Journal logo

The 80/20 Rule (Pareto Principle)

by Harendra Verma 8 days ago in advice

Understand the law of the vital few or the principle of factor sparsity.

Desgined With Canva.com

According to the Pareto principle, for so many events, around 80% of the consequences result from 20% of the causes (the "vital few"). This idea is also known as the 80/20 rule, the "law of vital few", or "principle of factor sparsity".

Consultant Joseph M. Juran coined the phrase in the area of quality control and development, calling it after Italian mathematician Vilfredo Pareto, who discovered the 80/20 relationship in 1896 while studying at the University of Lausanne. Pareto demonstrated in his first book, Cours d'économie politique, that around 80% of the land in Italy was held by 20% of the people. The Pareto principle has just a tangential relationship with Pareto efficiency.

For a given set of conditions, the 80/20 rule is generally characterized by a power-law distribution (also known as a Pareto distribution), and many natural events have been proven to have such a distribution. It is a company management cliche that "80 percent of revenues originate from 20 percent of the clientele".

80/20 Rule in Computer Science

https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-80-20-for-computer-science

The Pareto principle can be applied to optimization attempts in computer science. Microsoft, for example, said that by resolving the top 20% of the most-reported defects, 80 percent of the linked errors and crashes in a particular system would be eradicated. Lowell Arthur stated that "Eighty percent of the faults are found in 20% of the code. Find them and repair them!" It was also determined that in general, 80 percent of a piece of software may be created in 20% of the entire time allotted. The toughest 20% of the code, on the other hand, takes 80% of the time. This component is commonly included in COCOMO estimates for software coding.

WordPerfect (Word processing software) and other software engineers discover what consumers want the majority of the time and how they want it done: the 80/20 rule (users utilize 20% of a program's functionality 80% of the time). Software engineers strive to make common functions as easy, automated, and unavoidable as feasible.

Software Testing

https://psycho-tests.com/blog/pareto-law

In the context of software testing, the Pareto principle is often read as "80% of all faults may be located in 20% of program modules." In other words, half of the modules may be completely bug-free. Applying the Pareto Idea to software quality control operations can assist reduce testing time and boost system efficiency, but the principle itself requires high analytical and logical abilities.

Some Important Points

  1. According to the Pareto principle, for many occurrences, around 80% of the outcomes result from 20% of the causes (the "vital few").
  2. This concept is often referred to as the 80/20 rule, the "law of crucial few," or the "principle of factor sparsity."
  3. In the field of quality control and development, consultant Joseph M. Juran invented the phrase, naming it after Italian mathematician Vilfredo Pareto, who established the 80/20 connection in 1896 while studying at the University of Lausanne.
  4. The 80/20 rule is often defined by a power-law distribution (also known as a Pareto distribution) for a particular set of conditions, and many natural occurrences have been demonstrated to have such a distribution.
  5. It is a firm management cliche that "80% of sales come from 20% of the clients."
  6. In computer science, the 80/20 rule applies.
  7. In computer science, the Pareto principle can be applied to optimization attempts.

Summary

The 80/20 Rule is often referred to as the "rule of vital few" or the "principle of factor sparsity." In computer science, the Pareto principle can be applied to optimization attempts. Microsoft, for example, claims that by fixing the top 20% of the most-reported flaws, 80 percent of the associated errors and crashes would be eliminated.

Thank you for reading this post; don't forget to follow me if you want to read more like it. If you think this story will be useful to others, please share it with your friends.

advice

Harendra Verma

Full stack developer and Technical writer

Read next: Planning the Management of VIP Events

Find us on social media

Miscellaneous links

  • Explore
  • Contact
  • Privacy Policy
  • Terms of Use
  • Support

© 2022 Creatd, Inc. All Rights Reserved.