science

Topics and developments in science and medicine, presented by Futurism.

  • Alan Kotok
    Published 3 years ago
    A Thinking Person's Artificial Intelligence

    A Thinking Person's Artificial Intelligence

    Over the past decade, artificial intelligence migrated from computer geeks' workshops to something many people encounter in their everyday lives, but not without fears of its effects. Last year, the Pew Research Center assembled a panel of more than 1,300 experts, polled on the impact of increasing our reliance on algorithms—mathematical models underpinning artificial intelligence that aid in making decisions and completing tasks—and whose responses were boiled down into a set of themes.
  • Casey Parker
    Published 3 years ago
    Sinister Dexterity (Or, Let's Get Sinister)

    Sinister Dexterity (Or, Let's Get Sinister)

    You've been using your right hand all your life. Well, with the exception of the ten percent this whole article is backward for. Next time you do something you've grown to consider a single-command operation, try using the hand that isn't the one that wants to do it. Open doors, tie your shoes, write, all with one hand and not the expected one. Let's get into why.
  • Thamarasee Jeewandara
    Published 3 years ago
    The Dawn of Microbots and Nanorobots

    The Dawn of Microbots and Nanorobots

    Creating nano and micro-scale robots to assist biomedical interventions in humans is a relatively young research field receiving copious amounts of interest within scientific research and Sci-Fi.
  • Anya Wassenberg
    Published 3 years ago
    Solar Eclipse 2017

    Solar Eclipse 2017

    Solar eclipse 2017—are you ready for it? On August 21, 2017, for the first time in 99 years, a total eclipse of the sun will pass across the entire continental United States.
  • Rob Salkowitz
    Published 3 years ago
    Can Better Data Head Off Environmental Disasters?

    Can Better Data Head Off Environmental Disasters?

    Do you live within 200 yards of an oil or gas pipe? More than 60% of Americans do, but no one—not public agencies, not commercial customers, and not even the energy companies that own the pipes—could tell you exactly where defects in those pipes are. As that infrastructure ages far beyond its intended lifespan, the costs of maintaining and servicing pipelines pose a $68 billion headache for the industry and a ticking time bomb for the public.
  • The Latest Bio-Engineering Heart Transplant Research Is In: Spinach Leaves

    The Latest Bio-Engineering Heart Transplant Research Is In: Spinach Leaves

    I don't know whether to be blown away or skeptical, but the information and research are indeed verified. It turns out that the research as written here has proven scientists can now literally simulate a human heart—with spinach leaves. Huh. Who knew?
  • Janice Simms
    Published 3 years ago
    Are We Close to a Real Medical Tricorder?
  • Nadia Davidson
    Published 3 years ago
    Science Fiction: Science as Craft

    Science Fiction: Science as Craft

    Writing is a craft. We talk of crafting a story, and of wordsmiths who forge metaphors from the white heat of their imaginations. The creation of fiction, therefore, involves a process akin to that of making art. This process involves the mind constructing a fabrication which will more clearly define our reality, or even go beyond our understanding of what reality is.
  • Christine Alford
    Published 3 years ago
    Sir Hans Sloane, Magic Mirrors and the British Museum

    Sir Hans Sloane, Magic Mirrors and the British Museum

    The British Museum collection began with the intellectual curiosity of an Irish doctor called Sir Hans Sloane. He began collecting when he was working in Jamaica, as a physician to the governor. He returned to London in 1689 and continued collecting. He was a very wealthy and successful doctor. His patients included the diarist Samuel Pepys and Queen Anne. Soon his house in Bloomsbury Place was overflowing with ‘plants, fossils, minerals, zoological, anatomical and pathological specimens, antiquities …prints, drawings and coins, books and manuscripts.’ His collecting got so out of control that he had to buy the house next door. When that house was full he moved to a new house in Chelsea!
  • Anya Wassenberg
    Published 3 years ago
    Exoplanet Update: NASA Releases New Kepler Data

    Exoplanet Update: NASA Releases New Kepler Data

    NASA released the latest data from the Kepler space telescope project. A total of 219 objects were identified as new planet candidates. More significantly, 10 of those were determined to be possible Earth-like exoplanets which orbit their star at a distance called the habitable zone, where water could exist in a liquid state.
  • Alva v.Harzi
    Published 3 years ago
    The Inner Realm

    The Inner Realm

    “The law of attraction works universally on every plane of action, and we attract whatever we desire or expect. If we desire one thing and expect another, we become like houses divided against themselves, which are quickly brought to desolation. Determine resolutely to expect only what you desire, then you will attract only what you wish for.”- Ralph Trine.
  • Iris Sinclair
    Published 3 years ago
    Killing Clones

    Killing Clones

    For a heart-stopping second, I feel my foot slip and I stumble dangerously close to the cliff's edge. I turn just fast enough to see the knife flying towards my face and I dodge it as best as I can. It misses my vital features but still cuts deeply into the flesh of my cheek before clattering to the ground. I feel warm blood dripping down my chin.