immediate family

Blood makes you related, loyalty makes you family.

  • Maia Moo
    Published 2 days ago
    Silenced interior leiomyomas.

    Silenced interior leiomyomas.

    The uterus; mother of all. A revitalising, prenatal oeuvre and chamber of nurture. Many would consider processes associated with the uterus as "girl problems." Within me, endometrial lining conquers the outside of my womb. Concealment under covers and suppression through pills are the only things that encourage comfort. As a woman with a "wandering womb" which flourishes outside of itself, I find it bothersome that our issues are natural but yet, so misconstrued and shaped into impersonal subjects.
  • Teresa Hedley
    Published 3 days ago
       What's Not Allowed?    What Living in a Pandemic Has Taught Me About Autism

    What's Not Allowed? What Living in a Pandemic Has Taught Me About Autism

    They say that in order to understand something, try it on. Step into its shoes. Wear it for a while; walk a mile in those shoes, and then you will know, really know what it is to be something else, someone else.
  • Phoenixx Fyre Dean
    Published 3 days ago
    The Value Of A Memory

    The Value Of A Memory

    My family had some odd habits when I was growing up. One of the more particularly odd habits of my father was that electricity wasn't permitted in my home on Sundays. No television. No telephone. No stereos. We would gather in the living room or at the dining room table after church and we would play games, tell stories or record cassette tapes to send to the family members that were scattered across the United States. I was a child and thought my father's idea was absolutely stupid. Why in the world couldn't we just be like any other normal family and gather around the television every evening? That we didn't own a television, an action that was taken by my father as a means of discipline, during that period of time further fueled my desire to not be a part of the family gathering. Just as I look back and remember that feeling of "my family is sooooo weird", I can't help but smile at the warm memory of my family gathered around a bulky cassette recorder, before time and circumstances separated we five. It was fun in its purest form. I'm sure the cassette tapes have long been discarded, but the memory will play in my mind forever.
  • Felicia Lee
    Published 9 days ago
    Break Free

    Break Free

    I write about what I know, what I have seen and become engulfed in for over 15 years. Growing up there were no norms for women’s empowerment. I grew up in the era like many women with the cattiness, the girl cliques and the in’s and out crowd. However coming from a woman dominated family. I have literally seen it all. I was exposed to every kind of woman from young. I knew what I aspired to be from the women I was exposed to.
  • Tiffany Linton
    Published 10 days ago
    Divine Women Who've Taught Me The Way

    Divine Women Who've Taught Me The Way

    As one woman, I am more than adamant to share with the world the impact that a number of other women have left me with. When they say "it takes a village to raise a child," I think it goes far beyond just teaching them right from wrong. Being raised in a family in which women out number men played a large role in the way I was brought up. My grandmothers, aunts and cousins have embodied wisdom, grace, strength, and optimism. Even watching how they would handle situations and grow from them was a blueprint in itself for me to follow when the time came. Although they are all so different, they are the backbones of my family. Plus, they are a rainbow in which they blend together so beautifully (even on the rainy days). Seeing women in my family who were nothing but nurses, teachers, and lawyers around me was only confirmation that everything I do must be done to perfection, because I watched them do their jobs every day. My mom would often tell me that as one of seven children, my grandmother and grandfather made the decision to create their own shop and opening that business is what led them to push my aunts and uncles through school. Sacrifice is a constant theme in this family of mine. Just the thought of my mom and her siblings coming from the sweet, small island of Jamaica and creating a beautiful life for my two older brothers and I spoke volumes. I'm grateful for my dad as well, but hey. This one is for the women! Allow me to proceed. This very same family taught me how to love and how to dream without ceasing. When I grew into myself I found my love for the arts. I grew up with a heart for singing, writing, and acting. I had days when I thought they'd feel disappointed because over time I wanted to go through life and sing about it, or perform spoken word pieces about it rather than graduating from Harvard with a BA in Nursing. I felt like there was someone else they'd rather me be, because that's who they were, but I was wrong (for the most part) I still get the, "You don't want to go back and do nursing?" but I know it's all out of love. I'm happy as an English major though. As long as my parents are happy about it as well, then I am too. The same support she showed me along my journey of becoming who I am today is what will inspire me to be the same kind of mother to my future child. The powerful women in my family reminded me that they'll be right behind me as I follow every goal I've set until I reach the pinnacle of my success. They carried traits that reminded me that I am so much more than just a girl and that I am the embodiment of a vital spirit. They still remind me of how I am capable to do anything I want to do in the amount of time that has been granted to me on this earth. My grandmother's prayers have carried over even into today for me to live my life to the fullest even on my not-so-good days. I think the best part of this all is that they've taught me to never prove myself to anybody. I remember every day that I came into this world alone, and that is the same way in which I will be leaving it. I can always depend on them because whenever I am hurting over being mistreated or heartbroken, they remind me that it is okay to feel. It’s not normal to repudiate my emotions and no matter how much the world tries to turn my heart into stone, I carry this with me. They remind me to live my life in harmony with truth and honesty. They emphasize for me to stay focused and to always have a keen eye. Being raised with such care has reminded me of my purpose for walking this Earth. Two forms of the many arts that I adore (music and writing) have presented icons who I look up to, Lauryn Hill and Sista Souljah. I love everything about the spirit of Ms. Hill. She carries herself with so much grace and natural beauty that forces me to just be real with myself and with everyone around me. Her talent is unbelievable and she has a voice that makes me feel like dancing in the middle of a storm. I don't know where the world of music would be without her as one woman. Sista Souljah has taken the boring feel out of reading for me. I loved to write growing up, but I dreaded reading. I became a bookworm after being introduced to The Coldest Winter Ever and A Deeper Love Inside. I think Black urban literature is a significant part of Black culture and those two novels have changed my life, truthfully. They even inspired me to create my own novel which I completed and published earlier this year. I think if the world continues to see through the eyes of the black youth (young black womanhood at that) it would understand us a lot better. She really puts her finest efforts into the pages and I feel every bit of emotion as I read, and re-read, and re-read again. I want to make sure that the young brown girl I bring up is aware of all the things I've learned and experienced from all of these lovely women and then some.
  • Orite Levy
    Published 11 days ago
    The Son of A Father of A Son

    The Son of A Father of A Son

    The son of A father of a son.
  • Emrae
    Published 11 days ago
    Mama
  • Natalie Naidoo
    Published 12 days ago
    To The Baby Who Was

    To The Baby Who Was

    It is the day of the gender reveal and I am so excited to hear the news I've been eagerly anticipating from the moment Your Brother told me you were inside Your Mother's belly.
  • Michelle Schultz
    Published 13 days ago
    Wedding Stress

    Wedding Stress

    I'm getting married! I'm still getting used to saying that. I say it to my fiance about nineteen times a day. It hasn't started driving him nuts... yet. I never really thought I would get married as a kid. I always thought - even growing up, that if I did get married, I would elope in Vegas. So when I realized that I needed to start planning a wedding, I got a little scared. I know there's a lot to it. But I'm a low - stress person. If it causes me stress, I try not to deal with it. Everyone told me, planning my wedding, it was going to be impossible for me to not stress about it. They weren't wrong.
  • M.L.L.
    Published 14 days ago
    A Mother's Hatred

    A Mother's Hatred

    I'm looking back on my life. I'm the little girl. The woman next to me is my mom, and the guy is my brother. This may look like a nice family shot, but there was a lot of fear, hatred, anger and rage hidden behind the fake smiles.
  • Angela Xerakias
    Published 16 days ago
    My Big Fat Greek.....Life

    My Big Fat Greek.....Life

    As many may have figured from my last name starting with an X and sounding like something you’ve never even heard of I am here to tell that even though many may think that my life is certainly compared the movie “My Big Fat Greek Wedding” there are many things that are very different in comparison. For one, my dad doesn’t chase people around the house with windex cleanse and spray us with it if we have an ailment, even though that was pretty funny 🤣and another big thing that many non-Greeks believe after watching this movie is that all Greeks must marry within the Greek community. Well I beg to differ on that one. My godmother actually married an Italian man, hence making my godfather a non-Greek and my two god sisters half Italian and half Greek which in my book is a pretty cool mix. My back story starts like this; my dad first came to the US in the late 1970’s when he was only about 18 years old. He lived in Jersey City, New Jersey and took the ferry into Manhattan and worked as a dishwasher just trying to make ends meet. A few years go by, circa 1983 he goes back to the motherland to become a godfather himself, to who else, my older cousin George. Mind you my aunt set this up completely because she wanted him to meet my mother. And so the story goes that my dad met my mom at my cousins baptism and year later they were married. Eventually they moved back to Jersey and three years later they had my sister, Maria. When she was three they moved to Long Island, NY and two years after that they decided to have me 😳🙂🤣. At the time my dad and uncle Mike had opened up their little version of a coffee shop in Forest Hills, Queens, (which is still there folks go check it out it’s the bomb diggity!). It’s still there to this day even though with this whole corona virus going on we are still doing deliveries and take outs so please go check us out! We need all the help we can get!! But anyway, growing up with 2 immigrant parents from Greece has been totally normal besides the fact that I had to go to Greek school and Greek dance and Sunday school on sundays I still did the normal everyday kid things. I played clarinet in the elementary school band and I was even a Girl Scout. But let me not bore you any further, yes my family is huge and loud and I love them all to death. Hope you like my story 🙂🧐
  • Spencer J. Vigil
    Published 18 days ago
    Heart of the House