Why The Arts Are Important

by Rachel Ihasz 2 years ago in student

A General Look at the Opportunities and Guidelines the Arts Give Us

Why The Arts Are Important

Art is a form of expression.

Bottom line, that's what art is.

And without expression, one cannot formulate any sense of emotions. Art allows me, among many, many others, the opportunity to broadcast who I am as well as what I believe in. Theater has made a significant impact on society and the way we see things.

Theater sometimes pokes fun at stereotypes or brings light to a particular controversial subject in our generation, which generates attention for those subjects and possibly sparks conversation about it. That's very important, don't you think?

Regardless of the good impacts theatre has on society, it also provides an escape for people in the business. For example, the theatre has always been a place where I can alleviate some of my stress, anxiety, and the pressures of school; I can become someone else. Theater enables me to step into someone else’s shoes and understand their issues.

In college, you get the opportunity to try a variety of different roles. You get to understand how each character thinks whether they are fifteen or forty. Playwrights write about family dynamics, abusive relationships, even suicide. And while this might be on the serious spectrum of things, it's true and they are important to know about and understand.

Modern psychology has suggested that playwrights take normal, nothing-out-of-the-ordinary lives and enhance them with some energy that miraculously creates dynamic lives that cause a great story to be told. In reality, playwrights just take a normal family and describe the hardships that they through each day between their actions and thoughts. They write stories based on real life things. A successful play, is a relatable play. If you can watch something and it makes you emotional or angry because you know what that actor is going through, it's relatable and you're more inclined to like it. Movies do that same thing. You see the main female character crying because she saw her boyfriend sleeping with another girl when he said he was at home studying. She's crying, you're crying. You feel for her, because you've been through it. It's all a cycle.

On the education side of the spectrum, the arts are necessary because they teach people to be prepared and committed, as one needs to be with any job they receive. The elements that are learned in rehearsals are the techniques that can guide someone inside a classroom setting and out in the real world.

Some people find musicals very irritating. To this, I disagree, for the musical division of theater allows its people to understand a wide range of artistic abilities such as reading music, analyzing interpretations of music, and conveying the piece in the way the composer envisions.

As a student, this is a great skill to learn. It's just another knack to pick up quickly. Even if you don't use it, its something to put on your resume! Who knows when it will come in handy. The world works in mysterious ways.

Creativity, you say? Theatre is full of it. Theatre is a boundless as air. Anything it possible. Theatre has no limitations for what can be done. If you can imagine it, it can happen. Theatre let's the creative juices flow into a big masterpiece full of song and dance and bright lights! That is so important to me as a student. Younger minds are going a mile a minute, or at least, mine is. It is vital to get ideas on paper and make them reality. And that it precisely what theatre does.

Overall, theater is enjoyable, inspirational, and an ongoing learning process. Whether it is about the era of time or the motivations of a character, theatre never ceases to amaze me. The arts, both visual and performing, are part of our humanity. And what would humanity be without a glorious five-part harmony and a two minute long dance break?

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Rachel Ihasz

Wandering thoughts don't keep me up at night, they keep my journals full of adventure

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