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Legalize

Legalize

We're going deep into the weeds of the marijuana legalization conversation.

  • Lindsie Polhemus
    Published 3 years ago
    States that Passed Marijuana Reform in 2016

    States that Passed Marijuana Reform in 2016

    Marijuana legislation was a hot issue in 2016. Ten states passed marijuana reform throughout the year. Those state include Arkansas, California, Florida, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, North Dakota, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. In this article we’re going to discuss what reforms were passed in each state and how it will likely effect the marijuana industry in those states. How will the states that passed marijuana reform in 2016 effect their neighboring states and the future of marijuana reform? But first, let’s look at the states that passed marijuana reform in 2016 and the new changes mean for residents of those states.
  • Ami Roach
    Published 3 years ago
    Most Ridiculous Anti-Drug PSAs

    Most Ridiculous Anti-Drug PSAs

    There are great ways of selling the message "Stay away from drugs, kids!" but anti-drugs public service announcements, or PSAs, really aren’t it. Ridiculous and hysterical, you can only take these seriously if you’re already high. And, if you’ve ever settled down to an evening snickering at Reefer Madness, then you’ll already know just how hysterical a piece of finely crafted drug propaganda can be. Just remember that the makers of these videos hoped, and even expected, that you’d take them all utterly seriously.
  • Stoner Girl Diary
    Published 3 years ago
    Stoner States of America

    Stoner States of America

    2016 is brewing up to be one of the most vital years for marijuana reform to date. While many states avidly tried to collect enough signatures to make it to the November 2016 ballot, the following states are the only ones confirmed to vote on marijuana reform this up-coming election. Whether it be for medicinal or recreational use, these stoner states will do whatever it takes to move forward with marijuana reform and will pave the way for America’s future.
  • Izzy Erlich
    Published 4 years ago
    Is the War on Drugs Racist?

    Is the War on Drugs Racist?

    Legalization of marijuana first found itself as a part of the battle against racism. It should be no surprise that many of America's archaic drug laws have a common root in racism. Today's new generation of drug users are trapped in a sea of drug laws and enforcement bureaucracies which were designed not for medical, religious, or moral reasons, but to harass and persecute America's racial minorities—Asian, Latino and African Americans. Ironically, the oldest of the racist drug practices is tied, not to stopping drug use, but to promoting it.