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Mortal Kombat Legends: Scorpion’s Revenge Review

by Joseph Adjei 10 months ago in review

"A new perspective of the ever-stylish Mortal Kombat story"

Mortal Kombat Legends: Scorpion’s Revenge Review

Mortal Kombat Legends: Scorpion’s Revenge Review Mortal Kombat Legends: Scorpion’s Revenge delivers a fully new perspective of the ever-stylish Mortal Kombat story by creating Scorpion’s arc the foremost narrative.

The film starts off showcasing the tragedy that created the hellfire kombatant Scorpion we tend to all or any recognise and love, the animated flick is packed with an ultra-violent and irreverent charm that created Mortal Kombat the favoured violent genre from of those years.

The film starts by showing the human aspect of Scorpion, Hanzo Hasashi voiced by Patrick Sietz, and so the tragic reason that he desires revenge, the film encompasses a dangling likeness to the X-Men Origins: Wolverine wherever Scorpion transforms into a killing machine that pulverises anything or anyone that gets into his path. It's robust to support a person that doesn't have or bear weakness or character flaws; however, he’s there to portray the kick-ass character who puts spears through faces time when time after to produce results.

The biggest problem of the movie is that tries to try and do epic Mortal Kombat tournament arc on top of the Scorpion story, the film doesn't go more in-depth of the protagonist, half of the films becomes rapid series of fight scenes, cameos and questionable plot twists.

Mortal Kombat Legends: Scorpion’s Revenge Review Mortal Kombat Legends: Scorpion’s Revenge delivers a fully new perspective of the ever-stylish Mortal Kombat story by creating Scorpion’s arc the foremost narrative.

The film starts off showcasing the tragedy that created the hellfire kombatant Scorpion we tend to all or any recognise and love, the animated flick is packed with an ultra-violent and irreverent charm that created Mortal Kombat the favoured violent genre from of those years.

The film starts by showing the human aspect of Scorpion, Hanzo Hasashi voiced by Patrick Sietz, and so the tragic reason that he desires revenge, the film encompasses a dangling likeness to the X-Men Origins: Wolverine wherever Scorpion transforms into a killing machine that pulverises anything or anyone that gets into his path. It's robust to support a person that doesn't have or bear weakness or character flaws; however, he’s there to portray the kick-ass character who puts spears through faces time when time after to produce results.

The biggest problem of the movie is that tries to try and do epic Mortal Kombat tournament arc on top of the Scorpion story, the film doesn't go more in-depth of the protagonist, half of the films becomes rapid series of fight scenes, cameos and questionable plot twists.

Besides the fights being the most attraction of the film its still great watch, filled with an energetic, stylish, excessive amount of blood, guts and brains. Jonny Cage voiced by Joel McHale provides the key ingredient for seal-aware humour, his comedy “Romance” with Sonya Blade voiced by Jennifer Carpenter. because the film reaches its ending, there are developments of serious cliffhangers and teases for the subsequent sequel, unfortunately, most the plots were thrown out the window leaving an unsatisfying fashion, feeling more sort of a TV show besides a movie plot.

Verdict

Mortal Kombat Legends: Scorpion’s Revenge does deliver when it comes the to franchise staples with gory martial arts action and a sense of humour but that's about it and offers nothing else. Scorpion is that the main character but the film doesn't go all get in his story instead the films don't find anything interesting or meaningful about him. The movie contains a promising idea to revisit the initial Mortal Kombat story from Scorpion perspective, but in execution, it appears like a serious missed opportunity to capitalise on the given opportunity to go in-depth on the story.

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Joseph Adjei
Joseph Adjei
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