blingo

Blingo is Business Lingo; an informative series about the lingo and lexicon of all career related fields. Equipping you with necessary vocabulary in an approachable manner.

  • Journal Staff
    Published 3 years ago
    Origin of ‘Always Be Closing’

    Origin of ‘Always Be Closing’

    Children and successful business men have more in common than you may think. One of the first few things they learn in their formative years of life as a child or a businessman are their ABCs. "A-B-C. A-Always, B-Be, C-Closing. Always be closing, always be closing." These words, spoken by the character played by Alec Baldwin in the 1992 film Glengarry Glen Ross, based off of the play of the same name written by David Mamet, was hardly a new idea when it was quoted in the movie. Always Be Closing is a mantra that is commonly used to teach those who are new to sales. But the repetition of this ideal doesn't stop at the learning process. Always Be Closing is a business rule that is used over and over for the duration of a salesman's career. The phrase has been used for decades when instructing salespeople to build careers and maintaining a goal when in a business setting and is one of many terms in the business lingo.
  • Rachel A. David
    Published 3 years ago

    What is a Bear-Hug and a Godfather Offer?

    If you hear talks about a godfather offer or a bear-hug, you might assume you are being invited over for a movie marathon, or that someone wants to give you a warm embrace. While that may be the case, in business lingo these terms often indicate that a lot–a lot–of money is at stake.
  • Zach Foster
    Published 3 years ago
    What Is A "Dead Cat Bounce"? 

    What Is A "Dead Cat Bounce"? 

    A "dead cat bounce" is what happens when a stock value that has been plunging downward suddenly recovers slightly, only to begin falling again. Investor and author Thomas Bulkowski classifies the brief recovery as a dead cat bounce if the stock declined at least 15 percent in one day. People rarely think of dead cats when they think of the Dow Jones or the NASDAQ, but it’s a figure of speech that even a dead cat will bounce if it falls fast enough, hard enough, and long enough.
  • Natasha Sydor
    Published 3 years ago

    Defining ‘The Big Short’

    There are two sides an investor can take in a trade: a long position or a short position. For the average investor investing in their retirement accounts, a long position is all they need to worry about.
  • Zach Foster
    Published 3 years ago

    What Is the Puke Point? 

    If you know much about trading and investing market and stock shares, then you’ll know the “puke point” is the dark, bleak horror land that no investor ever wants to reach... but likely will eventually. At the very best, hitting the puke point means a really crappy day in the market. At worst, the puke point spells out financial ruin for traders or investors who put too many eggs in one shaky basket.