history

Key historic events throughout the ages in relation to business, work, corporate figures and moguls.

  • Ruth Elizabeth Stiff
    Published 28 days ago
    THE VICTORIAN WORKHOUSE

    THE VICTORIAN WORKHOUSE

    The “Workhouse” was designed to provide work and shelter for the extremely poor who could not support themselves. Over time, however, these workhouses became ‘prison systems’ who ‘dealt’ with the same poor. This harsh system first came to light during the Victorian Era. The “Institution” became known for its terrible conditions --- forced child labour / long hours / malnutrition / beatings and neglect.
  • Ruth Elizabeth Stiff
    Published about a month ago
    Servants in the Edwardian Era

    Servants in the Edwardian Era

    TRUE STORIES OF THOSE WHO WERE IN DOMESTIC SERVICE
  • Chelsi Ved
    Published about a month ago
    THE HISTORY OF TRACTORS IN INDIA
  • Jonathan Goodman
    Published about a month ago
    The Sinking Of The Brother Jonathan
  • Ruth Elizabeth Stiff
    Published about a month ago
    SERVANTS IN THE EDWARDIAN ERA

    SERVANTS IN THE EDWARDIAN ERA

    Many of us have seen “Upstairs Downstairs,” “Gosford Park” and, more recently, “Downton Abbey,” and do we not ‘wonder’ at how life was back then, in the Edwardian Era. To be a Servant or “In Service” was looked at as a decent job, with a possibility of promotion (after many years), especially if you worked “in the big house.” My own grandmother was a maid in service before getting married, and the photo of her in her maid’ uniform, is quite an heirloom. I remember her trying to teach me ‘Silver Service’ (serving in the dining room) and how ‘strange’ it all seemed to me personally.
  • Pamela Hazelton
    Published 2 months ago
    Most Iconic Duo: And So it was Written

    Most Iconic Duo: And So it was Written

    Behind every story is a writer—someone who painstakingly strings words together. The goal is simple: to trigger an emotional response.
  • Mae McCreery
    Published 3 months ago
    The Lost Generation

    The Lost Generation

    Americans who lived in Paris at this time had many different types of jobs. Although most people fell into a type of artistry or were independently wealthy. Considering an American could live in Paris for about a $1,000 for a whole year, a lot of people came to Paris to party and not work. While Ernest Hemingway lived in a one bedroom apartment with his wife, writing articles about life in Paris to the Toronto Star, Cole Porter had moved to Paris solely with his grandfather’s fortune. Although he did make a name for himself as a songwriter, but he made little money from it.
  • Andrew Dixon
    Published 5 months ago
    Sweatshops

    Sweatshops

    Every day first world citizens benefit from the labor of those in other countries. Most of the labor is performed in poorly run facilities that have a tendency to take advantage of the employees. Sweatshops have been an industrial stronghold since America took the world of business by surprise in the eighteen-hundreds. The use of sweatshops is not hidden but widely ignored by the masses. I wanted to research this topic to better understand sweatshops and how they function, after seeing a political commentary on it. The purpose of this essay is to delve into how sweatshops affect companies outsourcing labor and the people providing labor. The essay will cover why America outsources labor, the effects of outsourcing labor, and alternatives for employers and employees.
  • Haley Bice
    Published 6 months ago
    The house and life of Jacques Coeur

    The house and life of Jacques Coeur

    There are many intrigues surrounding the house of Jacques Coeur, just as interesting, in fact, is the life of the man who owned the house. From a successful businessperson to a man framed for crimes against the king, he and his home have seen it all. Jacques Coeur’s house in Bourges is an important standing reminder of the Middle Ages in France, as well as a moral reminder of the risks of great wealth and debt.
  • Cheryl E Preston
    Published 7 months ago
    Vaseline, Kotex, Kleenex, and Tampax are brand names, not products

    Vaseline, Kotex, Kleenex, and Tampax are brand names, not products

    Most everyone has said themselves or heard someone else say they were going to the store to purchase a box of Kotex, Kleenex, Tampax or a jar of Vasoline. In truth these are name brands of companies that sell sanitary napkins, facial tissues, tampons, and petroleum jelly. Years ago there were not as many companies manufacturing these items as there are today and also most people did not like to use “off brands”. Even when consumers do choose to purchase generic versions of these products, years of habit cause them to still refer to them by the names they have utilized all their lives. Following is a breakdown of each of these products.
  • Anna Nguyễn
    Published 7 months ago
    Globalization's impacts on life

    Globalization's impacts on life

    Today, we are going to find out globalization's importance and effects.
  • John Welford
    Published 7 months ago
    The Tay Bridge Rail Disaster, 1879

    The Tay Bridge Rail Disaster, 1879

    This is the story of the Tay Bridge disaster in December 1879 when a combination of factors, including extreme weather, caused part of the bridge to collapse just as a train was passing across it. There were no survivors.