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The Authentic and Legitimate Book of Fairy Life and Culture

by Walter Rhein 11 months ago in children
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Love is the sum of the memories we make together

Image by Walter Rhein

My little girls have always been crazy about fairies.

Once, driving home, the light of the setting sun reflected on some dust motes floating in the car. “Look,” I said, “fairies!”

“What!” my daughters cried, more excited than I’d ever seen them. I had to stop the car so we could watch the fairies dance and play until the sun settled down beyond the horizon.

As the years have passed, they haven’t grown out of their fairy fixation. In fact, they’re even more dedicated to fairies now than they have ever been before.

When they learned about the tooth fairy, they couldn’t contain themselves.

“You mean, an actual fairy is coming to our house?” they asked.

“Yes,” I said.

Naturally, it was a huge event when my eldest daughter, Sienna, lost her first tooth. She wasn’t content to simply put her tooth beneath her pillow. Instead, she set out cookies and wrote a long letter asking the fairy all sorts of questions about the fairy world.

“I’ve never heard of anyone doing that,” I said.

“But daddy,” Sienna said, “why should I be able to write a letter to Santa and not the tooth fairy?”

Her logic was irrefutable.

That night the tooth fairy came and left a stash of quarters along with a lovely drawing and magical answers written in a beautiful and artistic script.

The girls were enchanted.

They asked the tooth fairy if she had any brothers and sisters. They asked if she had been the same tooth fairy that visited dad and mom when they were little. They asked what tooth fairies ate, what they played and where they lived.

Again and again, the tooth fairy answered.

All of the letters were neatly kept and stored away. They were precious, magical documents that contained the truth about the fairy world written by an actual fairy.

“Daddy,” they said, “will you collect these stories together?”

“Of course!” I replied.

They gave me a refresher course on everything they knew about fairies. They made sure I was up to date on all the legitimate tooth fairy knowledge.

“There are spring fairies daddy,” Sienna said.

“And summer fairies,” said my younger daughter, Avril.

“And winter fairies,” Sienna said.

“How about if we wrote a story about a winter fairy who was raised by the summer fairies and didn’t really understand her place in the world?”

The girls clapped their hands. They looked something like fairies themselves.

“The story has to have a mermaid,” Sienna said.

“And a centaur,” Avril insisted.

“Okay, okay, okay!”

As much as we knew about fairies, we discovered even more. In the story, the winter fairy’s name is Cosette. Whenever there is a question about how things must really be in the fairy kingdom, the girls save it to ask the next time they lose a tooth.

Every night as they get ready for bed, the girls run up to me and say, “Daddy, did you write Cosette?”

“Yes.”

“How many pages?”

“Three.”

“But daddy, last night you wrote six pages!”

“Well, these are important pages.”

It turns out that there are fairies for the seasons, and fairies for the weather, and fairies for almost anything you can imagine. The world is quite literally overflowing with fairies. My daughters sat down and began making detailed sketches of all the different fairies in the world.

On the backs of the drawings, they make a list of the fairy's special abilities.

The rain fairy always cries.

The ice fairy always has a hard expression.

Every time they discover something new about the fairy world, it makes its way into the fairy book.

Every night I read them a new chapter written for them, then we put the pages in a binder and store it under their bed.

“Is it neat to know you have a book in your room that nobody else in the world has read?”

They like that, but they also want to share the story with the world. They consider it important knowledge that everyone needs to know.

Sharing the adventure of the fairies with my children has been the greatest privilege of my life. It’s by far my favorite bedtime story. Nothing else is even close.

children

About the author

Walter Rhein

I'm a small press novelist. Shoot me an email if you want to discuss writing in any capacity, or head over to my web page www.streetsoflima.com. [email protected]

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