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‘Covid’ Ops: Whether the weather is part of a strategy

Lasers and wave blasts as manipulation methods

‘Covid’ Ops: Whether the weather is part of a strategy

I don’t know about anyone else, but to me it seems as if someone switched a button somewhere at the start of 2020 that began to turn the world upside down.

First there was the threat of a pandemic, then countries were forced into lockdown and economies sent crashing to the brink of collapse. This was followed by hundreds of satellites being sent up into space and even the weather began to operate in very mysterious ways.

And, with a plethora of alien and other bizarre documentaries flooding the airwaves during our enforced confinement, I’m now looking at the world in an entirely different way than I was just six months ago.

As lockdown began to be lifted in the UK last month there was some marvelous weather that threatened to throw the mandate of social-distancing out of the window, now in July the grey clouds don’t seem to want to go away and the winds around our shores are unusually gusty for this time of year.

Could this all be a result of global warming? Or are there other, more technological forces, at play... influencing weather patterns in some Machiavellian way?

With talk of covert military projects, adopting microwave pulses and laser rays, being financed to experiment on climatic manipulation, could this be another bizarre twist to our world in 2020? Concerns have surfaced in the past about technology being used to control our weather as a form of economic warfare, but since they first surfaced the science has come a long way.

During the Vietnam War, a top-secret project called Operation Popeye was used by the United States to disrupt Vietnamese military supplies by increasing rainfall in the Laotian region through cloud seeding.

Operation Popeye was a military operation carried out by the US Air Force from 1967-72 that attempted to extend the monsoon season over specific areas of the Ho Chi Minh Trail to disrupt North Vietnamese military supplies through cloud seeding to soften road surfaces and cause landslides.

Former US Secretary of Defence Robert S McNamara was aware the international scientific community might have objections to it but said in a memo to the president that such objections had not in the past been a basis for prevention of military activities considered to be in the interests of US national security.

The weather modification programme was conducted from Thailand over Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam… allegedly sponsored by then Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and the CIA, without the authorisation of another former Secretary of Defence Melvin Laird, who categorically denied to Congress that such chemical modification of the weather was being used as a tactical weapon.

Since these revelations came to light, there has been an international ban against weaponising the weather under the Environmental Modification Convention... but when it comes to national or international financial interests we all know that “agreements” can be broken.

In the modern world cloud seeding is old-hat technology, the state-of-the-art stuff is microwave blasts and laser beams. But the colossal size of weather fronts means any effective modification system would require co-operation, or “deception”, on a global scale, with the danger of mitigating storms in one region resulting in storms being created elsewhere.

But the science now exists to be able to induce rain and lightning storms using high-energy lasers as a result of breakthrough technology that could potentially eradicate droughts throughout the globe or be used in far more sinister ways.

Experts from the University of Central Florida and the University of Arizona believe that by firing a series of laser beams, they can activate static electricity and induce rain and storms.

Laser beams can travel vast distances but “when a laser beam becomes intense enough, it behaves differently than usual – it collapses inward on itself” said Matthew Mills, a graduate student in the Center for Research and Education in Optics and Lasers (CREOL).

“The collapse becomes so intense that electrons in the air’s oxygen and nitrogen are ripped off creating plasma – basically a soup of electrons,” he said, adding that on reaching that point the laser tries to spread the beam out and eventually collapses in on itself.

This struggle is known as “filamentation” and creates a “light string” that only lasts for a short time before it disperses.

“Because a filament creates excited electrons in its wake as it moves, it artificially seeds the conditions necessary for rain and lightning to occur,” Mills said. “Since we have control over the length of a filament with our method, one could seed the conditions needed for a rainstorm from afar. Ultimately, you could artificially control the rain and lightning over a large expanse with such ideas.”

Such theories are now widely recognised in the scientific community, with the University of Geneva’s Jean-Pierre Wolf acknowledging: “This is a new method based on ultra-fast, ultra-short laser pulses, which generate intense lasers that are low-energy as the pulse is very short.”

However, Wolf notes, the concept has its drawbacks: “There is a problem of scaling, such as creating a cumulous cloud, which is a kilometre long and spans over tens of kilometres. Then the question is whether it makes sense in terms of the energy you put into the system.”

These lasers would need to be housed on satellites, which would also have to be equipped with the ability to monitor the weather and position themselves in orbit to be able to manipulate it.

But OHB Systems AG chief operating officer Andreas Lindenthal says: “People are putting research into very efficient lasers that can be put into orbit. For me, it’s only a matter of time.”

More than 100 years ago ground-breaking scientist Nikola Tesla had drawn up plans for a “cosmic ray” and was convinced his ideas on “terrestrial stationary waves” would transform the supply of electricity, so is it possible his plans are now being developed to influence the weather?

Given that the world’s “industrial-military complex” confiscated Tesla’s papers and laboratory notes following his death in 1943, is it so hard to imagine that further “secret research” over the last 70 years has seen Tesla’s ideas come to fruition?

Tesla’s greatest innovation was his wireless terrestrial-stationary wave research, which he believed would transform communication and electricity provision throughout the world... until his backers realised it would mean power that was virtually free to anyone adopting it.

His research was a forerunner to the wireless technology that runs the internet and mobile phones we now take for granted, but it also has more far-reaching applications such as weather manipulation by way of high-frequency radio waves.

Interestingly this science formed the core of the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) initiated as an ionospheric research study jointly funded by the US Air Force, the US Navy, the University of Alaska Fairbanks and the Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) that originally began in 1993.

The site was designed and built by BAE Advanced Technologies, with its original purpose stated as being to analyse the ionosphere and investigate the potential for developing ionospheric enhancement technology for radio communications and surveillance.

The most prominent instrument at HAARP is the Ionospheric Research Instrument (IRI), a high-power radio frequency transmitter facility operating in the high-frequency (HF) band that can be used to temporarily excite a limited area of the ionosphere.

Other instruments, such as a VHF and a UHF radar, a fluxgate magnetometer, a digisonde (an ionospheric sounding device), and an induction magnetometer, are used to study the physical processes that occur in the excited region.

The current working IRI was completed in 2007 by BAE Systems Advanced Technologies and by 2008 the HAARP project had incurred around US$250 million in tax-funded construction and operating costs.

In May 2014, it was announced the programme would be permanently wound up and, after discussions between the parties, ownership of the facility and its equipment was transferred in August 2015 to the University of Alaska Fairbanks, which now runs it.

And while the US Air Force and DARPA would like everyone to believe they have stopped using HAARP for research, they still have access to other technology in the form of radar communication and surveillance systems on top of mobile rigs that are deployable in any international waters around the world.

All they need to do is twist a knob to change the frequency of the main wave to the microwave range for a modulated frequency (FM) broadcast, and increase the transmission power high enough to reach and heat up the atmosphere above the designated target, technology that is covered under US Patent 4,686,605 on the “Method and Apparatus for Altering a Region in the Earth’s Atmosphere, Ionosphere, and/or Magnetosphere”. The technology could quite easily be deployed from a satellite roaming around in low-earth orbit as well.

The science is similar to a microwave, the only difference being that it is cooking up the sky as opposed to breakfast, with the voltage needed to transmit the same microwave frequency signal being far greater… in the range of hundreds of millions of volts due to the distance the signal would need to travel between the antenna and the target.

However an increase of just one degree Celsius in the atmospheric temperature is more than enough to initiate a significant weather event. By heating up at least three specific locations in the atmosphere, the common centre region having a relatively lower pressure than those three heated points would become the eye of the storm.

It sounds far-fetched, but it is actually proven science that the industrial-military complex may well now be able to effectively deploy. But on a more worrying note, this is probably only the tip of the iceberg in terms of what this technology is capable of!

fact or fiction
Steve Harrison
Steve Harrison
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