Earth logo

Why is there a lot of static electricity in winter? If you know the principle, you can easily avoid being electrocuted!

by Orr Hirshman 2 months ago in Science
Report Story

The principle of more static electricity in winter

There are four seasons of the year, spring, summer, autumn, and winter. Each season has its unique beauty. In spring the gardens are full of flowers, in summer the ponds are full of lotus flowers, in autumn the trees are full of leaves and in winter it is a world of snowflakes. Everyone has their favorite seasons and dislikes too. There are countless reasons to like them, and only one to dislike them. Spring is humid, summer is hot, autumn is dry and winter is cold. But when it comes to disliking winter, there is probably another reason. Because every winter, we all become static mages who hurt each other almost all the time.

When do you become a static image? It's when you take off your jumper accompanied by a crackling sound and flashing blue lightning; it's when you reach out to touch someone and suddenly get pulled back by electricity; or even when other objects are conducting electricity and suddenly get pulled back plus one. Becoming a static mage should have started in autumn, it just occurs more frequently in winter. Also, it is too cold in winter to reach out easily. Who wouldn't be moved to stretch out their hand and suffer flesh and blood?

To explore where static electricity comes from, we also need to talk about the composition of the matter: atoms. Everything in the world is made up of atoms, which in turn are made up of positively charged protons, negatively charged electrons, and neutral, uncharged neutrons. A complete atom is uncharged because the positive and negative charges are the same amount and exactly cancel each other out. The electrons are suspended outside the nucleus, which is made up of protons and neutrons, and constantly surround them. This loose connection leads to the problem that the outer electrons are easily separated from the atom as a whole. The atom is then separated into a positively charged nucleus and a negatively charged electron. At this point, it is no longer neutral, but two charged particles.

The resulting phenomenon is frictional electrification. By friction, a large number of atoms can be separated and a large number of positive and negative charges can be generated. But friction is a way of generating heat energy. In addition to thermal energy, chemical, kinetic and potential energy are all possible. This is because the separation of atoms requires energy. Friction-generated electricity is easier to achieve with insulating materials, and the better the insulation, the better the separation of atoms.

Now we come back to electrostatics. Electrostatic forces are electrostatic charges or immobile charges. That is when the nucleus and electrons of an atom separate at various energies, and the atom become electrostatic. When static electricity is "in motion", an electric current is formed. So static electricity is already present in our lives (e.g. clothes, hands). It is drawn out by our touch, causing harm to us and being seen by us.

Accordingly, static electricity is generated all the time, but why is it only triggered easily in the autumn and winter months? Think back to the conditions we mentioned earlier. Insulating materials that flow to generate electricity. The first is to enrich the static electricity in large quantities and the second is to make it "move". Then, before the electrostatic enrichment is met, the various conductive elements have to be removed. One major difference between spring and summer and autumn and winter is the humidity. Don't underestimate humidity. With a little moisture, static electricity is conducted away and does not collect.

That's why dryness is the main reason why we become static masters in autumn and winter. Every move we make generates static electricity, but because the weather is so dry, it stays on the appropriate object because there is no water to direct it on various insulating objects. When one touches it, it drives the flow of static electricity and thus creates an electric current.

As to why it hurts to be electrocuted, it is because of the instant high voltage discharge. The static electricity on the human body can reach thousands or even tens of thousands of volts. But we don't have to worry that such high voltages will cause us more harm. Because the discharge is so short, measured in nanoseconds, the pain is only for a moment and then it's gone.

Don't be afraid of static electricity in winter, we can still use various methods to prevent it from harming us. There are two main ways, the first of which is to reduce static electricity. We say the more insulated you are, the easier it is to wear some cotton, linen, or silk clothes. Wear less chemical fiber clothes, that is, those made of chemical fabrics, such as polyester and acrylic. You can also keep yourself from getting too dry, for example by applying hand creams and face creams.

Secondly, discharge static electricity first. Before touching the metal (e.g. door handle), touch it with the tip of the key. Let the static electricity pass between the metal and the key, and the hand will not be charged if you touch it again. And the key itself will not drive too much static electricity, so don't be afraid of being charged by the key. At most, your hands will freeze. If you don't have a key, other small metals will work. If not, try not to touch the metal directly with your hands. Use your clothes to keep them out of the way, but there is still the possibility of electrocution, so be prepared.

So the solution is sometimes simple. As long as you know the principle, you can find a solution based on it, and you can even learn from one example. Especially if you can't find a common item, you can find a substitute as soon as possible. Or think of other solutions. Every little thing in life deserves our attention. If we do a little bit better, we could pave the way for something bigger!

I think it's a summary of the main points:

1. Everything in the world is made up of atoms, which in turn are made up of positively charged protons, negatively charged electrons, and neutral uncharged neutrons. A complete atom is uncharged because the positive and negative charges are the same and exactly cancel each other out.

2. The separation of nuclei and electrons in an atom due to various energies results in electrostatic charges

3. Static electricity is an electrostatic charge or immobile charge.

4. Static electricity is generated by our every move, but because the weather is so dry, it can be directed on various insulating objects without moisture and so stays on the appropriate object. When one touches it, it drives the flow of static electricity and thus creates an electric current.

5. You can be electrocuted by an instant high voltage discharge. Static electricity on the human body can reach several thousand volts or even tens of thousands of volts. Because the discharge time is very short, measured in nanoseconds, there is no need to worry that such a high voltage will cause us more harm.

6. There are still various ways in which we can avoid the hazards of static electricity. There are two main ways, the first is to reduce static electricity. The second is to discharge static electricity in the first place. There are four seasons in a year, spring, summer, autumn, and winter. Each season has its unique beauty. Spring gardens are full of flowers, summer ponds are full of lotus flowers, autumn leaves are everywhere, and winter is a world of snowflakes. Everyone has their favorite seasons and dislikes too. There are countless reasons to like them, and only one to dislike them. Spring is humid, summer is hot, autumn is dry and winter is cold. But when it comes to disliking winter, there is probably another reason. Because every winter, we all become static mages who hurt each other almost all the time.

When do you become a static mage? It's when you take off your jumper accompanied by a crackling sound and flashing blue lightning; it's when you reach out to touch someone and suddenly get pulled back by electricity; or even when other objects are conducting electricity and suddenly get pulled back plus one. Becoming a static mage should have started in autumn, it just occurs more frequently in winter. Also, it is too cold in winter to reach out easily. Who wouldn't be moved to stretch out their hand and suffer flesh and blood?

To explore where static electricity comes from, we also need to talk about the composition of the matter: atoms. Everything in the world is made up of atoms, which in turn are made up of positively charged protons, negatively charged electrons, and neutral, uncharged neutrons. A complete atom is uncharged because the positive and negative charges are the same amount and exactly cancel each other out. The electrons are suspended outside the nucleus, which is made up of protons and neutrons, and constantly surround them. This loose connection leads to the problem that the outer electrons are easily separated from the atom as a whole. The atom is then separated into a positively charged nucleus and a negatively charged electron. At this point, it is no longer neutral, but two charged particles.

The resulting phenomenon is frictional electrification. By friction, a large number of atoms can be separated and a large number of positive and negative charges can be generated. But friction is a way of generating heat energy. In addition to thermal energy, chemical, kinetic and potential energy are all possible. This is because the separation of atoms requires energy. Friction-generated electricity is easier to achieve with insulating materials, and the better the insulation, the better the separation of atoms.

Now we come back to electrostatics. Electrostatic forces are electrostatic charges or immobile charges. That is when the nucleus and electrons of an atom separate at various energies, and the atom become electrostatic. When static electricity is "in motion", an electric current is formed. So static electricity is already present in our lives (e.g. clothes, hands). It is drawn out by our touch, causing harm to us and being seen by us.

Accordingly, static electricity is generated all the time, but why is it only triggered easily in the autumn and winter months? Think back to the conditions we mentioned earlier. Insulating materials that flow to generate electricity. The first is to enrich the static electricity in large quantities and the second is to make it "move". Then, before the electrostatic enrichment is met, the various conductive elements have to be removed. One major difference between spring and summer and autumn and winter is the humidity. Don't underestimate humidity. With a little moisture, static electricity is conducted away and does not collect.

That's why dryness is the main reason why we become static masters in autumn and winter. Every move we make generates static electricity, but because the weather is so dry, it stays on the appropriate object because there is no water to direct it on various insulating objects. When one touches it, it drives the flow of static electricity and thus creates an electric current.

As to why it hurts to be electrocuted, it is because of the instant high voltage discharge. The static electricity on the human body can reach thousands or even tens of thousands of volts. But we don't have to worry that such high voltages will cause us more harm. Because the discharge is so short, measured in nanoseconds, the pain is only for a moment and then it's gone.

Don't be afraid of static electricity in winter, we can still use various methods to prevent it from harming us. There are two main ways, the first of which is to reduce static electricity. We say the more insulated you are, the easier it is to wear some cotton, linen, or silk clothes. Wear less chemical fiber clothes, that is, those made of chemical fabrics, such as polyester and acrylic. You can also keep yourself from getting too dry, for example by applying hand creams and face creams.

Secondly, discharge static electricity first. Before touching the metal (e.g. door handle), touch it with the tip of the key. Let the static electricity pass between the metal and the key, and the hand will not be charged if you touch it again. And the key itself will not drive too much static electricity, so don't be afraid of being charged by the key. At most, your hands will freeze. If you don't have a key, other small metals will work. If not, try not to touch the metal directly with your hands. Use your clothes to keep them out of the way, but there is still the possibility of electrocution, so be prepared.

So the solution is sometimes simple. As long as you know the principle, you can find a solution based on it, and you can even learn from one example. Especially if you can't find a common item, you can find a substitute as soon as possible. Or think of other solutions. Every little thing in life deserves our attention. If we do a little bit better, we could pave the way for something bigger!

I think it's a summary of the main points:

1. Everything in the world is made up of atoms, which in turn are made up of positively charged protons, negatively charged electrons, and neutral uncharged neutrons. A complete atom is uncharged because the positive and negative charges are the same and exactly cancel each other out.

2. Atoms generate static electricity by the separation of nuclei and electrons due to various energies.

3. Static electricity is an electrostatic charge or immobile charge.

4. Static electricity is generated by our every move, but because the weather is so dry, it can be directed on various insulating objects without moisture and so stays on the appropriate object. When one touches it, it drives the flow of static electricity and thus creates an electric current.

5. You can be electrocuted by an instant high voltage discharge. Static electricity on the human body can reach several thousand volts or even tens of thousands of volts. Because the discharge time is very short, measured in nanoseconds, there is no need to worry that such a high voltage will cause us more harm.

6. There are still various ways in which we can avoid the hazards of static electricity. There are two main ways, the first is to reduce static electricity. The second is to discharge the static electricity first。

Science

About the author

Orr Hirshman

Reader insights

Be the first to share your insights about this piece.

How does it work?

Add your insights

Comments

There are no comments for this story

Be the first to respond and start the conversation.

Sign in to comment

    Find us on social media

    Miscellaneous links

    • Explore
    • Contact
    • Privacy Policy
    • Terms of Use
    • Support

    © 2022 Creatd, Inc. All Rights Reserved.