.

However, when you think about it later, it was a kind of entertainment that was reminiscent of past blockbusters, skillfully combining historical drama, wide-screen adventure, and heartfelt romance. And leadcasts Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet offered the latter abundantly and became one of the great screen couples of the 1990s.

**4) Bright Star | films**

The free-spirited female who shared something of romance with the young poet John Keats in the last years of his life is at the heart of this drama by writer and director Jane Campion. Like her previous film “Piano,” Campion does not allow the historical background of the film to move away from the modern audience. She deals with larger issues and ideas anytime, anywhere, keeping her personality and conflicts universal and accessible. As a result, her film has more life and power than your typical monotonous literary biography-it’s smart, charming and sexy.

**5) Magnolia | films**

Paul Thomas Anderson appeared on the scene in “Boogie Nights”. His fiery, energetic and old Manesque tapestry was in the corner of the San Fernando Valley sowing circa 1977, but the filmmakers broke, rich and long (more than three hours) on one special day. A sad and often painfully entertaining story of some interlocking lives. With opera-like emotions and ambitions, this is Anderson’s most chaotic piece, but one of his best.

**6) My Fair Lady | films**

George Cukor’s energetic adaptation of the Broadway musical is an astonishing eight Academy Awards, including Best Work Award, Best Director Award, and Best Actor Award. Audrey Hepburn is a low-ranking Cockney flower girl Eliza Doolittle who believes that phonetics professor Henry Higgins can only make a real female by refining her language. Alan Jay Lerner’s intelligent script carefully navigates gender and class while creating a reliable “opposite” chemistry during the main cast.

**7) Middle of Nowhere | films**

Ava DuVernay won the 2012 Sundance Film Festival Directors Award for this delicate, thoughtful and inspiring drama. Our reviewer, Manora Dargis, talks about her husband, a young nurse, Ruby (Emayazi Corinaldi), ignoring the stereotypes and assumptions of many other films. She wants you to see her character and really see it. Ruby visits her faithfully and keeps a candle in her house, but when her lovely bus driver approaches her, she decides on her and she Begins to question his loyalty. Corinaldi is a wonderful being who plays a role of empathy and complexity, and the terrifying charisma of Eurowo, who reunites with Duverney for “Selma”, makes her dilemma even more difficult.

**8) Blade Runner | films**

Philip K. Dick’s “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?” Combining this stylish and influential adaptive film noir, dystopian sci-fi, action-adventure convention with stunning care. His Los Angeles portrait around 2019 is particularly noticeable, smooth and corrupt. Neon-lit, rain-soaked urban landscapes are the ideal environment for Harrison Ford’s stubborn and futuristic rubber shoes. And while it’s not just a visual and audio show, the thoughtful quest for Dick’s humanity, memory, and empathy remains, Ridley Scott offers a genre of merchandise that includes a final chase and shootout.

**9) Burning Cane | films**

The short run time of Philippe Euman’s “unforgettable” debut movie is, in a sense, a graceful act. It’s a story of such devastation and melancholy, a story of so many lives in various states of need and despair, and long diggings can be longer than some viewers can tolerate. But the “burning wand” is somehow not a depressing experience. His film making was very exciting, his performance was very moving, his sense of time and place was so deep that the old Bruce inspired the 2019 film writer and director Youmans.

The image vibrates like a record. The fact that he was a teenager at the time makes his work even more impressive. It has a kind of wealth and wisdom that some filmmakers accumulate throughout their lives.

**10) The Power of the Dog | films**

“Which lady made this?” Phil asks about the paper flowers of Peter. This is the first clue to an adaptation of Thomas Savage’s novel, the original subject of Jane Campion’s new film. Phil does a lot of work, and when his brother and ranch partner George marries Peter’s mother Rose, Phil’s resentment and malice surface. Attempted to maintain his dominance on multiple hostile paths. Shows dissatisfaction. That tension and conflict is sufficient for a minor filmmaker, but Campion delves deeper and explores his complex subject matter in a carefully crafted order-and welcome complexity and unexpected in this film.

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