Science + Tech

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  • Hyapatia Lee
    Published 3 years ago
    The Crystal Skulls

    The Crystal Skulls

    There are many legends regarding crystal skulls which were associated with the Mayan and other South American tribes and numerous crystal skulls have appeared over the last fifty years claiming to be one of these ancient skulls. A crystal skull was reportedly unearthed on a dig and kept secret by the daughter of the top archaeologists for some reason. Years later, she decided to reveal it. It has been tested and found to have been produced with modern machinery. Of course, Star People could still have manufactured it centuries ago.
  • Paul Levinson
    Published 3 years ago
    Review of Sense8 2.9-11

    Review of Sense8 2.9-11

    Sense8 season 2 came to a cliff-hanging, mid-scene conclusion, with a smart turning-of-the-tables on the sense8 strategy in their battles against sapiens and sense8s.
  • Jack Elliot Marley
    Published 3 years ago
    Six Degrees at Ten

    Six Degrees at Ten

    When Six Degrees was published, climate refugees in America were languishing far from their homes on the Katrina-ravaged Gulf Coast. In the Arctic sea ice had shrunk to its lowest ebb in recorded history. The year was 2007 and climate change seemed fated to loom over the lives of all in the new century. The book, written by environmental campaigner Mark Lynas, collected the best guesses of scientists to project a degree-by-degree vision of our warming world, detailing the consequences for humans and nature as the mercury climbed. In 2007 the carbon in our atmosphere hovered around 385 parts per million, but today it is well over 400. Since then global temperatures have also crossed the fateful threshold of 1 degrees Celsius outlined in the book. Each chapter deals with a degree Celsius increment, climaxing as the title would suggest with a climate six degrees warmer than that which has prevailed for most of human existence. So, how closely does our world today follow the trajectory plotted a decade earlier? Reading the first chapter now, and counting the things which have since become ordinary, is startling.
  • daniel morris
    Published 3 years ago
    Symbiote Chapter 3

    Symbiote Chapter 3

    The office of the Minister of War was spartan and utilitarian, as was befitting a high level Bruish bureaucrat. Though they felt no need for any kind of decoration, visiting dignitaries of other species were more comfortable when there was at least a wall pick. Since they could care less either way, there were some picks. All the wall displays were neutral nature scenes from their home world: a jungle moon orbiting a gas supergiant in a binary star system, with one spectral “M” red giant and one “F” type main sequence. Though the scenes were as varied as jungles could be, there were no depictions of animals. The few furnishings in the barren, sad, cold, space, were cold metal and near unbreakable glass.
  • daniel morris
    Published 3 years ago
    A Primer for Dark System

    A Primer for Dark System

    Astronomy tells us that planets orbit stars, stars hang out in clusters and these clusters orbit the supermassive black hole in the center of the galaxy, and the galaxy is zooming away from some center, some big bang. These same astronomers say that, at times, planets are kicked out of their family systems to travel the dark alone. What if some of these outcasts formed their own system? These dark systems would be near impossible to detect with our current tech, but we couldn’t travel there anyway…
  • Brian Switek
    Published 3 years ago
    The Dead Zoo: Dilophosaurus

    The Dead Zoo: Dilophosaurus

    The way some hipsters talk about bands, hardcore paleo fans talk about fossils. “Oh, you only heard of mosasaurs because of Jurassic World? I was into those aquatic lizards back when they were eating sailors in The Land That Time Forgot.” It’s not necessarily charming behavior, but it happens. And I admit that when the cinematic version of Jurassic Park debuted in 1993, I felt a little swell of pride at already being a big fan of the movie's noxious double-crested dinosaur.